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Change in the majority generalized vegetation type for each HUC5 watershed between historical (1971-2000) and future (2071-2100) time periods. The MC1 dynamic vegetation model was run under the CSIRO, MIROC, and Hadley climate change projections and the A2 anthropogenic emissions scenario.Majority generalized vegetation type was determined for each HUC5 watershed from from original ~ 4 km raster data. Generalized vegetation types were assigned by combining detailed MC1 vegetation classes into four general catagories: desert, grassland, shrubland, and forest. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background:...
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This dataset represents the average amount of Growing Degree Days (GDD) per year within each HUC5 watershed. Growing degree days (referenced to 0oC) (unit = deg C days) were determined for each HUC5 watershed. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries. They were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget, and wild fire impacts for OR, WA, AZ and NM, for a project funded by the USDA Forest Service (PNW 09-JV-11261900-003). The MC1 model was run using historical data and future climate change...
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For his MS thesis, Brendan Rogers used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain. The model was run assuming that nitrogen demand from the plants was always met so that the nitrogen concentrations in various plant parts never dropped below their minimum reported values. A CO2 enhancement effect increased productivity and water use efficiency as the atmospheric CO2 concentration increased.
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Percent change in the average C3 grass fraction (a biogeographic index based on the ratio of C3 to C4 grass) for each HUC5 watershed between historical (1971-2000) and future (2071-2100) time periods. The MC1 dynamic vegetation model was run under the CSIRO, MIROC, and Hadley climate change projections and the A2 anthropogenic emissions scenario. Simulated mean C3 grass fraction was determined for each HUC5 watershed. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen...
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The purpose of this project is to use existing climate change datasets from the Climate Impacts Group (CIG) to summarize the the projected climate change impacts to United States Forest Service (USFS) lands in Oregon and Washington (Figure 1). Stakeholders in the Forest Service of this region were particularly interested in the variables that are likely to impact freshwater aquatic species, including projected changes in water availability, snowpack, and flood and low flow severities. Our objective is to summarize climate and hydrologic projections for USFS lands in Oregon and Washington. Since individual national forests may contain numerous distinct ecological regimes and cross hydrologic boundaries, averaging...
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The Climate Commons Data Catalog provides searchable records describing data hosted on the Commons and elsewhere. Links on each catalog record lead you to the data if it is hosted online, and to related documents and websites.
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The Southwest Regional Gap Analysis Project (SWReGAP) is an update of the Gap Analysis Program’s mapping and assessment of biodiversity for the five-state region encompassing Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. It is a multi-institutional cooperative effort coordinated by the U.S. Geological Survey Gap Analysis Program. The primary objective of the update is to use a coordinated mapping approach to create detailed, seamless GIS maps of land cover, all native terrestrial vertebrate species, land stewardship, and management status, and to analyze this information to identify those biotic elements that are underrepresented on lands managed for their long term conservation or are “gaps.”
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Percent change in the average surface runoff for each HUC5 watershed between historical (1971-2000) and future (2071-2100) time periods. The MC1 dynamic vegetation model was run under the CSIRO, MIROC, and Hadley climate change projections and the A2 anthropogenic emissions scenario.Simulated mean annual surface runoff (in mm H2O yr-1), was determined for each HUC5 watershed by averaging values of original ~ 4 km raster data. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen...
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This dataset represents the average annual precipitation for each HUC5 watershed, simulated by the model MC1 for the 30-year period 1971-2000. Mean annual precipitation (in mm H2O yr-1), was determined for each HUC5 watershed by averaging values of original ~ 4 km raster data. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al.2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget, and wild fire impacts for OR, WA, AZ and NM, for a project funded by the USDA Forest Service (PNW09-JV-11261900-003). The MC1...
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Percent change in the average C3 grass fraction (a biogeographic index based on the ratio of C3 to C4 grass) for each HUC5 watershed between historical (1971-2000) and future (2071-2100) time periods. The MC1 dynamic vegetation model was run under the CSIRO, MIROC, and Hadley climate change projections and the A2 anthropogenic emissions scenario.Simulated mean C3 grass fraction was determined for each HUC5 watershed. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle,...
This project designed a monitoring program and protocol to detect the effects of climate change on tidal marsh bird population abundance and distribution. It is a companion to “Tidal Marsh Bird Population and Habitat Assessment for San Francisco Bay under Future Climate Change Conditions” and will build on its products, enabling evaluation of the long-term viability of four tidal-marsh bird species threatened by impacts of climate change: Clapper Rail, Black Rail, Common Yellowthroat, and Song Sparrow (three endemic subspecies: San Pablo, Suisun, and Alameda). Information is available through the California Avian Data Center. See also: http://data.prbo.org/apps/sfbslr/index.php?page=lcc-page
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This dataset represents the average amount of live tree carbon for each HUC5 watershed, simulated by the model MC1 for the 30-year period 1971-2000. Simulated mean live forest carbon (output variable C_Forestyr in MC1 version B60, which includes both above and below-ground tree carbon) was determined for each HUC5 watershed. Units are grams per square meter. Watersheds represent 5th level (HUC5, 10-digit) hydrologic unit boundaries and were acquired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Background: The dynamic global vegetation model MC1 (see Bachelet et al. 2001) was used to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget, and wild fire impacts for OR, WA, AZ and...
