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This project gallery includes all project reports and associated assessment materials, including interactive and downloadable connectivity and climate datasets for the project " Creating Practitioner-driven, Science-based Plans for Connectivity Conservation in a Changing Climate: A Collaborative Assessment of Climate-Connectivity Needs in the Washington-British Columbia Transboundary Region".
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This GIS dataset is part of a suite of wildlife habitat connectivity data produced by the Washington Wildlife Habitat Connectivity Working Group (WHCWG). The WHCWG is a voluntary public-private partnership between state and federal agencies, universities, tribes, and non-governmental organizations. The WHCWG is co-led by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and the Washington Department of Transportation (WSDOT). The statewide analysis quantifies current connectivity patterns for Washington State and adjacent areas in British Columbia, Idaho, Oregon and a small portion of Montana. Available WHCWG raster data include model base layers, resistance, cost-weighted distance, landscape integrity networks,...
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PCIC offers statisically downscaled daily climate scenarios, at a gridded resolution of 300 arc-seconds (0.0833 degrees, or roughly 10 km) for the simulated period of 1950-2100. The variables available include minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation. These downscaling outputs are based on Global Climate Model (GCM) projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and historical daily gridded climate data for Canada.​​ Statistical properties and spatial patterns of the downscaled scenarios are based on this gridded observational dataset, which represents one approximation of the actual historical climate. Gridded values may differ from climate stations and biases may...
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These two datasets represent a normalized least-cost corridor mosaic (see WHCWG 2010 and McRae and Kavanagh 2011) calculated using (1) temperature gradients and a landscape integrity resistance raster, or (2) temperature gradients only, following the climate gradient linkage-modeling methods outlined in Nuñez (2011), using an adapted version of the Linkage Mapper software (McRae and Kavanagh 2011). This GIS dataset is one of several climate connectivity analyses produced by Tristan Nuñez for a Master's thesis (Nuñez 2011). The dataset was produced in part to assist the Climate Change Subgroup of the Washington Wildlife Habitat Connectivity Working Group (WHCWG). The core areas in the map lie in Washington State...
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Cold-induced mortality is a key factor driving mountain pine beetle( Dendroctonus ponderosae) population dynamics. In this species, the supercooling point (SCP) is representative of mortality induced by acute cold exposure. Mountain pine beetle SCP and associated cold-induced mortality fluctuate throughout a generation, with the highest SCPs prior to and following winter. Using observed SCPs of field-collected D. ponderosae larvae throughout the developmental season and associated phloem temperatures, we developed a mechanistic model that describes the SCP distribution of a population as a function of daily changes in the temperature-dependent processes leading to gain and loss of cold tolerance. It is based on...
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Projected current and future distributions of two tree species, Pinus albicaulis (Whitebark pine), Artemisia tridentata (Big Sagebrush), based on empirical bioclimatic models. Many recent changes in tree mortality, tree species distributions, and tree growth rates have been linked to changes in climate. Given that future climatic changes will likely surpass those experienced in the recent past, trees will likely face additional challenges as temperatures continue to rise and precipitation regimes shift. Managing forests in the face of climate change will require a basic understanding of which tree species will be most vulnerable to climate change and in what ways they will be vulnerable. We assessed the relative...
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This raster combines linkages developed from four landscape integrity-derived resistance surfaces: linear, low sensitivity, medium sensitivity, and high sensitivity. See Section 2.5.2 WHCWG (2012) for additional information pertaining to development of the four landscape integrity-derived resistance rasters. Adjacent core areas within 100 km Euclidean distance of one another were connected. This GIS dataset is part of a suite of wildlife habitat connectivity data produced by the Washington Wildlife Habitat Connectivity Working Group (WHCWG). The WHCWG is a voluntary public-private partnership between state and federal agencies, universities, tribes, and non-governmental organizations. The WHCWG is co-led by the...
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This raster was clipped from the raw NLCC raster for this species according to the linkage width cutoff listed in Table 2.2 WHCWG (2012). As with the statewide analysis (see WHCWG 2010), the normalized least-cost corridor algorithms produced wall-to-wall linkage maps, with everygrid cell in the study area having a value that represented its deviation from the nearest least-cost movement route. This necessitated creating maps that displayed only values from zero (the optimum modeled route) to a species-specific linkage width cutoff to identify areas that contribute most to connectivity between each HCA pair. Because of the smaller extent of this analysis and the finer-scale data that were available, we chose cutoff...
