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Information about geographic distributions is required for species conservation and management. Ultimately, this information is derived from records of occurrence. However, the reliability and availability of occurrence records are variable. A conceptual framework for evaluating the reliability of occurrence records is provided. Only records associated with physical evidence, especially a museum voucher specimen, are considered verified. However, errors in species identification or location are possible even for verified records. In addition, biases exist in occurrence records because they generally are collected haphazardly. Other sources of bias include sampling error associated with small areas or range limits...
This cooperative effort by USDA Forest Service Research and the National Forest System assesses the state of knowledge related to the conservation status of four forest carnivores in the western United States: American marten, fisher, lynx, and wolverine. The conservation assessment reviews the biology and ecology of these species. It also discusses management considerations stemming from what is known and identifies information needed. Overall, we found huge knowledge gaps that make it difficult to evaluate the species' conservation status. In the western United States, the forest carnivores in this assessment are limited to boreal forest ecosystems. These forests are characterized by extensive landscapes with...
We modeled populations of lynx (Lynx canadensis) and snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) to determine prey densities required for persistence of lynx translocated to the southern portion of the species' range. The models suggested that a density of 1.1?1.8 hares/h is required for lynx persistence; these densities are higher than those reported for most hare populations across the USA. We found that lynx dispersal and density-independent mortality substantially increased the hare density required for lynx persistence. Reintroduction success was associated with number of release events, total number of animals released, and timing of release relative to the phase of the hare population cycle. However, no release protocol...
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The role of lynx dispersal in maintaining their populations at the landscape scale is unclear. A large proportion of local lynx populations are known to disperse following a snowshoe hare population crash, but whether these dispersal events contribute to the cyclic dynamics of neighboring populations is not well understood. If lynx dispersal does play an important role in lynx population dynamics then the conservation of dispersal corridors is critical to maintaining those dynamics. However, we currently have no information on the habitat requirements of dispersing lynx in relation to human land use, such as housing developments, road building, timber harvest, and mining, all of which could have a substantial impact...
Dartmouth College Woodlands Wildlife Monitoring Project is a project within the AMMonitor community, which features projects that monitor wildlife and ecosystems with remotely deployed monitoring devices. Devices that capture media typically include trail cameras (photos, video) and/or autonomous recording units (audio). As with all AMMonitor projects, Dartmouth College Woodlands Wildlife Monitoring Project utilizes an AMMonitor SQLite database to track wildlife monitoring data in a standardized format, permitting cross-project collaboration. The monitoring data are released to the public in "volumes". Releases include the raw media files and their metadata, including the date, time, and location of media capture....
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This volume's release consists of 46576 media files captured by autonomous wildlife monitoring devices under the project, Dartmouth College Woodlands Wildlife Monitoring Project. The attached files listed below include several CSV files that provide information about the data release. The file, "media.csv" provides the metadata about the media, such as filename and date/time of capture. The actual media files are housed within folders under the volume's "child items" as compressed files. A critical CSV file is "dictionary.csv", which describes each CSV file, including field names, data types, descriptions, and the relationship of each field to fields in other CSV files. Some of the media files may have been "tagged"...
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This volume's release consists of 90364 media files captured by autonomous wildlife monitoring devices under the project, Silvio O Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge Wildlife Monitoring Project. The attached files listed below include several CSV files that provide information about the data release. The file, "media.csv" provides the metadata about the media, such as filename and date/time of capture. The actual media files are housed within folders under the volume's "child items" as compressed files. A critical CSV file is "dictionary.csv", which describes each CSV file, including field names, data types, descriptions, and the relationship of each field to fields in other CSV files. Some of the media files...
Categories: Data; Tags: Alces americanus americanus, Bonasa umbellus, Buteo jamaicensis, Canachites canadensis, Canis latrans, All tags...


    map background search result map search result map Movement Patterns, Dispersal Behavior, and Survival of Lynx in Relation to Snowshoe Hare Abundance in the Boreal Forest Silvio O Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge Wildlife Monitoring Project (2014 - 2024) Dartmouth College Woodlands Wildlife Monitoring Project Volume 1 (2014 - 2024) Silvio O Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge Wildlife Monitoring Project (2014 - 2024) Movement Patterns, Dispersal Behavior, and Survival of Lynx in Relation to Snowshoe Hare Abundance in the Boreal Forest