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In laboratory tests, young Chelydra serpentina and Trachemys scripta altered their distribution in the presence of a temperature gradient. Selection of temperatures in the gradient for hatchlings and yearlings showed that body temperatures (Tbs) of C. serpentina were lower than T. scripta, but the difference was insignificant. Relatively low Tbs could allow greater activity range and reduced metabolic maintenance cost for C. serpentina, which seldom leaves water.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Journal of Thermal Biology
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Studies using mounts have an inherently nested error structure; calibration and standardization should use the appropriate procedures and statistics. One example is that individual mount differences are nested within morphological factors related to species, age, or gender; without replication, mount differences may be confused with differences due to morphology. Also, the sensitivity of mounts to orientation to wind or sun is nested within mount; without replication, inadvertent variation in mount positioning may be confused with differences among mounts. Data on heat loss from a of 1-day-old mallard duckling mount are used to illustrate orientation sensitivity. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Journal of Thermal Biology
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1.We examined multiple hypotheses regarding differences in body temperatures of the Giant Gartersnake using temperature-sensitive radio telemetry and an information-theoretic analytical approach.2.Giant Gartersnakes selected body temperatures near 30 ??C, and males and females had similar body temperatures most of the year, except during the midsummer gestation period.3.Seasonal differences in the body temperatures of males and females may relate to both the costs associated with thermoregulatory behavior, such as predation, and the benefits associated with maintaining optimal body temperatures, such as successful incubation.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Journal of Thermal Biology
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The purpose of this study was to characterize thermal patterns and generate occupancy models for adult walleye from lakes Erie and Huron with internally implanted biologgers coupled with a telemetry study to assess the effects of sex, fish size, diel periods, and lake. Sex, size, and diel periods had no effect on thermal occupancy of adult walleye in either lake. Thermal occupancy differed between lakes and seasons. Walleye from Lake Erie generally experienced higher temperatures throughout the spring and summer months than did walleye in Lake Huron, due to limnological differences between the lakes. Tagged walleye that remained in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron (i.e., adjacent to the release location), as opposed to those...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Journal of Thermal Biology
1. 1. Badgers, marmots, white-tailed prairie dogs, black-tailed prairie dogs, Wyoming ground squirrels, thirteen-lined ground squirrels and laboratory rats were monitored for their urea hydrolyzing ability by gut bacterial urease during periods of food availability and food deprivation. 2. 2. There did not appear to be a correlation between an animal's ability to hibernate and to expire 14CO2 from hydrolyzed 14C-urea injected intraperitoneally. 3. 3. In addition, fasting and water deprivation (characteristic of hibernation hypothermic bouts) resulted in a decrease in urea hydrolysis by all species except for the rat. It is speculated that urea hydrolysis may be more directly related to gut bacterial biomass or pH...
1. Arrest temperatures and Q10 values for extensor digitorum longus (EDL), soleus, trabecula, and jejunum muscle twitch strength, contraction time, and 0.5 relaxation time were calculated for a deep torpor hibernator, white-tailed prairie dog (WTPD) (Cynomys leucurus), a shallow torpor hibernator, black-tailed prairie dog (BTPD) (Cynomys ludovicianus), and a non-hibernator, lab rat (Rattus norvegicus) to test the hypothesis that tissue temperature tolerances limit the depth of expressed torpor. 2. There were no temperature tolerance differences between the tissues of the two species of hibernators. Both hibernating species had arrest temperatures and Q10 values more indicative of cold temperature tolerance than...
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Understanding the relationships between environmental variables and wildlife activity is an important part of effective management. The desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), an imperiled species of arid environments in the southwest US, may have increasingly restricted windows for activity due to current warming trends. In summer 2013, we deployed 48 motion sensor cameras at the entrances of tortoise burrows to investigate the effects of temperature, sex, and day of the year on the activity of desert tortoises. Using generalized estimating equations, we found that the relative probability of activity was associated with temperature (linear and quadratic), sex, and day of the year. Sex effects showed that male tortoises...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Journal of Thermal Biology
1. 1.|The temperature preference of Bufo marinus in a linear thermal gradient over a 24 h period was measured in the spring using uniform light (UL) over the length of the gradient and in the spring and fall using a point source of light over the hot end of the gradient only (LH). 2. 2.|The temperature preference of Bufo cognatus in a linear thermal gradient was measured over a 24 h period during the fall with the LH regime. 3. 3.|Light regime and season had no effect on the mean body temperature (Tb) selected over a 24 h period in B. marinus. The pattern of temperature selection over time was influenced by season. 4. 4.|Temperate B. cognatus selected significantly higher mean Tbs that the tropical B. marinus and...
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The lack of a truly satisfactory sensor which can characterize the thermal environment at the spatial scale experienced by small endotherms has hindered study of their thermoregulatory behavior. We describe a general design for a rugged, easily constructed sensor to measure standard operative temperature, Tes. We present specific designs for adult dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis) and hatchling mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Sensor response was stable and repeatable (??1.4%) over the course of several months. Over the range of conditions for which validation data were available (variable air temperature and wind with negligible net radiation), sensors predicted the mean net heat production of live animals to within...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Journal of Thermal Biology
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(1) We designed a physical model that simulates the thermal and evaporative properties of live Western toads (Bufo boreas). (2) In controlled tests, the model tracked the body temperature of live toads with an average error of 0.3±0.03 °C (test range=4–30 °C). (3) It estimated the evaporative water loss of live toads with an average error of 0.35–0.65 g/h, or about 14% (test range=0.7–9 g/h). (4) Data collected with this physical model should provide an effective way for biologists to better understand habitat selection in toads and other amphibians.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Journal of Thermal Biology
1. 1. White-tailed prairie dogs are spontaneous hibernators while black-tailed prairie dogs do not hibernate unless severely deprived of food and water at low ambient temperatures. 2. 2. Contrary to what has been thought about spontaneous and facultative hibernators, both of these species in this study had similar body fat content when trapped in the field. Also, both species had an identical nonshivering thermogenic response when tested at mid-winter. 3. 3. White-tailed prairie dogs became spontaneously anorexic during late fall and underwent bouts of torpor while the black-tailed prairie dogs continued to eat throughout the winter and only rarely entered torpor. 4. 4. In spite of their different thermoregulatory...