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The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta of Alaska is a globally important region for numerousavian species including millions of migrating and nesting waterbirds. Climate change effectssuch as sea level rise and increased storm frequency and intensity have the potential to impactwaterbird populations and breeding habitat. In order to determine the potential impacts of theseclimate-mediated changes, we investigated both short-term and long-term impacts of stormsurges to geese and eider species that commonly breed on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Todetermine short-term impacts, we compared nest densities of geese and eiders in relation to themagnitude of storms that occurred in the prior fall from 2000–2013. Additionally, we modeledgeese...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: BIRDS, BIRDS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, DELTAS, All tags...
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This project evaluated the potential impacts of storm surges and relative sea level rise on nesting geese and eider species that commonly breed on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (Y-K Delta). Habitat suitability maps for breeding waterbirds were developed to identify current waterbird breeding habitat and distributions. Short-term climate change impacts were assessed by comparing nest densities in relation to magnitude of storms that occurred in the prior fall from 2000-2013. Additionally, nest densities were modeled using random forests in relation to the time-integrated flood index (e.g., a storm specific measure accounting for both water depth and duration of flooding) for four modeled storms (2005, 2006, 2009, and...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: BIRDS, BIRDS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, DELTAS, All tags...
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The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta of Alaska is a globally important region for numerous avian species including millions of migrating and nesting waterbirds. Climate change effects such as sea level rise and increased storm frequency and intensity have the potential to impact waterbird populations and breeding habitat. In order to determine the potential impacts of these climate-mediated changes, we investigated both short-term and long-term impacts of storm surges to geese and eider species that commonly breed on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.To do this, we used 29 years of ground-based surveys conducted as part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s long-term waterbird monitoring program along with flood indices modeled...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: BIRDS, BIRDS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT MODELS, DELTAS, All tags...
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Understanding the causes of relative sea level rise requires knowledge of changes to both land (uplift and subsidence) and sea level. However, measurements of coastal uplift or subsidence are almost completely lacking in western Alaska. This project provided precise measurements of prioritized benchmarks across the Western Alaska geography, improving the network of published tidal benchmark elevations, allowing for tidal datum conversion in more places, and providing a necessary component for improved inundation studies in coastal communities and low-lying areas. The project’s map of vertical velocities (uplift/subsidence) of western Alaska (see ‘Final Project Report’ & ‘Vertical Velocity Map’, below) will be combined...
Understanding the causes of relative sea level rise requires knowledge of changes to both land (uplift and subsidence) and sea level. However, measurements of coastal uplift or subsidence are almost completely lacking in western Alaska. This project provided precise measurements of prioritized benchmarks across the Western Alaska geography, improving the network of published tidal benchmark elevations, allowing for tidal datum conversion in more places, and providing a necessary component for improved inundation studies in coastal communities and low-lying areas. The project’s map of vertical velocities (uplift/subsidence) of western Alaska (see ‘Final Project Report’ & ‘Vertical Velocity Map’, below) will be combined...
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The goal of this project is to provide a preliminary overview, at a National scale, the relative susceptibility of the Nation's coast to sea- level rise through the use of a coastal vulnerability index (CVI). This initial classification is based upon the variables geomorphology, regional coastal slope, tide range, wave height, relative sea-level rise and shoreline erosion and accretion rates. The combination of these variables and the association of these variables to each other furnish a broad overview of regions where physical changes are likely to occur due to sea-level rise.
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For more information about how these data were developed, please see the final report. Expert opinion was used to define a resistance surface for each of the target animals, with higher resistance representing map units expected to be more difficult and more dangerous for species to move through. A set of nodes for each species, with node points indicating center locations for potential source populations for the species, are also defined. Note actual species population data to define the nodes is not used, as that data was often unavailable, and the focus is on the potential spread of the species across the SALCC region and not limited to models to known populations. Therefore, node locations were determined by...
