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Pour points derived from NHDPlus V2.1 flow direction rasters and the NHDPlus V2.1 WBD HU12 snapshot. Three sets of pour points are provided: From (fpp) and to (tpp) points that identify the location where raster flow leaves the HU12 polygon, and a third "vector pour point" (vpp) selected "upstream" for use in detecting flow confluences near the raster pour point locations. This dataset is PROVISIONAL and SUBJECT TO REVISION.
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Landforms along the Pacific, Gulf of Mexico, and Atlantic coastlines for the conterminous United States are attributed with the relative vulnerability of horizontal erosion due to sea-level rise to characterize coastal zone stability. The position and extent of landforms are geospatially indexed as line-events where these coastal zone features are intersected by the linear-referenced 2013 - 2014 U.S. Geological Survey National Hydrography Dataset Coastline, which corresponds to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 2013 - 2014 mean high water level datum delineated in intertidal zones open to oceans, behind barrier coasts in bays, lagoons, and estuaries, and sometimes where tidal currents reach...
The National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD) are used to portray surface water on The National Map. The NHD represents the drainage network with features such as rivers, streams, canals, lakes, ponds, coastline, dams, and streamgages. An important use of the NHD is the analysis of surface-water systems. This analysis is possible because many types of location information can be linked to the NHD, such as flow-volume, velocity, temperature, water chemistry, pollution control classifications, aquatic species habitat, recreation designations, or water rights. Such network-linked data is typically maintained by various organizations at Federal, State, and local levels, as well as research,...
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A new and more complete version of this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5066/P9QQTKA0. This dataset contains information about waterfall location and characteristics. It also provides a linear reference to two National Hydrography Datasets. This dataset is based off the World Waterfall Database (WWD) and other source datasets. The coordinates and spatial attributes from the WWD were used to help verify locations in Google Earth. From there, the USGS HydroLink Tool was used to link data to both the NHDPlusV2.1 (1:100,000 scale) and NHD High Resolution Dataset (1:24,000 scale). This dataset currently includes waterfalls from the states of Indiana, Wisconsin, Michigan, Nebraska, Illinois and Missouri....
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Landforms along the Pacific, Gulf of Mexico, and Atlantic coastlines for the conterminous United States are attributed with the relative vulnerability of horizontal erosion due to sea-level rise to characterize coastal zone stability. The position and extent of landforms are geospatially indexed as line-events where these coastal zone features are intersected by the linear-referenced 2013 - 2014 U.S. Geological Survey National Hydrography Dataset Coastline, which corresponds to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 2013 - 2014 mean high water level datum delineated in intertidal zones open to oceans, behind barrier coasts in bays, lagoons, and estuaries, and sometimes where tidal currents reach...
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This polyline feature class depicts the classification of each wild and scenic river segment designated by Congress and the Secretary of the Interior for the United States and Puerto Rico. This layer was created by a multi-agency effort including the US Forest Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management and the Fish and Wildlife Service. The spatial data were referenced to the latest High Resolution National Hydrological Data Layer (NHD 1:24,000 Scale or better), published by United States Geological Survey (USGS).“Wild” rivers are free of dams, generally inaccessible except by trail, and represent vestiges of primitive America. “Scenic” rivers are free of dams, with shorelines or watersheds still...
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Coastal Mean High Water (MHW) is contoured in intertidal zones open to oceans, behind barrier coasts in bays, lagoons, and estuaries, and sometimes where tidal currents reach upstream (landward) of the embayed foreshore water bodies. In the National Geospatial Program (NGP) surface water hydrography maintained in the Nation Hydrography Dataset (NHD) Flowline Network projects Mean High Water level (MHW) as the linear-referenced 1:24,000-scale resolution NHD Coastline (http://nhd.usgs.gov/). NHDCoastline Geomorphology and associated Risk line-event feature classes that rank the relative risk of horizontal erosion on a scale of 1 to 5 (least to most risk, respectively) have been developed in a geographic information...


    map background search result map search result map Linear-referenced Geomorphology and Relative Vulnerability to Erosion at the 2013 – 2014 conterminous U.S. Pacific Ocean National Hydrography Dataset Coastline Waterfalls linked to the National Hydrography Datasets Linear-referenced Geomorphology and Relative Vulnerability to Erosion at the 2013 – 2014 conterminous U.S. Atlantic Ocean National Hydrography Dataset Coastline Wild and Scenic Rivers US_NHD_CoastalGeomorphology WBD HU12 Pour Points derived from NHDPlus NHD Point Events (Snapshot 8/25/2016) Linear-referenced Geomorphology and Relative Vulnerability to Erosion at the 2013 – 2014 conterminous U.S. Pacific Ocean National Hydrography Dataset Coastline Linear-referenced Geomorphology and Relative Vulnerability to Erosion at the 2013 – 2014 conterminous U.S. Atlantic Ocean National Hydrography Dataset Coastline US_NHD_CoastalGeomorphology WBD HU12 Pour Points derived from NHDPlus Wild and Scenic Rivers Waterfalls linked to the National Hydrography Datasets NHD Point Events (Snapshot 8/25/2016)