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Hawaiʻi is considered a worldwide biodiversity hotspot, with nearly 90 percent of its native plants found nowhere else in the world. However, about half of these native plants are imperiled by threats including human development, non-native species, and climate change. Through this project, scientists modeled the relative vulnerability of over 1,000 native plant species to the effects of climate change. A panel of experts in Hawaiian plant species assisted with the development of the model and verified its results. From the model, researchers were able to develop a vulnerability score for each plant species and identify categories of species with high, medium, and low vulnerability to climate change. This information...
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Landscape-scale conservation of threatened and endangered species is often challenged by multiple, sometimes conflicting, land uses. In Hawaiʻi, efforts to conserve native forests have come into conflict with objectives to sustain non-native game mammals, such as feral pigs, goats, and deer, for subsistence and sport hunting. Maintaining stable or increasing game populations represents one of the greatest obstacles to the recovery of Hawaii’s 425 threatened and endangered plant species. Many endemic Hawaiian species have declined and become endangered as a result of herbivorous non-native game mammals. Meanwhile, other environmental changes, including the spread of invasive grasses and changing precipitation patterns...
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The Pacific Ocean is home to a number of low-lying, coastal national parks and wildlife refuges. These public lands are situated on coral reef-lined islands that are susceptible to inundation from sea-level rise and flooding during storms. Because of their low-lying nature and limited availability of space, ecosystems, cultural resources, and infrastructure on these islands are particularly vulnerable to flooding. Sea-level rise will further exacerbate the impact of storms on island parks and refuges by increasing wave-driven coastal flooding, with consequences for ecological and human communities alike. However, most assessments of future conditions at coastal national parks and refuges consider only permanent...
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The beaches of the Hawaiian Islands attract nearly 9 million visitors each year, who inject around $15.6 billion into the state’s economy and support almost 200,000 jobs. Beyond their economic importance, Hawaiian beaches are also culturally and ecologically valuable. However, climate change driven sea-level rise is causing many beaches to disappear, endangering property, infrastructure, and critical habitats. The goal of this project was to develop a method for forecasting erosion-vulnerable beach areas that could be used in coastal management planning. Researchers focused on the island of Kauaʻi, modeling beach response to rising sea level over the next century and producing maps that provide information about...
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Loko iʻa (Hawaiian fishponds) are an advanced, extensive form of aquaculture found nowhere else in the world. Loko iʻa practices are the result of over a thousand years of intergenerational knowledge, experimentation, and adaptation, and once produced over 2 million pounds of fish per year throughout the Hawaiian Islands. These fishponds provided a consistent and diverse supply of fish when ocean fishing was not possible or did not yield enough supply. In many ways, loko iʻa are foundational to traditional aquaculture in Hawai‘i and have the potential to provide food security that contributes to greater coastal community resilience and economic autonomy. Today, changes in coastal and hydrological processes, including...
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Hawaiian shorelines and near-shore waters have long been used for cultural activities, food gathering and fishing, and recreation. As seascapes are physically altered by changing climate, the ways in which people experience these environments will likely change as well. Local perspectives of how seascapes are changing over time can help managers better understand and manage these areas for both natural persistence and human use. For this project, researchers conducted interviews and surveys of surfers and other ocean users to gather observations and perceptions of change over time at Hilo Bay, Hawaiʻi. They combined these results with historical data on public beach use and biophysical data from monitoring buoys...
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Located in the northern tropical Pacific Ocean, Majuro is the capital of the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Majuro Atoll consists of a large, narrow landmass and a set of smaller perimeter islands surrounding a lagoon that is over 100 square miles in size. The waters surrounding the Majuro Atoll land areas are relatively shallow with poorly mapped bathymetry. However, the Pacific Ocean on the exterior of the coral atoll and the lagoon within its interior consist of deep bathymetry with steep slopes. The highest elevation of the Majuro Atoll is estimated at only 3-meters above sea level, which is the island community of Laura located on the western part of the atoll. At the eastern edge of the atoll lies the capital...
Categories: Data; Tags: 3D Elevation Program, 3DEP, American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, Base Maps, Bathymetric, All tags...
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Low-lying island environments, such as the Majuro Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, are particularly vulnerable to inundation (coastal flooding) whether the increased water levels are from episodic events (storm surge, wave run-up, king tides) or from chronic conditions (long term sea-level rise). Land elevation is the primary geophysical variable that determines exposure to inundation in coastal settings. Accordingly, coastal elevation data are a critical input for assessments of inundation exposure and vulnerability. Previous research has demonstrated that the quality of data used for elevation-based assessments must be well understood and applied to properly model potential impacts. The vertical...
