Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: Lahontan Basin (X)

3 results (39ms)   

Filters
Date Range
Extensions
Types
Contacts
Categories
Tag Types
Tag Schemes
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
Isotope and trace-metal analyses were used to determine the origin of plants used to manufacture prehistoric textiles (basketry and matting) from archaeological sites in the western Great Basin. Research focused on strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and oxygen (18O/16O) isotope ratios of willow (Salix sp.) and tule (Schoenoplectus sp.), the dominant raw materials in Great Basin textiles. The oxygen-isotope data indicated that the willow and tule used to produce the textiles were harvested from the banks of rivers or in marshes characterized by flowing water and not from lakes or sinks. The strontium-isotope data were useful in showing which plants came from the Humboldt River and which came from rivers headed in the Sierra Nevada.
FY2017Removal of livestock grazing is a common prescription to promote ecosystem recovery after wildfire (and subsequent emergency site rehabilitation efforts). Ecosystem recovery is typically considered from a terrestrial perspective, but wildfire and grazing can strongly influence aquatic ecosystems as well, especially smaller and fragmented stream networks, which are prevalent in the Great Basin (Minshall et al. 1989[1]; Dunham et al. 2003[2]; Luce et al. 2012[3]). Understanding these influences is essential for managing fire and grazing. Examples include identifying timeframes for resuming livestock grazing following wildfire, and the interactions between livestock grazing, fuels, and recovery of stream-side...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Data Acquisition and Development, Federal resource managers, Generalized Random Tesselation Stratified, Generalized Random Tesselation Stratified, Generalized Random Tesselation Stratified, All tags...
Isotope and trace-metal analyses were used to determine the origin of plants used to manufacture prehistoric textiles (basketry and matting) from archaeological sites in the western Great Basin. Research focused on strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and oxygen (18O/16O) isotope ratios of willow (Salix sp.) and tule (Schoenoplectus sp.), the dominant raw materials in Great Basin textiles. The oxygen-isotope data indicated that the willow and tule used to produce the textiles were harvested from the banks of rivers or in marshes characterized by flowing water and not from lakes or sinks. The strontium-isotope data were useful in showing which plants came from the Humboldt River and which came from rivers headed in the Sierra Nevada.


    map background search result map search result map Wildfire, grazing and availability of water in sage steppe ecosystems Wildfire, grazing and availability of water in sage steppe ecosystems