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As an oceanic archipelago isolated from continental source areas, Hawaii lacks native terrestrial reptiles and amphibians, Polynesians apparently introduced seven gecko and skink species after discovering the islands approximately 1500 years ago, and another 15 reptiles and five frogs have been introduced in the last century and a half (McKeown 1996). The Polynesian introductions are probably inadvertent because the species involved are known stowaway dispersers (Gibbons 1985; Dye and Steadman 1990), In contrast, most of the herpetological introductions since European contact with Hawaii have been intentional. Several frog species were released for biocontrol of insects (e.g., Dendrobates auratus, Bufo marinus,...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Herpetological Review
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USA: LOUISIANA: Vermilion Parish: Palmetto Island State Park (29.86335°N, 92.14848°W; WGS 84). 19 February 2016. Lindy J. Muse. Verified by Jeff Boundy. Florida Museum of Natural History (UF 177730, photo voucher). New parish record (Dundee and Rossman 1989. The Amphibians and Reptiles of Louisiana. Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 300 pp.). Storeria occipitomaculata obscura has not been documented in any of the coastal parishes of Louisiana (Boundy. 2006. Snakes of Louisiana. Louisiana Department of Wildlife & Fisheries, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 40 pp.). However, this species can be difficult to find in southern Louisiana and other populations in coastal parishes may eventually be discovered....
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Herpetological Review
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The natural range of Trachemys scripta elegans is centered in the south-central United States, from Illinois to the Gulf of Mexico. Because of its prominence in the international pet trade, the species now can be found over much of the United States, and its introduction has been documented throughout the world (Ernst et al. 1994. Turtles of the United States and Canada. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington. 578 pp.). There has been speculation as to whether and where introduced Red-eared Sliders can reproduce in the wild in California (Bury and Luckenbach 1976. Biol. Conserv. 10:1-14). Successful nesting or presumed breeding (i.e., gravid females) in northern California were reported by Bury and Luckenbach...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Herpetological Review
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Boa constrictor is often referred to as a sit-and-wait or ambush forager that chooses locations to maximize the likelihood of prey encounters (Greene 1983. In Janzen [ed.], Costa Rica Natural History, pp. 380-382. Univ. Chicago Press, Illinois). However, as more is learned about the natural history of snakes in general, the dichotomy between active versus ambush foraging is becoming blurred. Herein, we describe an instance of diurnal active foraging by a B. constrictor, illustrating that this species exhibits a range of foraging behaviors.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Herpetological Review
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Sahara Mustard (Brassica tournefortii) is a non-native, highly invasive weed species of southwestern U.S. deserts. Sahara Mustard is a hardy species, which flourishes under many conditions including drought and in both disturbed and undisturbed habitats (West and Nabhan 2002. In B. Tellman [ed.], Invasive Plants: Their Occurrence and Possible Impact on the Central Gulf Coast of Sonora and the Midriff Islands in the Sea of Cortes, pp. 91–111. University of Arizona Press, Tucson). Because of this species’ ability to thrive in these habitats, B. tournefortii has been able to propagate throughout the southwestern United States establishing itself in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts in Arizona, California, Nevada, and...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Herpetological Review
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No abstract available. Review info: Reptiles and amphibians of the Smokies. By Stephen C. Tilley, James E. Huheey, 2001. ISBN: 978-0937207307, 143 p.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Herpetological Review
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Aspidoscelis deppii is widely distributed from Veracruz and Michoacan, Mexico, to Costa Rica (Köhler et al. 2006. The Amphibians and Reptiles of El Salvador, Krieger Publishing Company, Malabar, Florida. 238 pp.). Neotropical lizards are abundant and common prey to all classes of terrestrial vertebrates, and bird predation of lizards is well known. The Turkey Vulture (Carthartes aura) is widely distributed from southern Canada south to South America and is present throughout the entire range of A. deppii, where it occupies a variety of open and forested habitats and feeds opportunistically on a wide range of wild and domestic carrion. While almost exclusively a scavenger, this species is known to rarely kill small...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Herpetological Review


map background search result map search result map Gopherus agassizii (Desert Tortoise). Non-native seed dispersal Gopherus agassizii (Desert Tortoise). Non-native seed dispersal