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Over the past several decades, the expansion and thickening of woodlands in the western United States has caused a range of ecological changes. Woody expansion often leads to increases in soil organic matter (SOM) pools with implications for both biogeochemical cycling and ecological responses to management strategies aimed at restoration of rangeland ecosystems. Here we directly measure C and N stocks and use simple non-steady-state models to quantify the dynamics of soil C accumulation under and around trees of varied ages in southern Utah woodlands. In the two pinyon-juniper forests of Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument studied here, we found approximately 3 kg C/m2 and approximately 0.12 kg N/m2 larger...
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The Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (GSENM) is undergoing a Management Plan amendment that will integrate livestock grazing and rangeland management with the management of GSENM objects and resources. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is applying a broad scale approach to this planning process by analyzing regional trends observed for the Colorado Plateau (COP) Rapid Ecoregional Assessment (REA) in relation to their distribution and status in GSENM. This Story Map looks at the following regional trend topics: Current Terrestrial Intactness, Habitat Connectivity, Road Density, and Sensitive Soils.


    map background search result map search result map Soil carbon storage responses to expanding pinyon–juniper populations in southern Utah BLM NOC REA Taking a Broad-Scale Approach to a Management Plan: GSENM Story Map Soil carbon storage responses to expanding pinyon–juniper populations in southern Utah BLM NOC REA Taking a Broad-Scale Approach to a Management Plan: GSENM Story Map