Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: Saltcedar (X)

22 results (64ms)   

View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
Non-native shrub species in the genus Tamarix (saltcedar, tamarisk) have colonized hundreds of thousands of hectares of floodplains, reservoir margins, and other wetlands in western North America. Many resource managers seek to reduce saltcedar abundance and control its spread to increase the flow of water in streams that might otherwise be lost to evapotranspiration, to restore native riparian (streamside) vegetation, and to improve wildlife habitat. However, increased water yield might not always occur and has been substantially lower than expected in water salvage experiments, the potential for successful revegetation is variable, and not all wildlife taxa clearly prefer native plant habitats over saltcedar....
Invasion by Tamarix (L.) can severely alter riparian areas of the western U.S., which are globally rare ecosystems. The upper Verde River, Arizona, is a relatively free-flowing river and has abundant native riparian vegetation. Tamarix is present on the upper Verde but is a minor component of the vegetation (8% of stems). This study sought to determine whether riparian vegetation characteristics differed between sites where Tamarix was present and sites where Tamarix was absent during the invasion of the upper Verde. We hypothesized that herbaceous understory and woody plant communities would differ between Tamarix present and absent sites. Our hypothesis was generally confirmed, the two types of sites were different....
Saltcedars (Tamarix spp., Tamaricaceae) (SC), are exotic, invasive shrubs to medium trees native to the Old World. In riparian ecosystems of the western United States, SC replaces native plant communities, degrades wildlife habitat, reduces biodiversity, alters stream channel morphology, uses large quantities of groundwater, increases wildfire frequency, reduces recreational and agricultural usage, and probably has contributed to the decline of many wildlife and fish species. In recent years, the southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax trailii extimus) (sw WIFL) has begun nesting extensively in SC in some of its major breeding areas in Arizona, but not in other areas, since SC has replaced its native willow nest...
thumbnail
The project and funding will be spread over a 5 year period beginning in 2008. The project will consist of controlling and eradicating Tamarix (Salt Cedar) along Muddy Creek, Blacks Fork River, and their tributaries. The project will be labor intensive. The project will consist of individual spot treatments spraying of the seedling, young and mature salt cedar plants, and cutting (chain saw or other methods of cutting down) the larger mature salt cedar plants and swabbing the stumps with herbicides. Herbicides used need to be on the BLM approved chemical list and label followed for applications. The herbicides are most effective when a colorant is used to mark plants treated and a penetrating oil used with the herbicide....
thumbnail
Current invasion ecology theory predicts that disturbance will stimulate invasion by exotic plant species. Cheatgrass or Downy brome (Bromus tectorum) was surveyed in three sites near Florence, Colorado, U.S.A., immediately following Tamarisk or Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) control and restoration activities that caused disturbance. Despite predictions to the contrary, neither mowing with heavy machinery nor tilling for seedbed preparation stimulated invasion, with a trend for the opposite pattern such that highest percent cover of B. tectorum was observed in the least disturbed transects. Aerial application of imazapyr for Tamarix spp. control caused mortality of nearly all B. tectorum and other understory plant species...
Throughout the world, the condition of many riparian ecosystems has declined due to numerous factors, including encroachment of non-native species. In the western United States, millions of dollars are spent annually to control invasions of Tamarix spp., introduced small trees or shrubs from Eurasia that have colonized bottomland ecosystems along many rivers. Resource managers seek to control Tamarix in attempts to meet various objectives, such as increasing water yield and improving wildlife habitat. Often, riparian restoration is an implicit goal, but there has been little emphasis on a process or principles to effectively plan restoration activities, and many Tamarix removal projects are unsuccessful at restoring...