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This shapefile represents the spatial distribution of mean annual water-budget components, in inches, for the Island of Maui, Hawaii for a projected climate condition representative of phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) A1B 2080-99 scenario climate and 2017 land cover, as described in USGS SIR 2019-5064. The water-budget components for each model subarea were computed for the future climate condition using a water-budget model developed by Johnson and others (2018). The 2017 land-cover map developed by Mair (2018) was used to define the land-cover conditions and the model subareas. The shapefile attribute information associated with each subarea (or polygon) present an estimate of mean...
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These shapefiles represent the spatial distribution of mean annual water-budget components, in inches, for the Island of Maui, Hawaii for a set of eight future climate and land-cover scenarios. The future climate conditions used in the water-budget analyses were derived from two end-of-century downscaled climate projections including (1) a projected future climate condition representative of phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) A1B 2080-99 scenario climate described in Zhang and others (2016a, 2016b) and (2) a projected future climate condition representative of phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5) 2080-99 scenario...
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As a low-lying coastal nation, the Republic of the Marshall Islands is at the forefront of exposure to climate change impacts. The Republic of the Marshall Islands has a strong dependence on natural resources and biodiversity not only for food and income but also for culture and livelihood. However, these resources are threatened by rising sea levels and associated coastal hazards (storm surges, saltwater intrusion, erosion, etc.). High-quality data for atoll ‘ridge to reef’ (land and ocean) areas are needed to provide remote communities with the tools and strategies to make adaptation efforts before disasters occur. Although the Republic of the Marshall Islands’ National Strategic Plans recognize the need to...
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Biannual beach profiles were collected at 42 Oahu and 36 Maui Locationsbetween August 1994 and August 1999. Surveys were conducted atapproximately summer-winter intervals and extend from landward of the activebeach to about -4 meters water depth. Profile data on this CDROM arepresented in both Microsoft EXCEL 97/98 & 5.0/95 Workbook (.xls) format andcomma separated value (.csv) format. Graphical representation of the surveys (xvs. z and x vs. y) are presented in EXCEL format only. Site descriptions, includingbeach location, directions to site, GPS information, and a description ofReference Points used, are available in both EXCEL and ADOBE ACROBAT .pdfformat.
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Biannual beach profiles were collected at 42 Oahu and 36 Maui Locationsbetween August 1994 and August 1999. Surveys were conducted atapproximately summer-winter intervals and extend from landward of the activebeach to about -4 meters water depth. Profile data on this CDROM arepresented in both Microsoft EXCEL 97/98 & 5.0/95 Workbook (.xls) format andcomma separated value (.csv) format. Graphical representation of the surveys (xvs. z and x vs. y) are presented in EXCEL format only. Site descriptions, includingbeach location, directions to site, GPS information, and a description ofReference Points used, are available in both EXCEL and ADOBE ACROBAT .pdfformat.
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The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports that low-lying atolls (ring-shaped islands or island chains made of coral) in the Pacific Ocean are extremely vulnerable to high tide events (“king tides”), storm surge, tsunamis, and sea-level rise. The Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) spreads over 29 atolls and has a population of over 50,000 people with homes and communities that may be threatened by these climate change-related events. Policy makers, planners, and others within RMI are faced with decisions about how to prepare for the future and need scientific data and information about the vulnerability of Pacific Islands to potential climate change impacts like sea-level rise. Topographic and bathymetric...
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Haleakalā National Park (HNP) and the surrounding landscape spans many different land cover types, some of which are undergoing vegetation changes that can reduce the amount of water that infiltrates into soil. Decreased soil infiltration can lead to the erosion of terrestrial habitats, increases in the amount of sediment entering aquatic habitats, and flooding of downstream areas as runoff increases after storms. Currently, HNP managers are attempting to control runoff and erosion to avoid loss and damage within park boundaries and parks located downstream. Managers in HNP have expressed a need for information on current and future runoff and erosion risk to help prioritize management within the park and other...
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The conditions of coral reefs in the Hawaiian Islands are predicted to decline significantly from climate change over the next 100 years. To better prepare for the impacts of climate change on Hawaiian reefs, the research team uses a system of models to simulate ocean waves and circulation, rainfall and storm run-off, and coral reef community dynamics through the year 2100. These models will identify reef areas that are either vulnerable or resilient to the many stressors that the future may hold for reefs. The team’s hope is that this work can identify areas that might benefit from management actions to minimize local stressors such as land-based pollution. Through a collaborative partnership with state and federal...
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Coral ecosystems of West Maui support a vibrant tourism industry and provide tangible economic benefits to the community. Hawaiian nearshore reefs generate about $800 million in annual revenue, not including the ecosystem services they provide - such as critical habitat for diverse fish species and buffering coasts from storm surges. The Hawaiian economy depends on healthy coral ecosystems, yet reefs are currently facing multiple threats, including changing climate conditions, local land-based pollution, and sediment erosion. Erosion of soils into nearshore coastal zones is a chief concern facing land managers in West Maui. Intermittent rainfall can carry sediment from sources such as dirt roads, agricultural fields,...