Some of California’s most cherished coastal wetlands, where endangered birds chatter and green growth thrives, could turn to mudflats by the middle of the century. By the end of the century, they could be gone. New research based on years of observation says rising sea levels might well outpace the ability of coastal wetlands to adapt, inundating them before they have time to colonize higher elevations. Continue Reading >>
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These three PDFs contain qualitative notes taken during focus group-style interviews in 2017 with coastal resource managers Grand Bay, AL; Port Aransas, TX; and Tampa Bay, FL about their data needs related to tidal wetlands and sea level rise and interest in working with USGS researchers to receive that data. The coastal managers were all engaged in conversations with USGS scientists as part of a separate project entitled Landscape conservation design for enhancing the adaptive capacity of coastal wetlands in the face of sea-level rise and coastal development, regarding tidal wetlands in the Gulf Coast region and the ability of investigators leading that project to provide data suitable for use in various resource...
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This data is from a survey of participants in four workshops hosted by USGS researchers in collaboration with The Nature Conservancy (TNC) in communities along the Gulf Coast in 2017. The workshops were part of the Landscape conservation design project, funded separately by the USGS. The current project had no role in identifying or selected coastal managers with whom to speak; that was the responsibility of the Landscape conservation design project and occurred before the involvement of the current project team. These data are particular to the interactions between the Landscape conservation design project team and the particular coastal managers who engaged with their project. The workshops were held in: Milton,...
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Northeast Region Marsh Migration is one of a suite of products from the Nature’s Network project. Based on sea level rise (SLR) analysis by NOAA, this dataset depicts potential marsh migration zones at various sea level rise scenarios from 0-6’. Identification of suitable uplands adjacent to tidal wetlands is based on topography, habitat type, land use, and development, and can be used for facilitating marsh migration through land protection and/or management. The NOAA Coastal Change Analysis Program (CCAP) mapped the initial (current) distribution of potential marshes and and other coastal land cover types. The Detailed Method for Mapping Sea Level Rise Marsh Migration provides the full methodology for the data...
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Palau buildings (from PALARIS) with elevation data (extracted from USGS DEM)
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Understanding how sea-level rise will affect coastal landforms and the species and habitats they support is critical for developing approaches that balance the needs of humans and native species. Given the magnitude of the threat posed by sea-level rise, and the urgency to better understand it, there is an increasing need to forecast sea-level rise effects on barrier islands. To address this problem, scientists in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology program are developing Bayesian networks as a tool to evaluate and to forecast the effects of sea-level rise on shoreline change, barrier island geomorphology, and habitat availability for species such as the piping plover (Charadrius melodus)...
Categories: Data; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Assateague Island, Assateague Island, Assateague Island National Seashore, Assateague Island National Seashore, Atlantic Ocean, All tags...
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Understanding how sea-level rise will affect coastal landforms and the species and habitats they support is critical for crafting approaches that balance the needs of humans and native species. Given this increasing need to forecast sea-level rise effects on barrier islands in the near and long terms, we are developing Bayesian networks to evaluate and to forecast the cascading effects of sea-level rise on shoreline change, barrier island state, and piping plover habitat availability. We use publicly available data products, such as lidar, orthophotography, and geomorphic feature sets derived from those, to extract metrics of barrier island characteristics at consistent sampling distances. The metrics are then incorporated...
Categories: Data; Types: Downloadable, GeoTIFF, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Raster, Shapefile; Tags: Atlantic Ocean, Barrier Island, Bayesian Network, CMHRP, Coastal Erosion, All tags...
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Understanding how sea-level rise will affect coastal landforms and the species and habitats they support is critical for crafting approaches that balance the needs of humans and native species. Given this increasing need to forecast sea-level rise effects on barrier islands in the near and long terms, we are developing Bayesian networks to evaluate and to forecast the cascading effects of sea-level rise on shoreline change, barrier island state, and piping plover habitat availability. We use publicly available data products, such as lidar, orthophotography, and geomorphic feature sets derived from those, to extract metrics of barrier island characteristics at consistent sampling distances. The metrics are then incorporated...
Categories: Data; Types: Downloadable, GeoTIFF, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Raster, Shapefile; Tags: Atlantic Ocean, Barrier Island, Bayesian Network, CMGP, Coastal Erosion, All tags...
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Low-lying island environments, such as the Majuro Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, are particularly vulnerable to inundation (coastal flooding) whether the increased water levels are from episodic events (storm surge, wave run-up, king tides) or from chronic conditions (long term sea-level rise). Land elevation is the primary geophysical variable that determines exposure to inundation in coastal settings. Accordingly, coastal elevation data are a critical input for assessments of inundation exposure and vulnerability. Previous research has demonstrated that the quality of data used for elevation-based assessments must be well understood and applied to properly model potential impacts. The vertical...
