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This study examines the establishment patterns of exotic and ruderal species along trail corridors in grassland areas of the Colorado Front Range. The effects of trail presence, trail age, and trail traffic levels on exotic and ruderal species establishment are explored to ascertain the potential impacts of trails on surrounding vegetation. Established trails exhibited a greater presence of exotic and ruderal species along the immediate trailside, showing that disturbed trailsides tend to encourage the growth of these species over time. Furthermore, the established trails exhibited significantly less native, nonruderal, and overall species richness at the trailside. These trailside patterns did not show a significant...
Non-native shrub species in the genus Tamarix (saltcedar, tamarisk) have colonized hundreds of thousands of hectares of floodplains, reservoir margins, and other wetlands in western North America. Many resource managers seek to reduce saltcedar abundance and control its spread to increase the flow of water in streams that might otherwise be lost to evapotranspiration, to restore native riparian (streamside) vegetation, and to improve wildlife habitat. However, increased water yield might not always occur and has been substantially lower than expected in water salvage experiments, the potential for successful revegetation is variable, and not all wildlife taxa clearly prefer native plant habitats over saltcedar....
To assess the vulnerability of a region to invasive plants, documentation of the presence or absence of invasive plants is necessary. This project expands on work initiated by the EPA to identify invasive plants in rural communities in the Bristol Bay region. Eighteen additional Bristol Bay communities were inventoried for invasive plants in 2012-2014. This work provides a baseline for understanding the potential impact from these plants and the opportunity to treat the existing populations before they invade new areas.
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The introduction of exotic plant species into the western United States has caused substantial changes to rangeland disturbance regimes and ecosystem structure and function. For example, exotic annual grass (EAG) invasion in western rangelands has increased wildfire frequency, which greatly reduces rangeland ecosystem diversity and leads to single-species dominance in many areas. Rangeland monocultures do not provide optimal carbon sequestration and other environmental processes necessary to sustain historically normal ecosystem structure, including the ecological diversity needed to support sagebrush obligates like Greater Sagegrouse, pygmy rabbit, and pronghorn. These obligates, as well as others, require contiguous,...
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(THIS VERSION HAS BEEN SUPERSEDED by US-RIIS V2.0, November 2022, available at https://doi.org/10.5066/P9KFFTOD) Introduced (non-native) species that becomes established may eventually become invasive, so tracking introduced species provides a baseline for effective modeling of species trends and interactions, geospatially and temporally. The United States Register of Introduced and Invasive Species (US-RIIS) is comprised of three lists, one each for Alaska (AK, with 532 records), Hawaii (HI, with 6,075 records), and the conterminous United States (L48, with 8,657 records). Each list includes introduced (non-native), established (reproducing) taxa that: are, or may become, invasive (harmful) in the locality; are...
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We present an approach to quantitatively assess nonnative plant invasions at landscape scales from both habitat and species perspectives. Our case study included 34 nonnative species found in 142 plots (0.1 ha) in 14 vegeta- tion types within the Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument, Utah. A plot invasion index, based on nonnative species richness and cover, showed that only 16 of 142 plots were heavily invaded. A species invasive index, based on frequency, cover, and number of vegetation types invaded, showed that only 7 of 34 plant species were highly invasive. Multiple regressions using habitat characteristics (moisture index, elevation, soil P, native species richness, maximum crust development class,...
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Improved sampling designs are needed to detect, monitor, and predict plant migrations and plant diversity changes caused by climate change and other human activities. We propose a methodology based on multi-scale vegetation plots established across forest ecotones which provide baseline data on patterns of plant diversity, invasions of exotic plant species, and plant migrations at landscape scales in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA. We established forty two 1000-m2 plots in relatively homogeneous forest types and the ecotones between them on 14 vegetation transects. We found that 64% of the variance in understory species distributions at landscape scales were described generally by gradients of elevation...
To assess the vulnerability of a region to invasive plants, documentation of the presence or absence of invasive plants is necessary. This project identified invasive plants in rural communities in the Bristol Bay region. Villages were inventoried for invasive plant species; providing essential baseline to understand the potential impact from these plants and the opportunity to treat the existing populations before they invade new areas. The second part of the project used these data to assess the vulnerability of important subsistence plants to changes in pollination, as key insect species can be drawn to invasive plant populations.
To assess the vulnerability of a region to invasive plants, documentation of the presence or absence of invasive plants is necessary. This project expands on work initiated by the EPA to identify invasive plants in rural communities in the Bristol Bay region. Eighteen additional Bristol Bay communities were inventoried for invasive plants in 2012-2014. This work provides a baseline for understanding the potential impact from these plants and the opportunity to treat the existing populations before they invade new areas.
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Synopsis: This study examined the effect of road improvement and environmental variables on exotic and native plant diversity in roadside verges and adjacent semi-arid grassland, shrubland, and woodland communities of southern Utah. Researchers measured the cover of exotic and native species in roadside verges and both the richness and cover of exotic and native species in adjacent interior communities (50 meters beyond the edge of the road) along 42 roads stratified by level of road improvement (paved, improved surface, graded, and four-wheel drive track). Exotic species richness and cover were more than 50% greater, and the richness of native species 30% lower, at patch interiors adjacent to paved roads than those...
Non-native shrub species in the genus Tamarix (saltcedar, tamarisk) have colonized hundreds of thousands of hectares of floodplains, reservoir margins, and other wetlands in western North America. Many resource managers seek to reduce saltcedar abundance and control its spread to increase the flow of water in streams that might otherwise be lost to evapotranspiration, to restore native riparian (streamside) vegetation, and to improve wildlife habitat. However, increased water yield might not always occur and has been substantially lower than expected in water salvage experiments, the potential for successful revegetation is variable, and not all wildlife taxa clearly prefer native plant habitats over saltcedar....
We conducted a field experiment to assess effects of simulated above-average fall and spring precipitation on monoculture performance and competitive relations of the exotic annual grass Bromus tectorum and the native bunchgrass Stipa hymenoides in southeastern Utah. Between 1 October 1997 and 31 May 1998, "wet" plots received 239 mm and "dry" plots received 119 mm of water representing 175 and 87 percent of average precipitation, respectively. In monoculture, added water increased fall Bromus establishment by a factor of 1.6 but did not affect fall or winter growth. Added water adversely affected Bromus growth during early spring, but enhanced growth as soils dried during mid-spring. Overall, Bromus shoot production...
The positive effect of disturbance on plant community invasibility is one of the more consistent results in invasion ecology. It is generally attributed to a coincident increase in available resources (due to the disturbance) that allows non-resident plant species to establish (Davis MA, Grime JP Thompson K, J Ecol 88:528?534, 2000). However, most research addressing this issue has been in artificial or highly modified plant communities. Our goal in this study was to investigate the interactive effects of resource availability and plant mortality disturbance on the invasion of natural plant communities. We conducted a series of experiments that examined the response of Bromus tectorum L., a highly invasive annual...


    map background search result map search result map Monitoring shifts in plant diversity in response to climate change: a method for landscapes Impacts of recreation trails on exotic and ruderal species distribution in grassland areas along the Colorado Front Range. Evaluating plant invasions from both habitat and species perspectives Roads as conduits for exotic plant invasions in a semi-arid landscape. United States Register of Introduced and Invasive Species (US-RIIS) Monitoring shifts in plant diversity in response to climate change: a method for landscapes Impacts of recreation trails on exotic and ruderal species distribution in grassland areas along the Colorado Front Range. Evaluating plant invasions from both habitat and species perspectives Roads as conduits for exotic plant invasions in a semi-arid landscape. United States Register of Introduced and Invasive Species (US-RIIS)