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Filters: Tags: Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum, Brigham Young University (X)

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We examined the biogeography of aquatic and semiaquatic Heteroptera (ASH) in the Grand Canyon (GC) ecoregion (GCE) on and adjacent to the southern Colorado Plateau. We report 89 ASH taxa in 86 species, 37 genera, and 14 families in the GCE, including 54 ASH taxa detected within or on the rims of GC and its major tributaries, a fauna 3.8-fold greater than previously reported. We tested 2 groups of biogeographic hypotheses to account for this high level of diversity, demonstrating an underlying pattern of mixed biogeographic affinity and strong landform-climate effects. Equal numbers of ASH taxa were derived from allochthonous (neotropical and nearctic) sources and autochthonous (range-centered) sources. A negative...
Southern Utah comprises 4 major physiographic divisions: the Great Basin, Colorado Plateau, Central Rocky Mountains, and Southern Rocky Mountains, which have been partitioned into faunal regions. We discuss the uniqueness of southern Utah and the amount of land set aside for recreation and preservation, and we encourage the study and preservation of its water resources. The stonefly (Plecoptera) fauna of 13 counties in southern Utah was surveyed. We found 58 species representing 34 genera and 8 families. Three new state records for Utah and many new county records for southern Utah are presented, along with a discussion of distribution patterns and faunal affinities of each species. Distribution patterns indicate...
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Information is presented dealing with the western North American species of the subfamily Donaciinae, with emphasis on data from the state of Utah. Dichotomous keys and short diagnoses are provided to enable identification of genera and species. Previously published records from Utah are summarized. For each species, the overall North American distribution is summarized, and detailed records are given for Utah. Reported host plants for each species are also listed. Published in Monographs of the Western North American Naturalist, volume 4, issue 1, on pages 1 - 37, in 2008.
Biological invasions are one of the greatest threats to native species in natural ecological systems. One of the most successful invasive species is Bromus tectorum L. (cheatgrass), which is having marked impacts on native plant communities and ecosystem processes. However, we know little about the effects of this invasion on native animal species in the Intermountain West. Because ants have been used to detect ecological change associated with anthropogenic land use, they seem well suited for a preliminary evaluation of the consequences of cheatgrass-driven habitat conversion. In our study, we used pitfall traps to assess ant community assemblages in intact sagebrush and nearby cheatgrass-dominated vegetation....
Mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. vaseyana) covers large areas in arid regions of western North America. Climate-change models predict a decrease in the range of sagebrush, but few studies have examined details of predicted changes on sagebrush growth and the potential impacts of these changes on the community. We analyzed effects of temperature, precipitation, and snow depth on sagebrush annual ring width for 1969 to 2007 in the Gunnison Basin of Colorado. Temperature at all times of year except winter had negative correlations with ring widths; summer temperature had the strongest negative relationship. Ring widths correlated positively with precipitation in various seasons except summer;...
This is the first treatment of the mammals of the Grand Staircase?Escalante National Monument (GSENM). GSENM was established in 1996 as a 1.7-million-acre (680,000-ha) federal land reserve under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). To successfully manage this new monument, the BLM is presently developing a management action plan. To provide information for the proper management of mammal species of the area, we have reviewed background literature for each mammal potentially found within the Monument boundaries. We propose that a core area, surrounded by a buffer matrix, be used in GSENM and surrounding public lands to preserve ecological processes in their natural state. One hundred thirteen...
Field collections at more than 2900 sites and the examination of many museum collections and literature allowed me to map the historical and current distribution of several freshwater molluscan faunal groups in the Intermountain region of the United States (Great Basin, Colorado River drainage basin, and upper Snake River sub-basin). Historical and current records show that Margaritifera falcata, Anodonta californiensis, and Ferrissia rivularis have drainage-specific distributions, while Valvata utahensis has a specific drainage pattern, and V. californica (new combination) has a dispersed pattern. Shell morphometric data of Valvata and Ferrissia show extensive shell variation between and within populations. Current...
Only a single previous study has examined ectoparasites of the occult bat (Myotis occultus), from which only 2 species of fleas were identified. For our study, we examined 202 individuals, 52 fresh hosts and 150 museum specimens, from New Mexico and southern Colorado for ectoparasites. We recorded 2158 ectoparasites, 634 from fresh hosts and 1524 from museum specimens. Ectoparasites belonged to 10 families and 13 genera of insect or acari and represent new host and locality records. In general, ectoparasites collected from fresh hosts and museum specimens were represented by 4 major species of mite: Macronyssus crosbyi, Alabidocarpus calcaratus, Acanthophthirius lucifugus, and Alabidocarpus nr. eptesicus. From our...
This is the first treatment of the mammals of the Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument (GSENM). GSENM was established in 1996 as a 1.7-million-acre (680,000-ha) federal land reserve under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). To successfully manage this new monument, the BLM is presently developing a management action plan. To provide information for the proper management of mammal species of the area, we have reviewed background literature for each mammal potentially found within the Monument boundaries. We propose that a core area, surrounded by a buffer matrix, be used in GSENM and surrounding public lands to preserve ecological processes in their natural state. One hundred thirteen...
This is the first treatment of the mammals of the Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument (GSENM). GSENM was established in 1996 as a 1.7-million-acre (680,000-ha) federal land reserve under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). To successfully manage this new monument, the BLM is presently developing a management action plan. To provide information for the proper management of mammal species of the area, we have reviewed background literature for each mammal potentially found within the Monument boundaries. We propose that a core area, surrounded by a buffer matrix, be used in GSENM and surrounding public lands to preserve ecological processes in their natural state. One hundred thirteen...


    map background search result map search result map The Subfamily Donaciinae In Utah (Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) The Subfamily Donaciinae In Utah (Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)