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These plant and soil data were collected by Timothy M. Wertin and Sasha C. Reed in the spring, summer, and fall of 2011 at a climate manipulation experiment site near Moab, UT (38.521411, -109.470567). These data were collected to assess how warming affects leaf photosynthesis, soil CO 2 efflux, and soil chemistry in plots of ambient and warming treatments.
1. Plant carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) inputs to soil interact with microbes and abiotic factors like climate and pH to influence soil fertility and plant productivity. Although root exudates and root litter are important factors affecting the cycling of nutrients critical to plant growth, many studies remain focused on effects of above-ground litter inputs. 2. Using two species that co-dominate alpine moist meadows as a model system (the phenolic-rich forb Geum rossii, and the fast-growing grass Deschampsia caespitosa), we asked whether C from G. rossii fine roots could reduce D. caespitosa growth. We hypothesized that root C would indirectly reduce D. caespitosa growth by stimulating soil microbes, thus restricting...
Effects of the northern pocket gopher (Thomomys talpoides) on surface soilcharacteristics were examined at the alpinesite of Niwot Ridge, CO. We measured erosionof soil from gopher mounds and compared thecharacteristics of gopher mound (disturbed) andundisturbed soils in two major plant communitytypes. Our measurements of erosion indicatelong-term susceptibility of gopher-disturbedsoils to redistribution by water and/or wind inthis ecosystem. Ecosystem heterogeneityintroduced by the gopher is reflected insignificantly lower SOM in gopher mounds thanin surrounding undisturbed soils, acharacteristic which appears to be causallyassociated with other effects of gopherdisturbance including changes in soil textureand...
1. As central place foragers, ants accumulate organic debris near their nests. Consequently, soil nutrient stocks are often enriched near the nest site. We investigated the hypothesis that plant-derived food sources, such as extrafloral nectar (EFN), can encourage soil-dwelling ant colonies to nest near the plant, thereby inadvertently providing the plant with an additional source of mineral nutrients. The study focused on a population of Acacia constricta, a North American shrub bearing EFNs. 2. Several lines of evidence supported the notion that food rewards drew ant nests close to A. constricta plants. Firstly, ant species that visit EFNs nested significantly closer to A. constricta plants than would be expected...
Pinyon and juniper have been expanding into sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) ecosystems since settlement of the Great Basin around 1860. Herbaceous understory vegetation is eliminated as stand densities increase and the potential for catastrophic fires increases. Prescribed fire is increasingly used to remove trees and promote recovery of sagebrush ecosystems. We quantified the effects of prescribed fire, vegetation type, and time following fire on soil KCl extractable nitrogen and NaHCO3 extractable phosphorus in a pinyon?juniper woodland and its associated sagebrush ecosystem immediately before and for 4 years after a spring prescribed burn. Potassium chloride extractable NH4+ and total inorganic-N increased immediately...
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Soil data were collected from catchments of USGS edge-of-field (EOF) monitoring sites in Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) priority watersheds. As part of this release, soil data from 2016 through 2019 are provided from 14 sites spanning 5 Great Lake States (Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and New York). The data collected are from private farms representing a variety of agronomic systems, landscapes settings, soil types, and climate regimes. These data can be used to investigate relationships among microbial properties (e.g. soil microbial biomass, activity, diversity, and enzymes), general soil structure (e.g. bulk density, soil aggregate structure, soil water holding capacity, soil texture, and infiltration...
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Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) is an exotic, invasive shrub of riparian corridors in the western United States that can promote soil salinization via leaf exudates as Tamarix litter accumulates on the soil surface. Tamarix stands occur in association with big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus), and cottonwood (Populus deltoides) in northern Wyoming, depending on topographic position. Revegetation of Tamarix-invaded sites can be limited by altered soil conditions. Tamarix stands in northcentral Wyoming were selected to determine the relationship of Tamarix shrubs and associated vegetation to soil salinity, pH, and nutrients. In general, salinity of surface soils (0?5 cm) was greater...
