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View across Nisqually Glacier in series 14-W (profile 2) used to determine slope and changes in ice thickness. The glacier surface in this area has become much rougher since 1952 and the streak of white (clear) ice is now hidden behind the thickened zone of crevassed, debris-covered ice. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. September 8, 1960. Panorama in two parts. (see vfm00012) Figure 9, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 631.
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Nisqually Glacier, from confluence with Wilson Glacier to the nunatak, as seen from station 7 on August 22, 1945. Upper part of glacier is at about its lowest known ice mass, as evidenced by the exposure of bedrock. There is almost no crevassing in middle reach. Slope at center of photo is very flat and broken below there. Note the lightcolored medial moraine approaching nunatak from upper right. Sources of debris may be deduced. Note also large icecored moraine along wrest edge of glacier. Mount Rainier National Park. Pierce County, Washington. August 22, 1945. Panoram in two parts. Photo 3 and 4. (see vfm00004) Published as figure 4 in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional paper 631. 1969.
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Upper reaches of Nisaqually and Wilson Glaciers as seen from station 13 on August 30, 1957. Most of exposed bedrock areas marked in photo no. 18 are now covered by Wilson Glacier. Glacier surface at profile 3 is only 3 feet (1 m) higher than in 1949, but near left edge of picture it probably is about 60 feet (18 m) higher because at profile 2 the ice level rose 97 feet (30 m) from 1949 to 1957. The crevassing appears much coarser (rougher) now and extends to the east edge of the glacier. Exposed face of the ice field above the cliff is thicker. The falls at far left are nearly dry (compare with photo no. 18). Note the different layers (ages) of firn exposed in the small area at lower right, which can be differentiated...
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Album Caption: Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. Aerial view of down-valley part of avalanche deposits. Rock fragment shown in photo is circled. Photo by A.S. Post, August 20, 1964. Pierce County, Washington. Published in U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1221-A, figure 6. 1965.
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Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. Lower part of Nisqually Glacier as seen from station 5 . The upper portion of the glacier is 7 feet (2 meters) higher than in 1959 (photo vfm00026), and since then the glacier has thickened 22 feet (7 meters) lower down and 24 feet (7 meters) toward the bottom of the glacier. The broad bulge of thickening is visible in midglacier in its center portion. The nunatak has been topped by flowing ice. Dead ice downstream has receded considerably since 1959, but now previously stagnant ice in midchannel is thickened and has been incorporated into the advancing terminus. September 8, 1962. Figure 24, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 631.
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Lower part of Nisqually Glacier as seen from station 5. With respect to its 1962 condition (photo vfm00027), the glacier has gained 3 feet (1 meter) in thickness in the upper area and lost 5 feet (2 meters) lower down. However, toward the bottom, the thickness has increased 34 feet (10 meters). The preliminary result now available for the 1966 survey shows that 1965 was a peak year at the bottom of the glacier. The vigorous terminal reach and snout of the glacier have completely covered or incorporated all vestiges of stagnant ice. The nunatak is almost entirely engulfed. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. August 30, 1965. Figure 25, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 631.
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Nisqaully Glacier ice margins around the nunatak for selected years in the period 1942-65. The down-glacier part of the 1942, 1961, and 1965 lines are indeterminate because the ice is obscured by debris. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. August 22, 1951. Figure 13, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 631.
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Comma-separated values (.csv) file containing data related to mercury concentrations in dragonfly samples from U.S. National Parks collected as part of the Dragonfly Mercury Project (DMP). This data release supersedes Eagles-Smith, C.A., Nelson, S.J., Flanagan-Pritz, C.M., Willacker Jr., J.J., and Klemmer, A.J., 2018, Total mercury concentrations in dragonfly larvae from U.S. national parks (ver. 8.0, December 2022): U.S. Geological Survey data release, https://doi.org/10.5066/P9TK6NPT. Please contact fresc_outreach@usgs.gov for access.
Categories: Data, Data Release - Revised; Tags: Acadia National Park, Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site, Amistad National Recreation Area, Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, All tags...
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Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. Trees are sampled at the lowest possible level to determine their age. The date is obtained by subtracting the number of annual rings in a complete sample from the number of the year after the outer ring was formed. The next year must be used, for although the last year of growth of a tree is not complete by midsummer, for dating purposes the outer ring and growth year are complete. Carbon Glacier started to recede from here about 1845. Figure 2, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 387-B.
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Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. End of the moraine from which Carbon Glacier started to recede about 1760, viewed from Wonderland Trail. The glacier is to the south about three-quarters of a mile. September 10, 1968. Plate 5, Figure 5, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 387-B. Photos srs00049 and srs00050 form a panorama.
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Album CAption: Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. Outcrop of a relatively fine-grained facies of the bomb-bearing block-and-ash flow along the West Side Road near the South Puyallup River. A large breadcrust bomb is just left of the pick, but most other rock fragments are of dense rock. Circa 1964. Pierce County, Washington. Published in U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 677, figure 34. 1971.
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South wall of Little Tahoma Peak, about 400 feet below its summit. Mudflow breccias enclosing streaks, lenses, and tongues of partly brecciated lava. Such mixed accumulations of lava and breccia probably formed from thin lava streams that were shattered by steam explosions as they glided down steep slopes and mixed with mud, slushy snow and melt water. The dips are primary and are as much as 30 degrees. The cliff is about 100 feet high. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. ca. 1959. Figure 51, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 444.
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Nisqually Valley below Nisqually Glacier, as seen from station 3 in 1934 prior to the October flood (date estimated). Note the substantial stand of trees and brush on the west part of the flood plain and the river on the east side of the flood plain. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. Photo by USGS Conservation Division, 1934. Panorama in two parts. Photo 46 and 47. (seevfm00047) Figure 36, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 631.
