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In the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) wetland plant, invertebrate, and waterbird productivity are primarily driven by water-level dynamics in response to climate cycles. Large proportions of wetlands in the PPR have been drained, often consolidating water from smaller to larger-interconnected wetlands. This project will examine whether large basins that receive inflow from consolidation drainage have reduced water-level dynamics in response to climate cycles than those in undrained landscapes, resulting in relatively stable wetlands that have lower densities of invertebrate forage for ducks and shorebirds. We will also include a sample of wetland historically used by piping plovers to assess the threat of consolidation...
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Many waterbird species utilize a diversity of aquatic habitats; however, with increasing anthropogenic needs tomanage water regimes there is global concern over impacts to waterbird populations. The federally threatened pipingplover (Charadrius melodus; hereafter plovers) is a shorebird that breeds in three habitat types in the Prairie PotholeRegion of North Dakota, South Dakota, and Canada: riverine sandbars; reservoir shorelines; and prairie wetlands. Watersurface areas of these habitats fluctuate in response to wet–dry periods; decreasing water surface areas exposeshorelines that plovers utilize for nesting. Climate varies across the region so when other habitats are unavailable forplover nesting because of flooding,...
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Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) are public-private partnerships composed of states, tribes, federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, universities, international jurisdictions, and others working together to address landscape and seascape scale conservation issues. LCCs inform resource management decisions to address broad-scale stressors-including habitat fragmentation, genetic isolation, spread of invasive species, and water scarcity-all of which are magnified by a rapidly changing climate. For further information go to http://lccnetwork.org. The previous 2011 LCC Network Areas data is available at https://www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/item/52f2735ee4b0a6f0bd498c2f
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Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) are public-private partnerships composed of states, tribes, federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, universities, international jurisdictions, and others working together to address landscape and seascape scale conservation issues. LCCs inform resource management decisions to address broad-scale stressors-including habitat fragmentation, genetic isolation, spread of invasive species, and water scarcity-all of which are magnified by a rapidly changing climate. For further information go to http://lccnetwork.org. The previous 2011 LCC Network Areas data is available at https://www.sciencebase.gov/catalog/item/52f2735ee4b0a6f0bd498c2f
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The goal of this project was to develop a landscape dynamics model to project future trends in forest area, age class distribution, and forest type (cottonwood vs. non-cottonwood) for four remnant floodplain segments on the Missouri River and, for two river segments, project effects of forest changes on abundances of forest bird species. These four river segments have not been channelized or inundated by reservoirs and thus still retain some of the natural abiotic and biotic processes of the Missouri River as it existed before human alteration. Fluvial geomorphic processes on all four, however, were significantly altered by the construction of six dams on the main stem of the river in the mid twentieth century....
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Many waterbird species utilize a diversity of aquatic habitats; however, with increasing anthropogenic needs tomanage water regimes there is global concern over impacts to waterbird populations. The federally threatened pipingplover (Charadrius melodus; hereafter plovers) is a shorebird that breeds in three habitat types in the Prairie PotholeRegion of North Dakota, South Dakota, and Canada: riverine sandbars; reservoir shorelines; and prairie wetlands. Watersurface areas of these habitats fluctuate in response to wet–dry periods; decreasing water surface areas exposeshorelines that plovers utilize for nesting. Climate varies across the region so when other habitats are unavailable forplover nesting because of flooding,...
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Wind power is a promising clean energy technology that has grown rapidly in recent years (EIA 2013). In spite of its environmentally friendly reputation, industrial wind energy generation can have serious impacts on wildlife. Bat and bird collision fatality rates have been alarmingly high at some wind farms. Proper siting of wind facilities may help minimize collision impacts as the wind energy industry continues to grow. Bat and bird fatality rates vary greatly among sites; however, there is no reliable method for assessing collision risk prior to development. My goal was to develop a method for predicting fatality rates based on nocturnal activity patterns measured by ground-level recording of bat and bird calls....
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Wetland hydroperiod, the length of time water is available in wetlands, is sensitive to changes in precipitation, temperature and timing due to climate variation. Truncated hydroperiod has major implications for wetland-dependent species (e.g., waterfowl, amphibians) and human water allocation (PPP LCC Need 1). To characterize wetland hydroperiod in the Plains and Prairie Pothole Region, we first identify location and hydroperiod of wetlands using field-based and remotely sensed training data (RapidEye, Landsat). We define hydroperiod as wetland ephemerality, where ephemerality represents the persistence of a wetland across the growing season. We then link hydroperiod to climatic variation by relating climate time-series...
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Unconventional oil development in the Bakken shale region has increased rapidly as a result of new technologies. This region also supports a particularly high density and diversity of grassland bird species, which are declining across North America. We examined grassland bird response to unconventional oil extraction sites (i.e. developed with hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling) and associated roads in North Dakota. Our goal was to quantify the amount of habitat that was indirectly degraded by oil development, as evidenced by patterns of avoidance by birds. Grassland birds avoided areas within 149 m of roads (95% CI: 4 – 294 m), 267 m of single-bore well pads (95% CI: 157 – 377 m), and 150 m of multi-bore...
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This data is for planning purposes only. LCCs are applied conservation science partnerships with two main functions. The first is to promote collaboration among their members in defining shared conservation goals. With these goals in mind, partners can identify where and how they will take action, within their own authorities and organizational priorities, to best contribute to the larger conservation effort. The second function of LCCs is to provide the science and technical expertise needed to address the shared priorities and support conservation planning at landscape scales – beyond the scope and authority of any one organization. The organizational model of the LCC Network was intentionally structured to operate...


    map background search result map search result map Interactions of Consolidation Drainage and Climate on Water-Level Dynamics, Wetland Productivity, and Waterbirds Consolidation Drainage and Climate Change May Reduce Piping Plover Habitat in the Great Plains Land use and wetland drainage affect water levels and dynamics of remaining wetlands Grassland Birds and Unconventional Oil Development in Western North Dakota Assessing Bat and Bird Fatality Risk at Wind Farm Sites using Acoustic Detectors Projecting Long-term Landscape Change along the Missouri River: Implications for Cottonwood Forests and Songbird Populations Report Wetland hydroperiod and climate change: Completion Report – Phase I Interactions of Consolidation Drainage and Climate on Water-Level Dynamics, Wetland Productivity, and Waterbirds Consolidation Drainage and Climate Change May Reduce Piping Plover Habitat in the Great Plains Land use and wetland drainage affect water levels and dynamics of remaining wetlands Grassland Birds and Unconventional Oil Development in Western North Dakota Assessing Bat and Bird Fatality Risk at Wind Farm Sites using Acoustic Detectors Projecting Long-term Landscape Change along the Missouri River: Implications for Cottonwood Forests and Songbird Populations Report Wetland hydroperiod and climate change: Completion Report – Phase I