Biological control of invasive saltcedars (Tamarix spp.) in the western U.S. by exotic tamarisk leaf beetles, Diorhabda spp., first released in 2001 after 15 years of development, has been successful. In Texas, beetles from Crete, Greece were first released in 2004 and are providing control. However, adults alight, feed and oviposit on athel (Tamarix aphylla), an evergreen tree used for shade and as a windbreak in the southwestern U.S. and México, and occasionally feed on native Frankenia spp. plants. The ability of tamarisk beetles to establish on these potential field hosts was investigated in the field. In no-choice tests in bagged branches, beetle species from Crete and Sfax, Tunisia produced 30–45% as many...
thumbnail
High-precision (Real-time kinematic) Global Positioning System (GPS) surveys were conducted along the lower Rio Puerco in April 2002, January 2007, April 2010, and April 2014 to support a long-term study of geomorphic processes and the geomorphic history of the arroyo. The study reach extends from the confluence with the Rio San Jose 67 km downvalley to the old Highway 85 bridge near the USGS streamgage near Bernardo, NM. Individual shapefiles were created for data from each survey. Associated metadata files include the names of surveyors and equipment used. The survey extents varied, but all have overlapping points, including repeat surveys of arroyo cross sections. Results from analyses of these data were published...
River systems around the world are subject to various perturbations, including the colonization and spread of non-native species in riparian zones. Riparian resource managers are commonly engaged in efforts to control problematic non-native species and restore native habitats. In western North America, small Eurasian trees or shrubs in the genus Tamarix occupy hundreds of thousands of hectares of riparian lands, and are the targets of substantial and costly control efforts and associated restoration activities. Still, significant information gaps exist regarding approaches used in control and restoration efforts and their effects on riparian ecosystems. In this special section of papers, eight articles address various...
thumbnail
The data release presents observations of riparian vegetation, topography, and ground cover in two river reaches of the Upper Colorado River within a river segment extending 208 river kilometers (rkm), from near the Colorado/Utah border to the confluence of the Green River. Methods included field observations and analysis of the plant community five times over eight years in the fall of 2010, 2012, 2013, 2015 and 2017, encompassing a second cycle of biocontrol-induced dieback of invasive Tamarix spp. shrubs. The data release includes four .csv files related to field observations: UTM coordinates of field transects; vegetation, topography and ground surface information at the pinpoint level and at the transect level;...
thumbnail
The project and funding will be spread over a 5 year period beginning in 2008. The project will consist of controlling and eradicating Tamarix (Salt Cedar) along Muddy Creek, Blacksfork River, and their tributaries. The project will be labor intensive. The project will consist of individual spot treatments spraying of the seedling, young and mature salt cedar plants, and cutting (chain saw or other methods of cutting down) the larger mature salt cedar plants and swabbing the stumps with herbicides. Herbicides used need to be on the BLM approved chemical list and label followed for applications. The herbicides are most effective when a colorant is used to mark plants treated and a penetrating oil used with the herbicide....
thumbnail
Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) is an exotic, invasive shrub of riparian corridors in the western United States that can promote soil salinization via leaf exudates as Tamarix litter accumulates on the soil surface. Tamarix stands occur in association with big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus), and cottonwood (Populus deltoides) in northern Wyoming, depending on topographic position. Revegetation of Tamarix-invaded sites can be limited by altered soil conditions. Tamarix stands in northcentral Wyoming were selected to determine the relationship of Tamarix shrubs and associated vegetation to soil salinity, pH, and nutrients. In general, salinity of surface soils (0?5 cm) was greater...
Altered hydrology of southwestern United States rivers has led to a decline in native cottonwood (Populus deltoides). Areas historically dominated by cottonwood have been replaced by invasive saltcedar (Tamarix chinensis). Restoration of historic hydrology through periodic flooding of riparian areas has been a means of restoring native species. However, due to similarity in germination requirements of cottonwoods and saltcedars, flooding may create an unwanted increase in the number of saltcedar seedlings. Therefore, we evaluated competitive aspects of these co-occurring species in an extant riparian habitat in the arid southwestern US. We measured effects of competition between cottonwood and saltcedar seedlings...
thumbnail
The Sand Creek Saltcedar control project is designed to treat approximately thirty (30) miles of stream bottom in the Colorado River Watershed for saltcedar invasion. Treatment will consist of aerial and ground application of herbicide to remove saltcedar from the area. This is potentially threatened Western yellow-billed cuckoo habitat which is being severely degraded with invasive saltcedar. It is also home to wild horses, deer, elk, antelope, and many other wildlife species, as well as one of the headwaters of many sensitive fish species downstream. This project will directly reduce water wastage, erosion and sedimentation, and salt loading into the Little Snake River, a tributary to the Colorado River. This...