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Understanding how sea-level rise will affect coastal landforms and the species and habitats they support is critical for crafting approaches that balance the needs of humans and native species. Given this increasing need to forecast sea-level rise effects on barrier islands in the near and long terms, we are developing Bayesian networks to evaluate and to forecast the cascading effects of sea-level rise on shoreline change, barrier island state, and piping plover habitat availability. We use publicly available data products, such as lidar, orthophotography, and geomorphic feature sets derived from those, to extract metrics of barrier island characteristics at consistent sampling distances. The metrics are then incorporated...
Categories: Data; Types: Downloadable, GeoTIFF, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Raster, Shapefile; Tags: Atlantic Ocean, Barrier Island, Bayesian Network, CMHRP, Cape Cod, All tags...
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Information about these images can be found in the Final Report for Sea-level Rise Response Modeling for San Francisco Bay Estuary Tidal Marshes. Site-specific data are available by request. Contact: Dr. John Y. Takekawa, USGS Western Ecological Research Center, San Francisco Bay Estuary Field Station, 505 Azuar Dr. Vallejo, Calif. 94592, 707-562-2000
[Excerpt from Introduction] "The San Francisco Bay Estuary supports a large and diverse bird community. More than 50% of most Pacific flyway diving duck populations are found in the Estuary during the winter months (Trost 2002; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2002). San Francisco Bay has been designated as a site of international importance for shorebirds (Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network), supporting millions of individuals (Morrison et al. 2001; Takekawa et al. 2001; Warnock et al. 2002), including species that use tidal marsh habitats. In total, the Bay’s tidal marshes support at least 113 bird species that represent 31 families (Takekawa et al., in press)..."


map background search result map search result map Black Bear Connectivity Wave Height Data for the Gulf of Mexico Marsh Migration Zones, Northeast U.S. Webinar (2015 Oct 14) Final Report: The Influence of Fall Storms on Nest Densities of Geese and Eiders on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta of Alaska Part I Summary: Predicting waterbird nest distributions Inundation Exposure Assessment for Majuro Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands points, transects, beach width: Barrier island geomorphology and shorebird habitat metrics at 50-m alongshore transects and 5-m cross-shore points: Edwin B. Forsythe NWR, NJ, 2010 points, transects, beach width: Barrier island geomorphology and shorebird habitat metrics at 50-m alongshore transects and 5-m cross-shore points: Monomoy Island, MA, 2013-2014 points, transects, beach width: Barrier island geomorphology and shorebird habitat metrics at 50-m alongshore transects and 5-m cross-shore points: Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuge, RI, 2014 Seabeach Amaranth Presence-Absence Data, Assateague Island National Seashore, 2010 Interview transcripts from meetings with coastal resource managers about data needs related to coastal wetlands and sea level rise Survey of participants in USGS-TNC Gulf Coast wetlands workshops 2017 Buildings with Elevation in Babeldaob, Palau points, transects, beach width: Barrier island geomorphology and shorebird habitat metrics at 50-m alongshore transects and 5-m cross-shore points: Monomoy Island, MA, 2013-2014 Inundation Exposure Assessment for Majuro Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands Buildings with Elevation in Babeldaob, Palau points, transects, beach width: Barrier island geomorphology and shorebird habitat metrics at 50-m alongshore transects and 5-m cross-shore points: Edwin B. Forsythe NWR, NJ, 2010 Seabeach Amaranth Presence-Absence Data, Assateague Island National Seashore, 2010 points, transects, beach width: Barrier island geomorphology and shorebird habitat metrics at 50-m alongshore transects and 5-m cross-shore points: Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuge, RI, 2014 Webinar (2015 Oct 14) Final Report: The Influence of Fall Storms on Nest Densities of Geese and Eiders on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta of Alaska Part I Summary: Predicting waterbird nest distributions Survey of participants in USGS-TNC Gulf Coast wetlands workshops 2017 Wave Height Data for the Gulf of Mexico Interview transcripts from meetings with coastal resource managers about data needs related to coastal wetlands and sea level rise Marsh Migration Zones, Northeast U.S. Black Bear Connectivity