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Projected current and future potential distribution for the following vertebrate species: American Black Bear (Ursus americanus), American Marten (Martes americana), Canadian Lynx (Lynx canadensis), Lewis's Woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus), Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), Wolverine (Gulo gulo), based on correlative bioclimatic models and projected changes in vegetation biomes. Bioclimatic models were built using the Random Forest algorithm. Projected changes in vegetation were also modeled using the Random Forest algorithm but were produced by Rehfeldt et al. (2012). Projected current distribution is based on the average climate conditions for the years 1961-1990. Projected future...
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The Energy Release Component (ERC) is a calculated output of the National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS). The ERC is a number related to the available energy (BTU) per unit area (square foot) within the flaming front at the head of a fire. The ERC is considered a composite fuel moisture index as it reflects the contribution of all live and dead fuels to potential fire intensity. As live fuels cure and dead fuels dry, the ERC will increase and can be described as a build-up index. The ERC has memory. Each daily calculation considers the past 7 days in calculating the new number. Daily variations of the ERC are relatively small as wind is not part of the calculation. The ERC is projected to the 2050s using three...
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Projected change from historical (1950-2005) in several hydrometerological variables under three Global Circulation Models for two time periods (2050s and 2080s) under RCP 8.5. This metadata record documents multiple individual datasets, specifically the change from historical (1950-2005) for 12 hydrometerological variables projected by 3 Global Circulation Models (GCM) over 2 future time periods, for one Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP 8.5) The variables are: Water Deficit, Spring (March-May) Water Deficit, Summer (July-September) Potential Evapotranspiration, Spring (March-May) Potential Evapotranspiration, Summer (July-September) Total Runoff, Summer (June-August) Total Runoff, Spring (March-May)...
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Future climate change may significantly alter the distributions of many plant taxa. The effects of climate change may be particularly large in mountainous regions where climate can vary significantly with elevation. Understanding potential future vegetation changes in these regions requires methods that can resolve vegetation responses to climate change at fine spatial resolutions. This research was projected using three models: cgcm31, hadley, and current. We used LPJ, a dynamic global vegetation model, to assess potential future vegetation changes for a large topographically complex area of the northwest United States and southwest Canada (38.0–58.0°N latitude by 136.6–103.0°W longitude). LPJ is a process-based...


    map background search result map search result map Normalized least-cost corridors, statewide analysis for six vertebrae species in the Pacific Northwest Projected habitat suitability for several vertebrate species in the Pacific Northwest based on projected climatic suitability, projected vegetation, and current land use Normalized least cost corridors, Columbia Plateau analysis for two species in the Pacific Northwest Modeling cold tolerance in the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) Projected current and future distributions for Big Sagebrush and Whitebark Pine tree species the Pacific Northwest Landscape integrity HCA and corridors from four integrity-derived resistance surfaces Statistically down-scaled climate scenarios for the simulated period of 1950-2100 for the Northwest US and British Columbia, Canada Integrated scenarios of the future Northwest U.S. environment: hydrometerological projections for 2050s and 2080s, CMIP5 models, RCP 8.5 Normalized least-corridor mosaic using temperature gradients and landscape integrity resistance Change from Historical in Number of Days with High Fire Risk (Energy Release Component > 95th percentile), RCP8.5, 2050s Projected future vegetation changes for the Northwest United States and Southwest Canada at a fine spatial resolution using a dynamic global vegetation model Normalized least cost corridors, Columbia Plateau analysis for two species in the Pacific Northwest Landscape integrity HCA and corridors from four integrity-derived resistance surfaces Change from Historical in Number of Days with High Fire Risk (Energy Release Component > 95th percentile), RCP8.5, 2050s Modeling cold tolerance in the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) Normalized least-cost corridors, statewide analysis for six vertebrae species in the Pacific Northwest Normalized least-corridor mosaic using temperature gradients and landscape integrity resistance Integrated scenarios of the future Northwest U.S. environment: hydrometerological projections for 2050s and 2080s, CMIP5 models, RCP 8.5 Projected current and future distributions for Big Sagebrush and Whitebark Pine tree species the Pacific Northwest Projected future vegetation changes for the Northwest United States and Southwest Canada at a fine spatial resolution using a dynamic global vegetation model Projected habitat suitability for several vertebrate species in the Pacific Northwest based on projected climatic suitability, projected vegetation, and current land use Statistically down-scaled climate scenarios for the simulated period of 1950-2100 for the Northwest US and British Columbia, Canada