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Experiments have been conducted with a regional climate model to indicate the conditions required to generate preferred regions of frontal activity in the Alaskan region. Several objective methods of frontal identification were first investigated. It was found that· the vertical component of relative vorticity,· a thermal front parameter -&nablaB;|&nablaB;Tsub 850] | · n, where Tsub 850] is the 850-hPa temperature and n is a unit vector in the direction of the 850-hPa temperature gradient, and· a parameter derived from the Q vector as a measure of vertical motionwere useful in combination to determine the occurrence of fronts. The preferred locations for frontal activity were located to the southern side of the...
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The Central Alaska Network is part of the National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring Program. It is composed of three national park units: Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Denali National Park and Preserve, and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve. The Inventory and Monitoring Program is the result of the National Parks Omnibus Management Act, which was passed by Congress in1998. This act directs the National Park Service “to establish baseline [resource] information and to provide information on the long-term trends in the condition of National Park System resources.” The primary goal of the Central Alaska Network is to build a holistic picture of change across the ecosystems of the network...
Using maximum latewood density data from a network of coniferous trees, annually resolved series of average summer half-year (April?September) temperatures have been reconstructed for three regions of North America: Alaska and the Yukon (ALAYUK), the Mackenzie valley (MACKVA), and Quebec and Labrador (QUEBLA). The reconstructions primarily express temperature variability on interannual-to-decadal timescales and extend over the period from AD 1760. These reconstructions represent an extension of the mean climate history for these regions of over 100 years. The ALAYUK series shows relatively wann summers dominating the 1770s and 1820s. The 1760s, 1810s, 1860s, and 1890s were cold; 1810 was the coldest summer over...
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Understanding the climate and location aspects are usually the first step in energy applications – from buildings to renewable energy. With so many of the renewable energy sources being significantly dependent on weather, it is essential that the temporal and geospatial variability and distribution of climatic design parameters are investigated for effective planning and operation. ASHRAE-HOF is the most widely used climatic design conditions database for building energy and HVAC professionals, but gaps exist in the literature on the geospatial and temporal distributions of the HOF dataset. This research explored geospatial distributions of key HOF (2009) climatic parameters: temperature (dry-bulb, wet-bulb, dew-point...
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Slowly varying (trend) and abrupt (change points) changes in annual maximum daily precipitation (AMP) and seasonal maximum daily precipitation (SMP) across Canada for 223 stations in six regions during four periods (1900–2010, 1930–2010, 1950–2010 and 1970–2010) were analyzed. Variants of the Mann-Kendall (MK) test considering influences of short-term persistence (STP), long-term persistence (LTP) and large-scale climate anomalies on trend detection were applied to detect trends, and the Pettitt test was used to evaluate change points. The results indicate that there was a mix of increasing and decreasing trends for Canadian AMPs and SMPs. Most regions in Pacific Maritime, central Boreal regions and the Atlantic...
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This thesis examines historical climate variability and its effects on slope stability in northern British Columbia. It comprises three parts: (1) an analysis of climate trends and variability from the instrumental climate record; (2) an examination of climate controls on historic, large landslides; and (3) a demonstration of the utility of weather satellite imagery in determining landslide triggers. The climate of northern British Columbia has become wetter and warmer since the beginning of instrumental observations. Documented trends are complex due to ocean-atmosphere oscillations such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the El Niño Southern Oscillation. Long periods of increasing precipitation and temperature...
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We estimate future area burned in the Alaskan and Canadian forest by the mid-century (2046-2065) based on the simulated meteorology from 13 climate models under the A1B scenario. We develop ecoregion-dependent regressions using observed relationships between annual total area burned and a suite of meteorological variables and fire weather indices, and apply these regressions to the simulated meteorology. We find that for Alaska and western Canada, almost all models predict significant (p < 0.05) increases in area burned at the mid-century, with median values ranging from 150 to 390%, depending on the ecoregion. Such changes are attributed to the higher surface air temperatures and 500 hPa geopotential heights relative...


map background search result map search result map Climate Data Analysis of Existing Weather Stations in around the Central Alaska Network: Including Denali National Park and Preserve, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve.  Historical climate variability from the instrumental record in northern British Columbia and its influence on slope stability Water balance dynamics of three small catchments in a sub-arctic boreal forest Climate and snowpack monitoring progress report 2011: Arctic Network The Alaskan Arctic Frontal Zone: Forcing by Orography, Coastal Contrast, and the Boreal Forest Effects of persistence and large-scale climate anomalies on trends and change points in extreme precipitation of Canada Searching for Added Value in Simulating Climate Extremes with a High-Resolution Regional Climate Model over Western Canada Impact of 2050 climate change on North American wildfire: consequences for ozone air quality The Influence of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation on Annual Floods in the Rivers of Western Canada Water balance dynamics of three small catchments in a sub-arctic boreal forest Climate and snowpack monitoring progress report 2011: Arctic Network Climate Data Analysis of Existing Weather Stations in around the Central Alaska Network: Including Denali National Park and Preserve, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, and Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve.  The Alaskan Arctic Frontal Zone: Forcing by Orography, Coastal Contrast, and the Boreal Forest Historical climate variability from the instrumental record in northern British Columbia and its influence on slope stability The Influence of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation on Annual Floods in the Rivers of Western Canada Effects of persistence and large-scale climate anomalies on trends and change points in extreme precipitation of Canada Searching for Added Value in Simulating Climate Extremes with a High-Resolution Regional Climate Model over Western Canada Impact of 2050 climate change on North American wildfire: consequences for ozone air quality