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We present an analysis of ozone (O-3) photochemistry observed by aircraft measurements of boreal biomass burning plumes over eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Measurements of O-3 and a number of key chemical species associated with O-3 photochemistry, including non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and total nitrogen containing species (NOy), were made from the UK FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft as part of the "quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites" (BORTAS) experiment between 12 July and 3 August 2011. The location and timing of the aircraft measurements put BORTAS into a unique position to sample biomass burning...
In Canada's subarctic?the boreal ecosystem that spans most of mainland Canada?the temperature is climbing, and the snowpack is thinning. Previous research has shown that snow is disappearing even faster than sea ice.
Correlation of geologic histories from 130 Alaskan glaciers with a record of solar variation suggests that multi-decadal to century-scale temperature variations in the North Pacific and Arctic sectors have been influenced by solar forcing over the past thousand years. Mountain glacier fluctuations are primarily a record of summer cooling and the composite glacial history from three climatic regions across Alaska shows ice expansions approximately every 200 years, compatible with a solar mode of variability. The modulating effects of the cold phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the Arctic Oscillation may, when in phase with decreased solar activity, serve to amplify cooling, forcing glacier advance.
Scientific articles on work being done in the Alaska parks - subjects are:Vast and Unique Beringia; Environmental Sustainability and Change; Climate Change; Tourism; Outreach and Education
Changes are occurring in America's Arctic. Chemicals rarely used in the Arctic are appearing in Alaska's air, water, fish, plants, and wildlife. These contaminants are of concern locally and globally. Locally, fish and wildlife are an essential part of the Alaskan Native diet and culture. Globally, this unanticipated concentration of pollutants may be sending an important message about how contaminants travel and accumulate far from the original source. The presence of environmental pollutants in the Arctic is particularly troubling because the Arctic ecosystem is fragile and slow to recover from impacts. The contaminants of greatest concern are persistent organic pollutants, or POPs. These include DDT, PCBs, and...
1.?Mixed-wood boreal forests are often considered to undergo directional succession from shade-intolerant to shade-tolerant species. It is thus expected that overstorey gaps should lead to the recruitment of shade-tolerant conifers into the canopy in all stand development stages and that the recruitment of shade-intolerant hardwoods would be minimal except in the largest gaps. 2.?We analysed short-term gap dynamics over a large 6-km2 spatial area of mixed-wood boreal forest across a gradient of stands in different developmental stages with different times of origin since fire (expressed as stand ?age?) that were affected differentially by the last spruce budworm (SBW) outbreak. Structural measurements of the canopy...


map background search result map search result map Health Impact Assessment for Proposed Coal Mine at Wishbone Hill, Matanuska-Susitna Borough Alaska. Prepared For: Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Health Impact Assessment Program Health Impact Assessment for Proposed Coal Mine at Wishbone Hill, Matanuska-Susitna Borough Alaska. Prepared For: Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Health Impact Assessment Program