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Broom snakeweed (snakeweed) is an aggressive native range-weed found throughout arid and semiarid areas of the western United States, that increases following disturbances such as overgrazing, drought, or wildfire. Ecologically based strategies that include controlling snakeweed and reestablishing desirable herbaceous species are needed to restore productivity and diversity to invaded areas. The objective of this study was to compare the ability of selected introduced and native grass species and prostrate kochia (kochia) to prevent reinvasion of snakeweed, downy brome, and annual forbs following control. This field study was replicated at two sites (Howell and Nephi, Utah) within the sagebrush-steppe biome. Snakeweed...
In desert ecosystems a large proportion of water and nitrogen is supplied in rain-induced pulses. It has been suggested that competitive interactions among desert plants would be most intense during these pulse periods of high resource availability. We tested this hypothesis with three cold desert shrub species of the Colorado Plateau (Gutierrezia sarothrae, Atriplex confertifolia, and Chrysothamnus nauseosus), which differ in their distribution of functional roots. In a three-year field study we conducted a neighbor removal experiment in conjunction with simulated 25-mm precipitation events and the addition of a nitrogen pulse in either spring or summer. We measured predawn water potential (?), gas exchange, leaf...
We hypothesise that genotypic differences in transpiration and root growth in the southern and northern populations of Gutierrezia sarothrae are driven by growing season vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and that ecotypic differentiations are linked to corresponding variations in tissue and leaf water relations. Seedlings from an Idaho (ID) and a Texas (TX) seed source were grown either in an open nursery (full sunlight) or under shade. There were no population differences in transpiration, root growth and tissue water relation parameters when the plants were grown under the shade. However, significant population differences were observed in the plants grown in the open where VPD was substantially higher. Transpiration...
Pressure-volume analyses were done on a half-shrub broom snakeweed (Gutierrezia sarothrae) subjected to different soil water regimes under pot- and field-grown conditions. Under pot and field conditions, water deficit decreased water and osmotic potentials. In the severely droughted pot-grown, osmotic potential at full turgor (?100) decreased by 0.44 MPa due to reduced symplastic volume, the result of a decreased leaf turgid to dry weight (TW/DW) ratio. A reduction of 0.86 MPa in ?100 was observed in the field-grown plants subjected to the first drought cycle, but increased cell wall elasticity occurred in the second drought cycle. The lowered ?100 was attributed to osmotic adjustment and reduced symplastic volume....
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In desert ecosystems a large proportion of water and nitrogen is supplied in rain-induced pulses. It has been suggested that competitive interactions among desert plants would be most intense during these pulse periods of high resource availability. We tested this hypothesis with three cold desert shrub species of the Colorado Plateau (Gutierrezia sarothrae, Atriplex confertifolia, and Chrysothamnus nauseosus), which differ in their distribution of functional roots. In a three-year field study we conducted a neighbor removal experiment in conjunction with simulated 25-mm precipitation events and the addition of a nitrogen pulse in either spring or summer. We measured predawn water potential (Ψ), gas exchange, leaf...


    map background search result map search result map Interspecific Competition and Resource Pulse Utilization in a Cold Desert Community Interspecific Competition and Resource Pulse Utilization in a Cold Desert Community