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This product is one of a set of mapped model simulation results generated for a project called "Global Climate Change and California: Potential Implications for Ecosystems, Health, and the Economy". The project was conducted by the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) and funded by the California Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program. The project was the most detailed study ever undertaken on the potential effect of climate change on California. The work examined a broad array of potentially affected sectors as well as the interactions between climate change and increased population, economic growth, and technological change. It considered a wide range of climate change scenarios,...
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This map shows the predicted area of high fire potential for the current year up to the end of the forecast period as simulated by a modified version of the MC1 Dynamic General Vegetation Model (DGVM). Different colors indicate the level of consensus among five different MC1 simulations (i.e., one for each forecast provided by five different weather models), ranging from one of five to five of five simulations predicting high fire potential. The area of high fire potential is where PDSI and MC1-calculated values of potential fire behavior (fireline intensity for forest and shrubland and rate of spread of spread for grassland) exceed calibrated threshold values. Potential fire behavior in MC1 is estimated using...
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This map shows the predicted area of high fire potential for the current year up to the end of the forecast period as simulated by a modified version of the MC1 Dynamic General Vegetation Model (DGVM). Different colors indicate the level of consensus among five different MC1 simulations (i.e., one for each forecast provided by five different weather models), ranging from one of five to five of five simulations predicting high fire potential. The area of high fire potential is where PDSI and MC1-calculated values of potential fire behavior (fireline intensity for forest and shrubland and rate of spread of spread for grassland) exceed calibrated threshold values. Potential fire behavior in MC1 is estimated using...
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wildfire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain....
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Soil residual water corresponds to the model variable "total streamflow"." In the model MC1, this is calculated (in cm of water) as the water flowing through the soil profile below the last soil layer (streamflow), water leached into the subsoil (baseflow) and also includes runoff. The output is presented here as a monthly average. Soil residual water is part of the model output from Brendan Rogers' MS thesis work. Brendan used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial...
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This collection of layers includes summary statistics from input and output data used for simulation of vegetation response to climate change in California. The historical data layers represent the 30 year period from 1961 to 1990. Future data layers represent each four 20 year periods: 2010-2029, 2030-2049, 2060-2079, and 2080-2099. The simulations were performed using MC1 dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM), source code revision 152. The model was parameterized and evaluated by the DGVM research group at the US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station, with support from the Western Wildland Environmental Threat Assessment Center. The model was parameterized to maximize concordance with maps of potential...
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This collection of layers includes summary statistics from input and output data used for simulation of vegetation response to climate change in California. The historical data layers represent the 30 year period from 1961 to 1990. Future data layers represent each four 20 year periods: 2010-2029, 2030-2049, 2060-2079, and 2080-2099. The simulations were performed using MC1 dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM), source code revision 152. The model was parameterized and evaluated by the DGVM research group at the US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station, with support from the Western Wildland Environmental Threat Assessment Center. The model was parameterized to maximize concordance with maps of potential...


map background search result map search result map Climate Change Projections for USFS Lands in Oregon and Washington Simulated historical runoff in millimeters (1971-2000 average) for the Pacific Northwest, USA Simulated percent change in C3 grass fraction between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for OR and WA, USA Forecast Vegetation Type Under PCM A2 Scenario Forecast C Consumed by Fire Under PCM A2 Scenario Simulated change in generalized vegetation types between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for AZ and NM, USA Simulated percent change in surface runoff between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for OR and WA, USA Simulated historical annual precipitation (1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA Historical Growing Degree Days (average 1971-2000) for AZ and NM, USA Simulated percent change in C3 grass fraction between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for OR and WA, USA Simulated historical live forest carbon (1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA GFDL A2 future climate scenario: annual output of potential natural vegetation for California MC1 DGVM fire potential consensus forecast July-December 2011 (number of weather forecasts resulting in high potential) MC1 DGVM fire potential consensus forecast May-November 2011 (number of weather forecasts resulting in high potential) Total soil residual water simulated in cm for November for the Pacific Northwest, USA (1971-2000 average) Total soil residual water simulated under Hadley CM3 A2 in cm for June for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Southwest Regional Gap Analysis Project California Landscape Conservation Cooperative (CA LCC) Climate Commons Dataset Catalog USGS 1:24000-scale Quadrangle for Model, CO 1971 Simulated historical runoff in millimeters (1971-2000 average) for the Pacific Northwest, USA Total soil residual water simulated in cm for November for the Pacific Northwest, USA (1971-2000 average) Total soil residual water simulated under Hadley CM3 A2 in cm for June for the Pacific Northwest, USA (2070-2099 average) Climate Change Projections for USFS Lands in Oregon and Washington California Landscape Conservation Cooperative (CA LCC) Climate Commons Dataset Catalog Forecast Vegetation Type Under PCM A2 Scenario Forecast C Consumed by Fire Under PCM A2 Scenario Simulated change in generalized vegetation types between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for AZ and NM, USA Historical Growing Degree Days (average 1971-2000) for AZ and NM, USA Simulated percent change in C3 grass fraction between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for OR and WA, USA Simulated percent change in surface runoff between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for OR and WA, USA Simulated historical annual precipitation (1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA Simulated percent change in C3 grass fraction between historical and future time periods under three climate change projections for OR and WA, USA Simulated historical live forest carbon (1971-2000) for OR and WA, USA Southwest Regional Gap Analysis Project GFDL A2 future climate scenario: annual output of potential natural vegetation for California MC1 DGVM fire potential consensus forecast July-December 2011 (number of weather forecasts resulting in high potential) MC1 DGVM fire potential consensus forecast May-November 2011 (number of weather forecasts resulting in high potential)