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We examined the biogeography of aquatic and semiaquatic Heteroptera (ASH) in the Grand Canyon (GC) ecoregion (GCE) on and adjacent to the southern Colorado Plateau. We report 89 ASH taxa in 86 species, 37 genera, and 14 families in the GCE, including 54 ASH taxa detected within or on the rims of GC and its major tributaries, a fauna 3.8-fold greater than previously reported. We tested 2 groups of biogeographic hypotheses to account for this high level of diversity, demonstrating an underlying pattern of mixed biogeographic affinity and strong landform-climate effects. Equal numbers of ASH taxa were derived from allochthonous (neotropical and nearctic) sources and autochthonous (range-centered) sources. A negative...
Southern Utah comprises 4 major physiographic divisions: the Great Basin, Colorado Plateau, Central Rocky Mountains, and Southern Rocky Mountains, which have been partitioned into faunal regions. We discuss the uniqueness of southern Utah and the amount of land set aside for recreation and preservation, and we encourage the study and preservation of its water resources. The stonefly (Plecoptera) fauna of 13 counties in southern Utah was surveyed. We found 58 species representing 34 genera and 8 families. Three new state records for Utah and many new county records for southern Utah are presented, along with a discussion of distribution patterns and faunal affinities of each species. Distribution patterns indicate...
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Information is presented dealing with the western North American species of the subfamily Donaciinae, with emphasis on data from the state of Utah. Dichotomous keys and short diagnoses are provided to enable identification of genera and species. Previously published records from Utah are summarized. For each species, the overall North American distribution is summarized, and detailed records are given for Utah. Reported host plants for each species are also listed. Published in Monographs of the Western North American Naturalist, volume 4, issue 1, on pages 1 - 37, in 2008.
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San Miguel Island is the westernmost of the California Channel Islands and one of the windiest areas on the west coast of North America. The majority of the island is covered by coastal sand dunes, which were stripped of vegetation and subsequently mobilized due to droughts and sheep ranching during the late 19th century and early 20th century. Since the removal of grazing animals, vegetation and biological soil crusts have once again stabilized many of the island's dunes. In this study, historical aerial photographs and field surveys were used to develop a chronosequence of the pattern of change in vegetation communities and biological soil crust levels of development (LOD) along a gradient of dune stabilization....
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Over a span of 50 years, native Californian Donald Lee Johnson made a number of memorable contributions to our understanding of the California Channel Islands. Among these are (1) recognizing that carbonate dunes, often cemented into eolianite and derived from offshore shelf sediments during lowered sea level, are markers of glacial periods on the Channel Islands; (2) identifying beach rock on the Channel Islands as the northernmost occurrence of this feature on the Pacific Coast of North America; (3) recognizing of the role of human activities in historic landscape modification; (4) identifying both the biogenic and pedogenic origins of caliche “ghost forests” and laminar calcrete forms on the Channel Islands;...
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Marine invertebrate faunas with mixtures of extralimital southern and extralimital northern faunal elements, called thermally anomalous faunas, have been recognized for more than a century in the Quaternary marine terrace record of the Pacific Coast of North America. Although many mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, no single explanation seems to be applicable to all localities where thermally anomalous faunas have been observed. Here, we describe one such thermally anomalous fossil fauna that was studied on the second emergent marine terrace at Eel Point on San Clemente Island. The Eel Point terrace complex is a composite feature, consisting of a narrow upper bench (terrace 2a) and a broader...
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Understanding how early humans on the California Channel Islands might have changed local fire regimes requires a baseline knowledge of the frequency of natural wildfires on the islands prior to human occupation. A sedimentary sequence that was recently discovered in a small canyon on San Nicolas Island contains evidence of at least 24 burn events that date to between ~37 and 25 ka (thousands of calibrated 14C years before present), well before humans entered North America. The evidence includes abundant macroscopic charcoal, blackened sediments, and discrete packages of oxidized, reddish-brown sediments that are similar in appearance to sedimentary features called “fire areas” on Santa Rosa Island and elsewhere....
