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Abstract (from http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/cjfas-2013-0535#.VC1mIPldXOE): Cold-water habitat in lakes is projected to decrease under future climate scenarios, and existing trends suggest such declines are already impacting cold-water fish populations. Herein, we predict the effects of future climate and land use change on cold-water fish habitat in the glacial lakes of the upper midwestern US. Ecoregion-specific, regional regression models were developed to predict annual phosphorus loading rates to lakes based on land use and hydrology and coupled to a previously developed fish habitat model. Outputs from one land use change model and three global climate models were then used to project future...
Abstract (from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/eff.12084/abstract): Smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu, SMB) is a broadly distributed, economically important species in the USA and Canada. Although previous research has suggested that projected climate warming may allow SMB to thrive beyond their current northern distribution, little research has been devoted to the population-level effects of climate change on warm-water fishes, including SMB. We modelled the impacts of projected climate change on growth of stream-dwelling SMB along a north–south gradient in the central USA. Using downscaled regional projections from three global climate models, we generated scenarios for thermal habitat change for...
Abstract (from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02755947.2016.1146179): Over the last decade, the abundance of Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoideshas increased in many northern Wisconsin lakes, causing concern among anglers and biologists regarding the potential for Largemouth Bass to negatively affect populations of Walleye Sander vitreus through predation or competition for prey. Our objectives were to determine whether (1) diet overlap and predation occurred between adult Walleyes and Largemouth Bass in four northern Wisconsin lakes and (2) the use of DNA barcoding to reduce unidentifiable fish in diet samples affected conclusions regarding diet overlap. A single occurrence of Walleye predation was...
The Department of the Interior Climate Science Centers (CSCs) and their managing organization, the National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center at the U.S. Geological Survey, have chosen the emerging climate science field of Ecological Drought as a research focus area. However, there is currently no working framework for drought-induced ecological impacts, and drought planning capabilities are needed for biodiversity conservation and the ecosystem services that natural areas provide. This newsletter summarizes discussions from a workshop held in the North Central region in December 2015. This workshop is part of a series of meetings at each of the nation’s eight CSCs aimed at collating our existing knowledge...
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Marine and inland fisheries provide substantial economic, nutritional, recreational, and cultural benefits to human populations globally. Though extensive research and management efforts exist to ensure the sustainability of these important resources, many fisheries still face threats including climate change, habitat degradation, and overfishing. The inland fisheries community often cites that less attention is given to inland fisheries compared to marine but, to date, no quantitative analysis has examined these differences. Our goal is to compare investment and resources allocated to the research and management of marine and inland fisheries relative to their value at a global scale. Through the development of...
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The Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data of the nearshore region of the North Pacific show temperature ranges in degrees C using points whose locations correspond to the centroids of AVHRR Pathfinder version 5 monthly, global, 4 km data set (PFSST V50). The pathfinder rasters are available from the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC), hosted by NASA JPL. The data points in this dataset lie within a 20 km buffer from the GSHHS (Global Self-consistent, Hierarchical, High-resolution Shoreline) coastline. The GSHHS vector data are available from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC). Furthermore, each point in the SST dataset is categorized by the ecoregion in which it is located. This...
The “Sea‐Level Affecting Marshes Model” (SLAMM) is a moderate resolution model used to predict the effects of sea level rise on marsh habitats (Craft et al. 2009). SLAMM has been used extensively on both the west coast (e.g., Glick et al., 2007) and east coast (e.g., Geselbracht et al., 2011) of the United States to evaluate potential changes in the distribution and extent of tidal marsh habitats. However, a limitation of the current version of SLAMM, (Version 6.2) is that it lacks the ability to model distribution changes in seagrass habitat resulting from sea level rise. Because of the ecological importance of SAV habitats, the US Environmental Protection Agency, US Geological Survey, and US Department of Agriculture...
The Climate Adaptation Science Center (CASC) Network has chosen the emerging climate science field of Ecological Drought as a research focus area. The U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) falls within the domain of the Pacific Islands CASC. This workshop was an add-on to the eight Ecological Drought Workshops (each hosted by a different CASC), so that additional attention could be directed towards the topic of drought in island environments, and the unique challenges that drought poses to island communities.