The Hay Reservoir project entails treating approximately 3000 acres for Russian knapweed and salt cedar invasion. Treatment would consist of the ground application of herbicide to control these noxious weeds in the area. There is also whitetop, Canada thistle, black henbane, halogeton, and Swainson’s pea. This area is important to deer, elk, antelope, and many other wildlife species. This project will directly reduce water wastage, erosion, and sedimentation into Hay Reservoir, located in the Great Divide Basin. It will also benefit Red Creek and Hay Reservoir proper, native vegetation, and the wildlife which use the water in this drainage. This area has also failed Standards for Healthy Rangelands due to the invasive...
Non-native shrub species in the genus Tamarix (saltcedar, tamarisk) have colonized hundreds of thousands of hectares of floodplains, reservoir margins, and other wetlands in western North America. Many resource managers seek to reduce saltcedar abundance and control its spread to increase the flow of water in streams that might otherwise be lost to evapotranspiration, to restore native riparian (streamside) vegetation, and to improve wildlife habitat. However, increased water yield might not always occur and has been substantially lower than expected in water salvage experiments, the potential for successful revegetation is variable, and not all wildlife taxa clearly prefer native plant habitats over saltcedar....
thumbnail
This data set contains vegetation data and shows potential suitable vegetation types for Tamarisk (Saltcedar) in the Northwest Plains Ecoregion. This data set contains GAP level II and level III reclassified landcover types. These data are provided by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) "as is" and may contain errors or omissions. The User assumes the entire risk associated with its use of these data and bears all responsibility in determining whether these data are fit for the User's intended use. The User is encouraged to carefully consider the content of the metadata file associated with these data.
Using a retrospective study of tamarisk removal sites across five states in the southwestern United States, we investigated (1) decreases in tamarisk cover; (2) the effects of tamarisk removal on vegetation; and (3) whether cutting or burning tamarisk has differing effects on plant communities. Our study provides an important first step in recognizing the effects of removing a dominant invasive species on meeting long-term goals of riparian restoration. We found that (1) both cutting and burning reduced mean tamarisk foliar cover by 82?95%, and this reduction was sustained over time. (2) Native foliar cover was 2- to 3-fold higher on tamarisk removal sites, but total foliar cover remained 60?75% lower than on control...
Tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima Ledeb., T. chinensis Lour.), a pernicious invader of riparian areas in the western U.S., is often considered to be allelopathic by virtue of an ability to exude salt from its leaves. However, there is no evidence demonstrating allelopathy or even salinization of soils under tamarisk. We collected soil samples from beneath and just outside of tamarisk canopies at 12 sites along a 110-km reach of Fort Peck Reservoir in northeastern Montana. Samples were analyzed for electrical conductivity (EC), pH and concentration of several nutrients. Plants of western wheatgrass (Agropyron smithii Rydb.), the dominant herbaceous native plant in habitats invaded by tamarisk, were grown in the soil...


map background search result map search result map Soil salinity patterns in Tamarix invasions in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA Muddy Creek Tamarix Removal First-Year Responses of Cheatgrass Following Tamarix spp. Control and Restoration-Related Disturbances Blacks Fork River Tamarix Removal Hay Reservoir Weed Treatment Sand Creek Saltcedar Control Lower Rio Puerco GPS survey data collected in 2002, 2007, 2010, and 2014 BLM REA NWP 2011 Tamarisk (Saltcedar) REGAP Level 2/Level 3 Classifications Riparian vegetation, topography, and ground cover constituents along the Upper Colorado River near Moab, UT (2010-2017) Muddy Creek Tamarix Removal Sand Creek Saltcedar Control Lower Rio Puerco GPS survey data collected in 2002, 2007, 2010, and 2014 Blacks Fork River Tamarix Removal Riparian vegetation, topography, and ground cover constituents along the Upper Colorado River near Moab, UT (2010-2017) Soil salinity patterns in Tamarix invasions in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA First-Year Responses of Cheatgrass Following Tamarix spp. Control and Restoration-Related Disturbances BLM REA NWP 2011 Tamarisk (Saltcedar) REGAP Level 2/Level 3 Classifications