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We determined the bat fauna at Mesa Verde National Park (Mesa Verde) in 2006 and 2007, characterized bat elevational distribution and reproduction, and investigated roosting habits of selected species. We captured 1996 bats of 15 species in mist nets set over water during 120 nights of sampling and recorded echolocation calls of an additional species. The bat fauna at Mesa Verde included every species of bat known west of the Great Plains in Colorado, except the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus). Some species showed skewed sex ratios, primarily due to a preponderance of males. Thirteen species of bats reproduced at Mesa Verde. Major differences in spring precipitation between the 2 years of our study were associated...
This is the first treatment of the mammals of the Grand Staircase?Escalante National Monument (GSENM). GSENM was established in 1996 as a 1.7-million-acre (680,000-ha) federal land reserve under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). To successfully manage this new monument, the BLM is presently developing a management action plan. To provide information for the proper management of mammal species of the area, we have reviewed background literature for each mammal potentially found within the Monument boundaries. We propose that a core area, surrounded by a buffer matrix, be used in GSENM and surrounding public lands to preserve ecological processes in their natural state. One hundred thirteen...
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Santa Cruz Island is the largest of the California Channel Islands and supports a diverse and unique flora which includes 9 federally listed species. Sheep, cattle, and pigs, introduced to the island in the mid-1800s, disturbed the soil, browsed native vegetation, and facilitated the spread of exotic invasive plants. Recent removal of introduced herbivores on the island led to the release of invasive fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), which expanded to become the dominant vegetation in some areas and has impeded the recovery of some native plant communities. In 2007, Channel Islands National Park initiated a program to control fennel using triclopyr on the eastern 10% of the island. We established replicate paired plots...
Field collections at more than 2900 sites and the examination of many museum collections and literature allowed me to map the historical and current distribution of several freshwater molluscan faunal groups in the Intermountain region of the United States (Great Basin, Colorado River drainage basin, and upper Snake River sub-basin). Historical and current records show that Margaritifera falcata, Anodonta californiensis, and Ferrissia rivularis have drainage-specific distributions, while Valvata utahensis has a specific drainage pattern, and V. californica (new combination) has a dispersed pattern. Shell morphometric data of Valvata and Ferrissia show extensive shell variation between and within populations. Current...
This is the first treatment of the mammals of the Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument (GSENM). GSENM was established in 1996 as a 1.7-million-acre (680,000-ha) federal land reserve under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). To successfully manage this new monument, the BLM is presently developing a management action plan. To provide information for the proper management of mammal species of the area, we have reviewed background literature for each mammal potentially found within the Monument boundaries. We propose that a core area, surrounded by a buffer matrix, be used in GSENM and surrounding public lands to preserve ecological processes in their natural state. One hundred thirteen...
This is the first treatment of the mammals of the Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument (GSENM). GSENM was established in 1996 as a 1.7-million-acre (680,000-ha) federal land reserve under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). To successfully manage this new monument, the BLM is presently developing a management action plan. To provide information for the proper management of mammal species of the area, we have reviewed background literature for each mammal potentially found within the Monument boundaries. We propose that a core area, surrounded by a buffer matrix, be used in GSENM and surrounding public lands to preserve ecological processes in their natural state. One hundred thirteen...


    map background search result map search result map The Subfamily Donaciinae In Utah (Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Evidence of repeated wildfires prior to human occupation on San Nicolas Island, California The contributions of Donald Lee Johnson to understanding the Quaternary geologic and biogeographic history of the California Channel Islands Interpreting the paleozoogeography and sea level history of thermally anomalous marine terrace faunas: a case study from the the Last Interglacial Complex of San Clemente Island, California The contributions of Donald Lee Johnson to understanding the Quaternary geologic and biogeographic history of the California Channel Islands Evidence of repeated wildfires prior to human occupation on San Nicolas Island, California Interpreting the paleozoogeography and sea level history of thermally anomalous marine terrace faunas: a case study from the the Last Interglacial Complex of San Clemente Island, California The Subfamily Donaciinae In Utah (Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)