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This shapefile represents the spatial distribution of mean annual water-budget components, in inches, for the Island of Maui, Hawaii for a projected climate condition representative of phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5) 2071-99 scenario rainfall and 2017 land cover, as described in USGS SIR 2019-5064. The water-budget components for each model subarea were computed for the future climate condition using a water-budget model developed by Johnson and others (2018). The 2017 land-cover map developed by Mair (2018) was used to define the land-cover conditions and the model subareas. The shapefile attribute information associated with each subarea...
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This shapefile represents the spatial distribution of mean annual water-budget components, in inches, for the Island of Maui, Hawaii. The water-budget components in the shapefile were computed by a water-budget model for a scenario representative of average climate conditions (1978–2007 rainfall) and 2010 land cover, as described in USGS SIR 2014-5168. The model was developed for estimating groundwater recharge and other water-budget components for each subarea of the model. The model subareas were generated using Esri ArcGIS software by intersecting (merging) multiple spatial data sets that characterize the spatial distribution of rainfall, fog interception, irrigation, reference evapotranspiration, direct runoff,...
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Alamagan Volcano is a Quaternary stratovolcano along the Mariana Arc, an active subduction zone in the western Pacific Ocean. Although primarily submerged, its peak reaches above sea level, with subaerially-exposed volcanic deposits dating back through the Holocene to the late Pleistocene. These feature data represent such deposits and other geologic features of Alamagan Volcano, describing its interpreted eruptive history.


map background search result map search result map Projections of Future Coral Reef Communities in DOI-Managed Coastal Areas in the Hawaiian Islands Establishing Climate Change Vulnerability Rankings for Hawaiian Native Plants Beach profile data for Maui, Hawaii Beach profile data for Oahu, Hawaii Forecasting Beach Loss from Sea-Level Rise on the Island of Kauaʻi Changing Hawaiian Seascapes and Their Management Implications Understanding Sediment Transport to Coastal Waters and Coral Reefs in West Maui Collecting Elevation Data to Understand Climate Change Effects in the Marshall Islands One Meter Topobathymetric Digital Elevation Model for Majuro Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, 1944 to 2016 Mean annual water-budget components for the Island of Maui, Hawaii, for average climate conditions, 1978-2007 rainfall and 2010 land cover (version 2.0) Identifying the Risk of Runoff and Erosion in Hawaiʻi’s National Parks Managing Non-native Game Mammals to Reduce Future Conflicts with Native Plant Conservation in Hawai‘i Inundation Exposure Assessment for Majuro Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands Science Needs Assessment to Support Management of Loko Iʻa (Hawaiian Fishpond) Resources and Practices Critical to the Native Hawaiian Community Mean annual water-budget components for the Island of Maui, Hawaii, for projected climate conditions, CMIP3 A1B 2080-99 scenario climate and 2017 land cover Mean annual water-budget components for the Island of Maui, Hawaii, for projected climate conditions, CMIP5 RCP8.5 2071-99 scenario rainfall and 2017 land cover The Impact of Climate Change and Sea-Level Rise on Future Flooding of Coastal Parks and Refuges in Hawaiʻi and the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands Mean annual water-budget components for the Island of Maui, Hawaii, for a set of eight future climate and land-cover scenarios Enhancing Stakeholder Capacity for Coastal Inundation Assessments in the Marshall Islands Alamagan Volcano - geochronologic points Alamagan Volcano - geochronologic points Understanding Sediment Transport to Coastal Waters and Coral Reefs in West Maui Inundation Exposure Assessment for Majuro Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands One Meter Topobathymetric Digital Elevation Model for Majuro Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, 1944 to 2016 Collecting Elevation Data to Understand Climate Change Effects in the Marshall Islands Forecasting Beach Loss from Sea-Level Rise on the Island of Kauaʻi Beach profile data for Oahu, Hawaii Changing Hawaiian Seascapes and Their Management Implications Projections of Future Coral Reef Communities in DOI-Managed Coastal Areas in the Hawaiian Islands Establishing Climate Change Vulnerability Rankings for Hawaiian Native Plants Enhancing Stakeholder Capacity for Coastal Inundation Assessments in the Marshall Islands Identifying the Risk of Runoff and Erosion in Hawaiʻi’s National Parks Science Needs Assessment to Support Management of Loko Iʻa (Hawaiian Fishpond) Resources and Practices Critical to the Native Hawaiian Community The Impact of Climate Change and Sea-Level Rise on Future Flooding of Coastal Parks and Refuges in Hawaiʻi and the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands