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Mountain ecosystems within our national parks and other protected areas provide valuable goods and services such as clean water, biodiversity conservation, and recreational opportunities, but their potential responses to expected climatic changes are inadequately understood. The Western Mountain Initiative (WMI) is a collaboration of scientists whose research focuses on understanding and predicting responses of western mountain ecosystems to climatic variability and change. It is a legacy of the Global Change Research Program initiated by the National Park Service (NPS) in 1991 and continued by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to this day as part of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (http://www.climatescience.gov/)....
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Park Science
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The GRBA draft General Management Plan proposes development in several locations in Kious Spring and Lehman Caves 1:24,000 topographic quadrangles, and these proposed developments need geologic evaluation before construction. Brown will act as project manager to coordinate the IA with time frames, budget constraints, and the timely preparation of required maps, reports, and GIS data sets. In addition to having been an interpretive Ranger-Naturalist in two National Parks, Brown has published USGS interpretive geologic maps and USGS bulletins. Her research includes sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and structural analyses of Laramide intermontane basins in the Westem Interior.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Park Science
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White-nose syndrome emerged as a devastating new disease of North American hibernating bats over the past four winters. The disease has spread more than 1,600 kilometers (1,000 mi) since it was first observed in a small area of upstate New York, and has affected six species of bats in the caves and mines they rely on for winter survival. A newly discovered, cold-loving fungus (Geomyces destructans) causes the characteristic skin infection of white-nose syndrome and can infect presumably healthy bats when they hibernate. Although clear links between skin infection by G. destructans and death have not yet been established, the fungus is the most plausible cause of the disease. Thousands of caves and mines are administered...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Park Science
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For the past several years NPS planners at the Denver Service Center and consultants at University of Minnesota and the University of Vermont CPSUs have been developing a process intended to help park planners and managers address visitor carrying capactiy. The rest of this article summarizes this process, called the Visitor Experience and Resource Protection (VERP) process as well as discusses a pilot project at Arches NP. Published in Park Science, volume 4, issue 1, on pages 11 - 13, in 1994.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation, Journal Citation; Tags: Park Science
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Didymosphenia geminata (didymo) is a freshwater alga native to North America, including Glacier National Park, Montana. It has long been considered a cold-water species, but has recently spread to lower latitudes and warmer waters, and increasingly forms large blooms that cover streambeds. We used a comprehensive monitoring data set from the National Park Service (NPS) and USGS models of stream temperatures to explore the drivers of didymo abundance in Glacier National Park. We estimate that approximately 64% of the stream length in the park contains didymo, with around 5% in a bloom state. Results suggest that didymo abundance likely increased over the study period (2007–2009), with blooms becoming more common....
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Park Science
Microbiotic crusts are found throughout the world, from the hottest deserts to polar regions. Most of these crusts are dominated by cyanobacteria, and also include lichens, mosses, green algae, microfungi, and bacteria. The crusts are critical components of these ecosystems, significantly modifying the surfaces on which they occur. In the cold deserts of the Colorado Plateau region (parts of Utah, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico), these crusts are extraordinarily well-developed, and may represent 70-80 percent of the living ground cover. Cyanobacteria, previously called blue-green algae, are the oldest form of life known. The earliest fossils found, called stromatolites and dating back more than 3.5 billion years,...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation, Journal Citation; Tags: Park Science
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Abstract not supplied at this time
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Park Science
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Accounting for ecosystem carbon is increasingly important for park managers. In this case study we present our efforts to estimate carbon stocks and the effects of management on carbon stocks for Redwood National and State Parks in northern California. Using currently available information, we estimate that on average these parks’ soils contain approximately 89 tons of carbon per acre (200 Mg C per ha), while vegetation contains about 130 tons C per acre (300 Mg C per ha). estoration activities at the parks (logging-road removal, second-growth forest management) were shown to initially reduce ecosystem carbon, but may provide for enhanced ecosystem carbon storage over the long term. We highlight currently available...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Park Science
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As an emblem of the Great Plains, American Indians, and wildlife conservation, the American bison (Bison bison) is one of the most visible and well-known of wildlife species in North America (fig. 1, above). Species of the genus Bison originally entered the continent via the Bering land bridge from northern Eurasia in the Illinoian glacial period of the Pleistocene epoch (125,000–500,000 years ago). Bison are the largest species in North America to have survived the late Pleistocene–early Holocene megafauna extinction period (around 9,000–11,000 years ago), but likely experienced a dramatic population reduction triggered by environmental changes and increased human hunting pressures around this time (Dary 1989;...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Park Science


map background search result map search result map Getting a Handle on Visitor Carrying Capacity - A Pilot Project at Arches National Park Estimating ecosystem carbon stocks at Redwood National and State Parks Getting a Handle on Visitor Carrying Capacity - A Pilot Project at Arches National Park Estimating ecosystem carbon stocks at Redwood National and State Parks