Abstract (from ScienceDirect): We present the first high resolution (1:20,000) river centerlines shapefiles from 50 large rivers across the world. Rivers were selected based on the criteria of having more than 1000 km length and which have been reported to have a significant contribution to global fishery production. Since large rivers often span multiple countries, the degree of changes (i.e., anthropogenic or climate derived) varies from region to region. These high-resolution layers were developed to enable researchers to delineate accurate river length, from headwaters regions to their delta and assess or visualize the ongoing changes more accurately in these river systems. Further, these polylines could be...
The USGS National Climate Adaptation Science Center (NCASC) is currently engaged in an Ecological Drought initiative, focused on understanding the impacts of drought on natural ecosystems across the country. This project supported the Ecological Drought initiative by creating an Intermountain West Drought Social Science Synthesis Working Group. The goal of this working group was to investigate human dimensions of ecological drought across the intermountain west from a comparative, regional perspective. Throughout the Intermountain West, there has been significant investment in understanding how social factors influence manager and citizen experiences of drought in particular locations. Yet there is still a gap in...
Water resource managers face the complex challenge of balancing water allocation between human and environmental needs. Declining water availability in many regions globally is driven by over- allocation and usage by municipal and agricultural users and climate-driven changes in rainfall. At the same time, environmental flows in rivers and streams that sustain fish and other aquatic life are decreasing for the same reasons. Because freshwater species’ populations are declining rapidly, it is increasingly important to balance between human and environmental water needs. However, there are significant barriers and socio-political issues that prevent water from being allocated to conserve freshwater ecosystems. This...
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Abstract (from http://www.springerplus.com/content/3/1/589): The growing quality and availability of spatial map layers (e.g., climate, geology, and land use) allow stream studies, which historically have occurred over small areas like a single watershed or stream reach, to increasingly explore questions from a landscape perspective. This large-scale perspective for fluvial studies depends on the ability to characterize influences on streams resulting from throughout entire upstream networks or catchments. While acquiring upstream information for a single reach is relatively straight-forward, this process becomes demanding when attempting to obtain summaries for all streams throughout a stream network and across...
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Moose are an economically and culturally important species in Minnesota. Like many species, however, moose are experiencing reductions in distribution and abundance across the Midwest as a result of climate change and habitat loss. Moose populations have declined by 60% since 2006, in part because of thermal heat stress in warming summers and increased frequency of contact with white-tailed deer that transmit fatal parasites. Forest managers are looking for actionable strategies to improve moose habitat in the near-term while also planning for future forest conditions in a warming climate. To address this need, this project brings together researchers and managers to examine how climate adaptive forest management...
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Many animal species have unique characteristics that allow them to survive during winter. For example, the snowshoe hare changes its fur color from brown to white to camouflage better in winter months, and the ruffed grouse roosts under the snow to stay warm and hidden in winter. These winter-adapted species, however, are facing new challenges as climate change is resulting in shorter winters and rapid declines in snowpack. Shorter winters pose a significant threat to winter-adapted species that are used to living in, under, or on top of a protective blanket of snow. Wildlife managers are tasked with conserving these species, yet studies understanding how specific management actions can enhance species' ability...
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The goal of the glacial lakes regional study was to predict the impacts of climate and land use change on coldwater fish habitat in the glacial lakes region, which covers most of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan. The study includes both top-level, regional analyses and more detailed case studies of individual lakes. The goal of this project was to provide (1) projections of land use and climate change impacts on the trophic status of Midwestern coldwater glacial lakes, (2) projections of land use and climate change impacts on the regional distribution of coldwater lake oxythermal habitat, and (3) guidance on the types of coldwater lakes in which locations will be the most or least vulnerable to land use and climate...


map background search result map search result map Predicting Coldwater Fish Habitat in Lakes of the Glacial Lakes Region under Changing Land Use and Climate Regimes (Local Assessment) An approach for aggregating upstream catchment information to support research and management of fluvial systems across large landscapes A Value and Investment Assessment of Marine and Inland Fisheries Globally to Inform Future Resource Management Strategies Managing and Promoting the Resiliency of Winter-Adapted Species to Climate Change Can Climate Change Mitigation Through Forest Management Save the Moose in Minnesota? Can Climate Change Mitigation Through Forest Management Save the Moose in Minnesota? Predicting Coldwater Fish Habitat in Lakes of the Glacial Lakes Region under Changing Land Use and Climate Regimes (Local Assessment) Managing and Promoting the Resiliency of Winter-Adapted Species to Climate Change An approach for aggregating upstream catchment information to support research and management of fluvial systems across large landscapes A Value and Investment Assessment of Marine and Inland Fisheries Globally to Inform Future Resource Management Strategies