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In a semi-arid, upland setting on the Colorado Plateau that is underlain by nutrient-poor Paleozoic eolian sandstone, alternating episodes of dune activity and soil formation during the late Pleistocene and Holocene have produced dominantly sandy deposits that support grass and shrub communities. These deposits also contain eolian dust, especially in paleosols. Eolian dust in these deposits is indicated by several mineralogic and chemical disparities with local bedrock, but it is most readily shown by the abundance of titaniferous magnetite in the sandy deposits that is absent in local bedrock. Magnetite and some potential plant nutrients (especially, P, K, Na, Mn, and Zn) covary positively with depth (3?4 m) in...
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Desertification is a global problem, costly to national economies and human societies. Restoration of biological soil crusts (BSCs) may have an important role to play in the reversal of desertification due to their ability to decrease erosion and enhance soil fertility. To determine if there is evidence that lower fertility may hinder BSC recolonization, we investigated the hypothesis that BSC abundance is driven by soil nutrient concentrations. At a regional scale (north and central Colorado Plateau, USA), moss and lichen cover and richness are correlated with a complex water?nutrient availability gradient and have approximately six-fold higher cover and approximately two-fold higher species richness on sandy soils...
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The growth of temperate forests is typically limited by the availability of nitrogen. Elevated concentrations of nitrate in some Catskill Mountain streams, which are tributary to New York City's water-supply reservoirs west of the Hudson River, indicate that the forests of this region are at the early stages of nitrogen saturation. That is, nitrogen is available in excess of the amount utilized by vegetation and soil microorganisms in the forests. Nitrogen saturation is a concern because the mobile nitrate that moves through soil is accompanied by other nutrients such as the base cations calcium and magnesium that are necessary for forest growth but are present in short supply in some Catskill soils. And, nutrient...
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In upland areas of Canyonlands National Park, Utah, thin deposits and paleosols show late Quaternary episodes of eolian sedimentation, pedogenesis, and climate change. Interpretation of the stratigraphy and optically stimulated luminescence ages of eolian and nearby alluvial deposits, their pollen, and intercalated paleosols yields the following history: (1) Eolian deposition at ca. 46 ka, followed by several episodes of alluviation from some time before ca. 40 ka until after 16 ka (calibrated). (2) Eolian deposition from ca. 17 ka to 12 ka, interrupted by periods of pedogenesis, coinciding with late Pleistocene alluviation as local climate became warmer and wetter. (3) A wetter period from 12 to 8.5 ka corresponding...


    map background search result map search result map Soil salinity patterns in Tamarix invasions in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA Late Quaternary eolian dust in surficial deposits of a Colorado Plateau grassland: Controls on distribution and ecologic effects Late Quaternary eolian and alluvial response to paleoclimate, Canyonlands, southeastern Utah Evidence for micronutrient limitation of biological soil crusts- Importance to arid-lands restoration An Assessment of Forest Health and Soil Nutrient Status to Determine the Effects of Logging Practices on Water Quality in New York City's West-of-Hudson Watersheds Experimental Design Plant and Soil Measurement Data for Achnatherum hymenoides from a warming experiment, Colorado Plateau, 2011 - Data Soil physical, chemical, and biological data from edge-of-field agricultural water quality monitoring sites in Great Lakes States Experimental Design Plant and Soil Measurement Data for Achnatherum hymenoides from a warming experiment, Colorado Plateau, 2011 - Data An Assessment of Forest Health and Soil Nutrient Status to Determine the Effects of Logging Practices on Water Quality in New York City's West-of-Hudson Watersheds Late Quaternary eolian dust in surficial deposits of a Colorado Plateau grassland: Controls on distribution and ecologic effects Late Quaternary eolian and alluvial response to paleoclimate, Canyonlands, southeastern Utah Soil salinity patterns in Tamarix invasions in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA Evidence for micronutrient limitation of biological soil crusts- Importance to arid-lands restoration Soil physical, chemical, and biological data from edge-of-field agricultural water quality monitoring sites in Great Lakes States