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In coastal areas of the United States, where water and land interface in complex and dynamic ways, it is common to find concentrated residential and commercial development. These coastal areas often contain various landholdings managed by Federal, State, and local municipal authorities for public recreation and conservation. These areas are frequently subjected to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is compiling existing reliable historical shoreline data to calculate rates of shoreline change along the conterminous coast of the United States, and select coastlines of Alaska and Hawaii, as part of the Coastal Change Hazards priority...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/shoreline-change/), documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/shoreline-change/), documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal...
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During Hurricane Irma in September 2017, Florida and Georgia experienced significant impacts to beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs. Extensive erosion and coral losses result in increased immediate and long-term hazards to shorelines that include densely populated regions. These hazards put critical infrastructure at risk to future flooding and erosion and may cause economic losses. The USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards Resources Program (CMHRP) is assessing hurricane-induced coastal erosion along the southeast US coastline and implications for vulnerability to future storms. Shoreline positions were compiled prior to and following Hurricane Irma along the sandy shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic...
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During Hurricane Irma in September 2017, Florida and Georgia experienced significant impacts to beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs. Extensive erosion and coral losses result in increased immediate and long-term hazards to shorelines that include densely populated regions. These hazards put critical infrastructure at risk to future flooding and erosion and may cause economic losses. The USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards Resources Program (CMHRP) is assessing hurricane-induced coastal erosion along the southeast US coastline and implications for vulnerability to future storms. Shoreline positions were compiled prior to and following Hurricane Irma along the sandy shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic...
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During Hurricane Irma in September 2017, Florida and Georgia experienced significant impacts to beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs. Extensive erosion and coral losses result in increased immediate and long-term hazards to shorelines that include densely populated regions. These hazards put critical infrastructure at risk to future flooding and erosion and may cause economic losses. The USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards Resources Program (CMHRP) is assessing hurricane-induced coastal erosion along the southeast US coastline and implications for vulnerability to future storms. Shoreline positions were compiled prior to and following Hurricane Irma along the sandy shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic...
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During Hurricane Irma in September 2017, Florida and Georgia experienced significant impacts to beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs. Extensive erosion and coral losses result in increased immediate and long-term hazards to shorelines that include densely populated regions. These hazards put critical infrastructure at risk to future flooding and erosion and may cause economic losses. The USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards Resources Program (CMHRP) is assessing hurricane-induced coastal erosion along the southeast US coastline and implications for vulnerability to future storms. Shoreline positions were compiled prior to and following Hurricane Irma along the sandy shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
thumbnail
Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
thumbnail
Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/shoreline-change/), documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal...
thumbnail
Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/shoreline-change/), documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal...
thumbnail
During Hurricane Irma in September 2017, Florida and Georgia experienced significant impacts to beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs. Extensive erosion and coral losses result in increased immediate and long-term hazards to shorelines that include densely populated regions. These hazards put critical infrastructure at risk to future flooding and erosion and may cause economic losses. The USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards Resources Program (CMHRP) is assessing hurricane-induced coastal erosion along the southeast US coastline and implications for vulnerability to future storms. Shoreline positions were compiled prior to and following Hurricane Irma along the sandy shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic...
thumbnail
Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/shoreline-change/), documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal...
thumbnail
During Hurricane Irma in September 2017, Florida and Georgia experienced significant impacts to beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs. Extensive erosion and coral losses result in increased immediate and long-term hazards to shorelines that include densely populated regions. These hazards put critical infrastructure at risk to future flooding and erosion and may cause economic losses. The USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards Resources Program (CMHRP) is assessing hurricane-induced coastal erosion along the southeast US coastline and implications for vulnerability to future storms. Shoreline positions were compiled prior to and following Hurricane Irma along the sandy shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic...
thumbnail
In coastal areas of the United States, where water and land interface in complex and dynamic ways, it is common to find concentrated residential and commercial development. These coastal areas often contain various landholdings managed by Federal, State, and local municipal authorities for public recreation and conservation. These areas are frequently subjected to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is compiling existing reliable historical shoreline data to calculate rates of shoreline change along the conterminous coast of the United States, and select coastlines of Alaska and Hawaii, as part of the Coastal Change Hazards priority...
thumbnail
Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
thumbnail
Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/shoreline-change/), documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal...
thumbnail
In coastal areas of the United States, where water and land interface in complex and dynamic ways, it is common to find concentrated residential and commercial development. These coastal areas often contain various landholdings managed by Federal, State, and local municipal authorities for public recreation and conservation. These areas are frequently subjected to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is compiling existing reliable historical shoreline data to calculate rates of shoreline change along the conterminous coast of the United States, and select coastlines of Alaska and Hawaii, as part of the Coastal Change Hazards priority...
thumbnail
During Hurricane Irma in September 2017, Florida and Georgia experienced significant impacts to beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs. Extensive erosion and coral losses result in increased immediate and long-term hazards to shorelines that include densely populated regions. These hazards put critical infrastructure at risk to future flooding and erosion and may cause economic losses. The USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards Resources Program (CMHRP) is assessing hurricane-induced coastal erosion along the southeast US coastline and implications for vulnerability to future storms. Shoreline positions were compiled prior to and following Hurricane Irma along the sandy shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic...


map background search result map search result map Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Alabama Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Louisiana Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Mississippi Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Florida west (FLwest) Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Georgia (GA) Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for South Carolina (SC) Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for northeastern Florida (FLne) Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for southeastern Florida (FLse) Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for central North Carolina (NCcentral) Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for northern North Carolina (NCnorth) Long-term shoreline change rates for the Florida east coast (FLec) coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Short-term shoreline change rates for the Florida east coast (FLec) coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Long-term shoreline change rates for the Florida west coast (FLwc) coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Short-term shoreline change rates for the Florida west coast (FLwc) coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Long-term shoreline change rates for the Florida panhandle (FLph) coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Short-term shoreline change rates for the Georgia coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Long-term shoreline change rates for the Georgia coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Long-term shoreline change rates for the Central California coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Long-term shoreline change rates for the Northern California coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Long-term shoreline change rates for the Southern California coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for northern North Carolina (NCnorth) Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for central North Carolina (NCcentral) Short-term shoreline change rates for the Georgia coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Long-term shoreline change rates for the Georgia coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Georgia (GA) Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for southeastern Florida (FLse) Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Florida west (FLwest) Long-term shoreline change rates for the Florida west coast (FLwc) coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Short-term shoreline change rates for the Florida west coast (FLwc) coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for northeastern Florida (FLne) Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Louisiana Long-term shoreline change rates for the Florida panhandle (FLph) coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for South Carolina (SC) Long-term shoreline change rates for the Northern California coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Long-term shoreline change rates for the Southern California coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Short-term shoreline change rates for the Florida east coast (FLec) coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Long-term shoreline change rates for the Florida east coast (FLec) coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Long-term shoreline change rates for the Central California coastal region using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0