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Anthropogenic climate change is expected to dramatically affect boreal forests, not only through warming effects, but through changes in seasonal and diurnal temperature patterns, precipitation, cloud-cover, and direct effects of rising CO2 . My doctoral research examines the impact of these changes on dominant boreal forest conifer species, using dendrochronological methods. Through my analysis of white spruce ( Picea glauca ) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta ) tree rings across five Yukon Territory sites, I found that white spruce growth is showing growth declines in response to all three measured climate changes, with negative correlations between tree ring increment and spring and summer temperature, spring...
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Subsistence fishing and hunting are important for the economies and cultures of many families and communities in Alaska. Subsistence exists alongside other important uses of fish and game in Alaska, including commercial fishing, sport fishing, personal use fishing, and general hunting. This report provides an update on subsistence in Alaska, including the dual state-federal management system.
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The Gwich'in consume traditional country foods as a main staple of their diet. Due to concerns from the Gwich'in with] regards to contaminants in the food chain, the Gwich'in Community Liaison (GCL) position was established. This position enabled the Gwich'in to be a member of and participate in research programs established by the Northern Contaminants Program (NCP). The Gwich'in Community Liaison will continue to promote dialogue and information between the Gwich'in communities, Gwich'in Organizations, NCP representatives, and NCP scientists. Gwich'in Tribal Council (GTC) GCL has participated in monthly Northwest Territories Environmental Contaminants Committee (NWTECC) meetings, liaison of relevant contaminant...
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Abstract The Yukon River Drainage Fisheries Association (YRDFA) conducted a study to collect and utilize traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) held by people living in the villages along the Yukon River as an attempt to better understand changing salmon runs. The study took place during the summers of 2001 and 2002. Twenty-nine participants were interviewed in the four Yukon River villages of Alakanuk, Saint Mary’s, Holy Cross and Nulato. We collected information on local observations of salmon lifecycles, abundance, environmental change and habitat. Through this study we learned that participants are highly affected by the newly regulated subsistence schedule and that their detailed knowledge of their environment,...
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In January 2003, the Federal Subsistence Board adopted new regulations clarifying statewide customary trade practices of subsistence-caught fish and identified the need for additional information, to enable it to further refine regulations. This project addresses that need by documenting customary trade practices of salmon in three villages on the Yukon River. Interviews were conducted with 28 key informants, and included both interviews with individuals and groups. Results from the study indicate that customary trade supports subsistence economies by providing much-needed cash. Customary trade of salmon is part of a social system that distributes resources over time and space. In Alakanuk customary trade was described...
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Subsistence hunting and fishing in Alaska is a political, social, and cultural issue. Since statehood in 1959 the state of Alaska has managed fish and wildlife resources on all its lands. But because the state has been unable to come into compliance with federal regulations mandating a subsistence rural priority, the federal government (which owns about 60% of all Alaskan land) has taken over the management of subsistence on those lands: hunting and fishing management in 1991, and fishery management on many of the state's navigable waterways in 1999. This rural priority was written into a congressional act, the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) in 1980. However the Alaska Constitution states...
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This report presents the results of a harvest survey and ethnographic research project that investigated the subsistence uses of large land mammals and furbearers in Game Management Unit 25 in the Yukon Flats region of Interior Alaska. Large land mammal species harvested and used by Yukon Flats residents include moose Alces alces, caribou Rangifer tarandus, black bear Ursus americanus, and brown bear Ursus arctos. Furbearing species included in this study are marten Martes americana, lynx Lynx canadensis, and wolf Canis lupus. For the 2008–2009 study year a total of 284 of 467 households (approximately 61%) were surveyed in the 7 Yukon Flats communities of Beaver, Birch Creek, Chalkyitsik, Circle, Fort Yukon, Stevens...


map background search result map search result map Yukon River Unified Watershed Assessment Subsistence in Alaska: with an in-depth look at the Upper Copper River Fishery Traditional Ecological Knowledge of Salmon Along the Yukon RIver Traditional Ecological Knowledge of Customary Trade of Subsistence Harvested Salmon on the Yukon River Food customs of rural and urban Inupiaq elders and their relationships to select nutrition parameters, food insecurity, health, and physical and mental functioning Subsistence Land Mammal Harvests and Uses, Yukon Flats, Alaska: 2008-2010 Harvest Report and Ethnographic Update Climate Change in the Canadian Boreal Forest: The Effect of Warming, Frost Events, Cloud Cover and Carbon Dioxide Fertilization on Conifer Tree Rings Offset of the potential carbon sink from boreal forestation by decreases in surface albedo Plant toxins and trophic cascades alter fire regime and succession on a boreal forest landscape Interactive controls of herbivory and fluvial dynamics on landscape vegetation patterns on the Tanana River floodplain, interior Alaska Resilience and Vulnerability of Northern Regions to Social and Environmental Change Well-being and environmental change in the arctic: a synthesis of selected research from Canada’s International Polar Year program Importance of traditional foods for the food security of two First Nations communities in the Yukon, Canada Subsistence use of birds in the northwest Arctic region, Alaska Wild resource harvests and uses by residents of selected communities of the Kenai Peninsula Borough Gwich'in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement: web page Gwich'in Tribal Council communication & education of the NCP-CACAR II Subsistence in Alaska: with an in-depth look at the Upper Copper River Fishery Food customs of rural and urban Inupiaq elders and their relationships to select nutrition parameters, food insecurity, health, and physical and mental functioning Subsistence Land Mammal Harvests and Uses, Yukon Flats, Alaska: 2008-2010 Harvest Report and Ethnographic Update Wild resource harvests and uses by residents of selected communities of the Kenai Peninsula Borough Plant toxins and trophic cascades alter fire regime and succession on a boreal forest landscape Interactive controls of herbivory and fluvial dynamics on landscape vegetation patterns on the Tanana River floodplain, interior Alaska Subsistence use of birds in the northwest Arctic region, Alaska Climate Change in the Canadian Boreal Forest: The Effect of Warming, Frost Events, Cloud Cover and Carbon Dioxide Fertilization on Conifer Tree Rings Gwich'in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement: web page Traditional Ecological Knowledge of Customary Trade of Subsistence Harvested Salmon on the Yukon River Importance of traditional foods for the food security of two First Nations communities in the Yukon, Canada Gwich'in Tribal Council communication & education of the NCP-CACAR II Traditional Ecological Knowledge of Salmon Along the Yukon RIver Offset of the potential carbon sink from boreal forestation by decreases in surface albedo Yukon River Unified Watershed Assessment Well-being and environmental change in the arctic: a synthesis of selected research from Canada’s International Polar Year program Resilience and Vulnerability of Northern Regions to Social and Environmental Change