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Filters: Tags: R2a-Impact Climate Change Vegatation and Subsistence (X) > partyWithName: Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, Division of Subsistence (X)

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TThis report summarizes the results of research conducted in 2011 on the subsistence harvest and uses of wild foods in 6 Kuskokwim River communities: Akiak, Kwethluk, Oscarville, and Tuluksak of the lower river communities; and Georgetown and Napaimute of the central river communities. The principal questions addressed by the Donlin Creek Subsistence Research Program were how many wild foods were harvested for subsistence, the harvest amounts, and how these foods were distributed within and between communities. Related questions addressed the role of wild foods in Alaska’s economy, the role of cash in subsistence economies, the lands and waters used for subsistence practices in the central Kuskokwim area, and the...
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This report summarizes the results of research conducted in 2012 on the subsistence harvest and uses of wild foods for the study year of 2011 in 8 Kuskokwim and Yukon River communities: Napakiak and Napaskiak in the Lower Kuskokwim; McGrath, Takotna, and Nikolai in the Upper Kuskokwim; and Russian Mission, Anvik, and Grayling in the lower-middle Yukon River. The total estimated population of all study communities was 2,023. The principal questions addressed by the Donlin Gold Subsistence Research Program were how many wild foods were harvested for subsistence, the harvest amounts, and how these foods were distributed within and between communities. Related questions addressed the role of wild foods in Alaska’s economy,...
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This report summarizes the results of research conducted in 2010 on the subsistence harvest and uses of wild foods in 8 Kuskokwim River communities: Aniak, Chuathbaluk, Crooked Creek, Lower Kalskag, Red Devil, Sleetmute, Stony River, and Upper Kalskag (estimated total population 1,450). The principal questions addressed by the Donlin Creek Subsistence Research Program were how many wild foods were harvested for subsistence, the harvest amounts, and how these foods were distributed within and between communities. Related questions addressed the role of wild foods in Alaska’s economy, the role of cash in subsistence economies, the lands and waters used for subsistence practices in the central Kuskokwim area, and...


    map background search result map search result map The 1998-99 harvest of moose, caribou, and bear in ten middle Yukon and Koyukuk River communities The 1999-2000 harvest of moose, caribou, and bear in ten middle Yukon and Koyukuk River communities The subsistence harvest  in 8 communities in the Kuskokwim River drainage and lower Yukon River, 2011 The subsistence harvest  in 6 communities in the  Lower and Central Kuskokwim River drainage, 2010 The subsistence harvest  in 8 communities in the central Kuskokwim River drainage, 2009 The subsistence harvest  in 6 communities in the  Lower and Central Kuskokwim River drainage, 2010 The subsistence harvest  in 8 communities in the central Kuskokwim River drainage, 2009 The subsistence harvest  in 8 communities in the Kuskokwim River drainage and lower Yukon River, 2011 The 1998-99 harvest of moose, caribou, and bear in ten middle Yukon and Koyukuk River communities The 1999-2000 harvest of moose, caribou, and bear in ten middle Yukon and Koyukuk River communities