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Nisqually Glacier, from confluence with Wilson Glacier to the nunatak, as seen from station 7 on August 22, 1945. Upper part of glacier is at about its lowest known ice mass, as evidenced by the exposure of bedrock. There is almost no crevassing in middle reach. Slope at center of photo is very flat and broken below there. Note the lightcolored medial moraine approaching nunatak from upper right. Sources of debris may be deduced. Note also large ice-cored moraine along wrest edge of glacier. Mount Rainier National Park. Pierce County, Washington. August 22, 1945. Panorama in two parts. Photo 3 and 4. (see vfm00003) Published as figure 4 in U.S. Geological Survey. Professional paper 631. 1969.
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Carbon River Glacier. Ice domes and cascades in the great northern amphitheater from the marginal moraine on the northeast. Mount Rainier National Park. Pierce County, Washington. July 1896.
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Carbon River Glacier. Grassy slope and ice cascade below the great northern amphitheater. Mount Rainier National Park. Pierce County, Washington. July 1896.
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Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. Fromm the southeast of Cowlitz Glacier and Mount Rainier. September 1964.
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Lower part of the basal ash flow in the Stevens Ridge Formation on Backbone Ridge. The light-colored ash flow churned through soft saprolite on the pre-Stevens Ridge land surface and included fragments of the saprolite and less-weathered Ohanapecosh rocks in the lower 8 feet of the deposit. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. ca. 1959. Figure 22, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 444.
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Album Caption: Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. Bomb-bearing block-and-ash flow deposit in an outcrop along the West Side Road near the South Puyallup River overlies a coarse lahar that does not contain any bombs. The contact is marked by a thin horizontal layer of light gray sand. Circa 1964. Published in U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 677, figure 33. 1971.
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River channel just above the highway bridge, viewed downstream from a cliff. In the 9-year interval since 1956, note the following: 1., the exceptionally large boulder at the left has not moved; 2., small terraces are visible at the left, caused by moderate-sized floods; 3., an alluvial fan (first visible in 1960) has been deposited by a right bank tributary on this side of the bridge. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. August 31, 1965. Panorama in three parts. Photo 49, 51 and 52. (see vfm00049 and vfm00051) Figure 39-D, U.S. Geological Survey Professional paper 631.


map background search result map search result map Bomb-bearing block-and-ash flow deposit, West Side Road, South Puyallup River, Mount Rainier National Park, Pierce County, Washington. 1964. Bomb-bearing block-and-ash flow, West Side Road, South Puyallup River, Mount Rainier National Park, Pierce County, Washington. 1964. Basal ash flow in the Stevens Ridge Formation on Backbone Ridge. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. ca. 1959. South wall of Little Tahoma Peak. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. ca. 1959. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. Fromm the southeast of Cowlitz Glacier and Mount Rainier. September 1964. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. Trees are sampled at the lowest possible level to determine their age. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. End of the moraine from which Carbon Glacier started to recede about 1760, viewed from Wonderland Trail. Nisqually Glacier. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. 1945. (Panoram in two parts.) Nisqually Glacier. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. 1945. (Panorama in two parts.) Nisqaully Glacier. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. 1951. View across Nisqually Glacier. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. 1960. (Panorama in two parts.) Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. Lower part of Nisqually Glacier as seen from station 5 . Lower part of Nisqually Glacier. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. 1965. Upper reaches of Nisaqually and Wilson Glaciers. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. 1957. (Panorama in two parts.) Nisqually Valley below Nisqually Glacier. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. 1934. (Panorama in two parts.) River channel just above the highway bridge. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington.1965. (Panorama in three parts.) Carbon River Glacier. Grassy slope and ice cascade below the great northern amphitheater. Carbon River Glacier. Ice domes and cascades in the great northern amphitheater from the marginal moraine on the northeast. Total mercury concentrations in dragonfly larvae from U.S. national parks (ver. 9.0, November 2023) Bomb-bearing block-and-ash flow deposit, West Side Road, South Puyallup River, Mount Rainier National Park, Pierce County, Washington. 1964. Bomb-bearing block-and-ash flow, West Side Road, South Puyallup River, Mount Rainier National Park, Pierce County, Washington. 1964. Basal ash flow in the Stevens Ridge Formation on Backbone Ridge. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. ca. 1959. South wall of Little Tahoma Peak. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. ca. 1959. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. Fromm the southeast of Cowlitz Glacier and Mount Rainier. September 1964. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. Trees are sampled at the lowest possible level to determine their age. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. End of the moraine from which Carbon Glacier started to recede about 1760, viewed from Wonderland Trail. Nisqaully Glacier. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. 1951. View across Nisqually Glacier. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. 1960. (Panorama in two parts.) Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. Lower part of Nisqually Glacier as seen from station 5 . Lower part of Nisqually Glacier. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. 1965. Upper reaches of Nisaqually and Wilson Glaciers. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. 1957. (Panorama in two parts.) Nisqually Valley below Nisqually Glacier. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. 1934. (Panorama in two parts.) River channel just above the highway bridge. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington.1965. (Panorama in three parts.) Carbon River Glacier. Grassy slope and ice cascade below the great northern amphitheater. Carbon River Glacier. Ice domes and cascades in the great northern amphitheater from the marginal moraine on the northeast. Nisqually Glacier. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. 1945. (Panoram in two parts.) Nisqually Glacier. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington. 1945. (Panorama in two parts.) Total mercury concentrations in dragonfly larvae from U.S. national parks (ver. 9.0, November 2023)