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Using funds from an NRDAR settlement, FWS obligated $557,810 ($2011) to TNC of Massachusetts for the purchase of permanent conservation easements on approximately 200 acres of riparian lands along the Housatonic River in Salisbury, Connecticut. Conservation of riparian habitat will help to (1) protect water quality; (2) protect nesting habitat for migratory songbirds and other wildlife, including several rare and endangered plants, turtles, salamanders and dragonflies; and (3) maintain the scenic, agrarian character of the region. These efforts provide a beneficial tradeoff from the harm to the river and associated wildlife caused by historical polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) contamination. Economic Impacts of...
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The Anacostia Watershed lies within the Chesapeake Bay drainage basin, and is one of the most urban watersheds within the basin. According to the Fish and Wildlife Service, the watershed spans over 175 square miles between Maryland and the District of Columbia and is considered by many to be one of the most degraded waterways in the United States. Watts Branch is a tributary stream of the Anacostia River, and flows into the Potomac River which eventually empties into the Chesapeake Bay. In 2010, several partnerships were formed to restore a section of the Watts Branch stream and riparian area. The restoration efforts were focused on a highly polluted 1.8 mile stretch of the stream, running from the border of Prince...
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Background information. In the late 1800s through the early 1900s, nearly all of the area that is now the Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge (Crab Orchard NWR) was either logged for timber or cleared and converted to other uses, particularly agriculture. By the 1930s, soils in the area were depleted and severely eroded. Additional clearing and development ensued with the establishment of the Illinois Ordnance Plant during World War II. In 2014, as part of the effort to restore Crab Orchard NWR lands to benefit wildlife, the refuge undertook the Hampton native prairie restoration project to convert a 62-acre nonnative cool-season hay field into a native warm-season grassland. The primary benefit of this restoration...
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This case study illustrates that even modest restoration projects can provide benefits to the environment and local economy. FWS provided $130,000 ($2011) over 2007–2011 to The Nature Conservancy of Rhode Island (TNC, RI) to implement a nesting habitat management program for the federally threatened piping plover, a shorebird that nests along sandy beaches on the Atlantic coast. The source of the funds was the NRDAR settlement for the North Cape Oil Spill. In 1996, the oil spill adversely impacted piping plover nesting habitat, resulting in fewer chicks produced during the following nesting season. To compensate for these impacts, natural resource trustees (FWS, RI, and NOAA) sought to increase the number of chicks...
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Background information. Site 36, the wastewater treatment plant on the Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge (Crab Orchard NWR), is one of 21 sites on the refuge that have been remediated. The wastewater treatment plant, which was constructed as part of the Illinois Ordnance Plant in 1942, was used to treat wastewater from industrial tenants until the spring of 2005. Through a series of drainages, the outfall from the plant eventually discharged into Crab Orchard Lake. The wastewater treatment plant and surrounding area, which covers approximately 50 acres, became contaminated with hazardous substances, such as polychlorinated biphenyls, heavy metals, pesticides, and dioxins. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS),...
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Migrating shorebirds and waterfowl are so dependent on the food supply and stopover estuary habitat in the lower Coquille River that Congress established Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge (OR) in 1983. Through congressionally approved expansion, acquisition, and donation, the Refuge now encompasses 889 acres and is composed of two units: Bandon Marsh and Ni-les'tun (named by the Coquille Tribe and pronounced NYE-les-ton, which means People by the small fish dam). Historically, Ni-les’tun was a diverse tidal wetland like Bandon Marsh but was diked and drained for agricultural purposes beginning in the mid to late 1800s. Restoring 418 acres of the tidal marsh has required FWS and its many partners to collaborate...


    map background search result map search result map Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge NRDAR Wastewater Treatment Plant Remediation & Restoration Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge NRDAR Prairie Restoration Ni-les'tun Tidal Marsh Restoration Conservation Easements Along the Housatonic River Piping Plover Nesting Habitat Management Program Watts Branch Urban Stream Restoration Watts Branch Urban Stream Restoration Piping Plover Nesting Habitat Management Program Conservation Easements Along the Housatonic River Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge NRDAR Wastewater Treatment Plant Remediation & Restoration Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge NRDAR Prairie Restoration Ni-les'tun Tidal Marsh Restoration