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These data were compiled for evaluating plant water use, or river-reach level evapotranspiration (ET) data, in the riparian corridor of the Colorado River delta as specified under Minute 319 of the 1944 Water Treaty. Additionally, these data were compiled for evaluating restoration-level data in Reach 2 and Reach 4, as specified under Minute 323 of the 1944 Water Treaty. Objectives of our study were to measure the peak growing season evapotranspiration (ET) for the average of months in summer-fall (May to October) for the seven reaches, for the full riparian corridor, and for four restoration sites, from 2013 through 2022. The seven reach areas from the Northerly International Boundary (NIB) to the end of the delta...
Tags: 1944 Water Treaty, Arizona, Botany, Colorado River, Colorado River delta, All tags...
The unique hydrologic conditions characterizing riparian ecosystems in dryland (arid and semi-arid) areas help maintain high biodiversity and support high levels of primary productivity compared to associated uplands. In western North America, many riparian ecosystems have been damaged by altered flow regimes (e.g., impoundments and diversions) and over utilization of water resources (e.g., groundwater pumping for agriculture and human consumption). This has led some state and national governments to provide occasional environmental flows to address the declining condition of such riparian systems. In a historic agreement between the United States and Mexico, 130 million cubic meters (mcm) of water was released...
Minute 319, a binational agreement between the United States and México, authorized environmental flows into the Colorado River Delta, including a high-profile pulse flow delivered in March through May 2014. Reforming water management policy to secure future delivery of environmental flows to the delta hinges on demonstrating the feasibility of delivering environmental water and documenting positive ecological responses of the delta's severely degraded riparian habitat. The design of the flow's hydrograph, the novel utilization of irrigation infrastructure, the preparation and subsequent maintenance of selected restoration sites, and interdisciplinary monitoring at multiple scales combined to show that ecological...
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These data were compiled for evaluating plant water use, or river-reach level evapotranspiration (ET) data, in the unrestored riparian corridor of the Colorado River delta as specified under Minute 319 of the 1944 Water Treaty. Additionally, these data were compiled for evaluating restoration-level data in Reach 2 and Reach 4, as specified under Minute 323 of the 1944 Water Treaty. Objectives of our study were to measure the peak growing season evapotranspiration (ET) for the average of months in summer-fall (May to October) for the seven reaches, for the full riparian corridor, and for four restoration sites, from 2019 through 2022. The seven reach areas from the Northerly International Boundary (NIB) to the end...
Tags: 1944 Water Treaty, Arizona, Botany, Colorado River, Colorado River delta, All tags...
Dam construction and water diversions along the Colorado River during the twentieth century have altered the downstream estuarine ecosystem. Although it is clear that the ecosystem has changed, a lack of pre-impact studies has made it challenging to determine the magnitude and direction of change. By using a paleontological approach, we can retrospectively estimate ecological conditions in the estuary from before dam construction, particularly for benthic organisms with preservable hard parts, such as the shells of bivalve mollusks. Here, for the first time, we quantify differences in evenness, richness, taxonomic similarity, and rank-order abundance between the bivalve community living in the estuary today and...
In the southwestern U.S., many riparian ecosystems have been altered by dams, water diversions, and other anthropogenic activities. This is particularly true of the Colorado River, where numerous dams and agricultural diversions have affected this water course, especially south of the U.S.–Mexico border. In the spring of 2014, 130 million cubic meters of water was released to the lower Colorado River Delta in Mexico. To understand the impact of this pulse flow release on vegetation in the delta's riparian corridor, we analyzed a modified form of Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI*) data. We assessed greenup during the growing period and estimated actual evapotranspiration...
As provided in Minute 319 of the U.S.-Mexico Water Treaty of 1944, a pulse flow of approximately 132 million cubic meters (mcm) was released to the riparian corridor of the Colorado River Delta over an eight-week period that began March 23, 2014 and ended May 18, 2014. Peak flows were released in the early part of the pulse to simulate a spring flood , with approximately 101.7 mcm released at Morelos Dam on the U.S.-Mexico border. The remainder of the pulse flow water was released to the riparian corridor via Mexicali Valley irrigation spillway canals, with 20.9 mcm released at Km 27 Spillway (41 km below Morelos Dam) and 9.3 mcm released at Km 18 Spillway (78 km below Morelos Dam). We used sequential satellite...
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In February 2014, taking action to implement a 2012 U.S.-Mexico agreement on the Colorado River known as Minute 319, International Boundary and Water Commissioners (IBWC) Edward Drusina and Roberto Fernando Salmon Castelo announced plans to move forward with a one-time pulse flow (a release of water into the Colorado River channel below the last dam on the River) as well as a five-year commitment by a coalition of Non-Governmental Organizations to deliver base flow water. Minute 319’s environmental water deliveries to the Colorado River Delta are intended to restore native riparian habitat along the river corridor, where invasive non-native saltcedar has displaced the native willow and cottonwood trees that provide...
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In February 2014, taking action to implement a 2012 U.S.-Mexico agreement on the Colorado River known as Minute 319, International Boundary and Water Commissioners (IBWC) Edward Drusina and Roberto Fernando Salmon Castelo announced plans to move forward with a one-time pulse flow (a release of water into the Colorado River channel below the last dam on the River) as well as a five-year commitment by a coalition of Non-Governmental Organizations to deliver base flow water. Minute 319’s environmental water deliveries to the Colorado River Delta are intended to restore native riparian habitat along the river corridor, where invasive non-native saltcedar has displaced the native willow and cottonwood trees that provide...


    map background search result map search result map Pre-pulse lidar Water Delivery Data and Model Integration for Restoring Ecological Health to the Colorado River Delta Results and Reports: Water Delivery Data and Model Integration for Restoring Ecological Health to the Colorado River Delta Remotely-sensed observations of the unrestored riparian corridor of the Colorado River Delta in Mexico, 2019-2022 Remotely-sensed observations of restoration sites of the riparian corridor of the Colorado River Delta in Mexico, 2013-2022 Remotely-sensed observations of the unrestored riparian corridor of the Colorado River Delta in Mexico, 2019-2022 Remotely-sensed observations of restoration sites of the riparian corridor of the Colorado River Delta in Mexico, 2013-2022 Pre-pulse lidar Water Delivery Data and Model Integration for Restoring Ecological Health to the Colorado River Delta Results and Reports: Water Delivery Data and Model Integration for Restoring Ecological Health to the Colorado River Delta