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The CLR for the Kennecott mill town is divided into two parts. Part I includes the Site History, Existing Conditions, and the Analysis and Evaluation of cultural landscape characteristics. Part II includes Treatment of the cultural landscape and includes recommendations and a five-year management plan. The CLR is an interdisciplinary document, compiled by historical landscape architects, archeologists, mining historians, historical architects, planners, and natural resource specialists. The Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve serve initiated the project in the spring of 1997. In addition to park and regional staff in the Alaska office, project agreements with other NPS offices and contracts with Michigan...
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Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) offers many advantages for assessing archaeological potential in frozen and partially frozen contexts in high latitude and alpine regions. These settings pose several challenges for GPR, including extreme velocity changes at the interface of frozen and active layers, cryogenic patterns resulting in anomalies that can easily be mistaken for cultural features, and the difficulty in accessing sites and deploying equipment in remote settings. In this study we discuss some of these challenges while highlighting the potential for this method by describing recent successful investigations with GPR in the region. We draw on cases from Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern...
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This study was conducted for Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve to document Ahtna traditional knowledge of large land mammals, particularly caribou, Dall sheep and moose. Mountain goats are not included because there is no evidence that they were a significant resource. The research focused primarily on lands within the northern portions of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, a part of which is also the territory of the upper and lower Ahtna (see Figure 1). The territory of the latter encompasses all of the Chitina River and the Copper River from below Wood Canyon to about the mouth of the Tazlina River, while that of the former includes an area from the Sanford River north to Tanada and Copper Lakes, and...
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Recently documented ice patch sites in the southwest Yukon are ideal for evaluating precontact hunter-gatherer land-use patterns in the western subarctic. Located in the alpine of the mountainous regions of the boreal forest, ice patches are associated with well preserved hunting equipment, caribou ( Rangifer tarandus ) dung and an abundance of faunal remains dating to over 8000 years ago. However, current models are inadequate for explaining caribou hunting at ice patches as they tend to emphasize large-scale communal hunts associated with latitudinal movements of caribou. Much less is known about the alititudinal movment of caribou and the associated hunting forays to ice patches in the alpine. Based on literature...
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This dissertation examines one corner of the grammar of the Ahtna Athabaskan language of Alaska: the use and semantics of the lexical class of directionals. In particular, this dissertation looks at how Ahtna speakers use directionals in spontaneous discourse and elicitation against the backdrop of the physiography of Ahtna territory. The semantics of the directional system is traditionally riverine, meaning that the orientation of the local river local determines which directional term speakers choose. Talk about direction and location of referents in the natural landscape is common among Ahtna speakers: Ahtna people are traditionally seminomadic, and verbally displaying one's knowledge of overland travel through...
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Subsurface temperature profiles measured in boreholes are one of the important archives of paleoclimate data for reconstructing the climate of the past 2000 years. Subsurface temperatures are a function of past ground surface temperatures (GST), however GSTs are influenced both by changes in land-use and changes in regional climate. Thus the history of deforestation at borehole sampling locations represents a potential uncertainty in the reconstructed temperature history at the site. Here a fully coupled Earth system model is used estimate the magnitude of the subsurface temperature anomaly from deforestation events from a global perspective. The model simulations suggest that warming of the ground surface is the...


map background search result map search result map DECHYOO NJiK (MIVm-4) aD THE TRADITIONAL LAND USE PATTERNS IN THE SOUTHWESTERN PORTION OF THE OLD CROW FLATS, YUKON TERRITORY Some Ethnographic and Historical Information on the Use of Large Land Mammals in the Copper River Basin Caribou Hunting at Ice Patches: Seasonal Mobility and Long-term Land-Use in the Southwest Yukon Directional Reference, Discourse, and Landscape in Ahtna Gc/ms Analysis of Fatty Acids from Ancient Hearth Residues at the Swan Point Archaeological Site The Emerging Archaeology of Glaciers and Ice Patches: Examples from Alaska's Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve James Louis Giddings' Archaeological Tree-Ring Dating in the American Arctic: a Forgotten Legacy Climate, Vegetation, and Archaeology 14,000 to 9000 Cal Yr B.P. in Central Alaska The archaeology of eastern Beringia :some contrasts and connections A Thousand Years of Lost Hunting Arrows: Wood Analysis of Ice Patch Remains in Northwestern Canada Kennecott Mill Town: Cultural Landscape Report, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska Subsistence and Commercial Fisheries through the Lenses of Culture and Economy in Three Coastal Alaskan Communities Human Ecological Integration in Subarctic Eastern Beringia Holocene and Anthropocene Landscapes of Western Canada A middle Holocene steppe bison and paleoenvironments from the Versleuce Meadows, Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada Frozen: The Potential and Pitfalls of Ground-Penetrating Radar for Archaeology in the Alaskan Arctic A middle Holocene steppe bison and paleoenvironments from the Versleuce Meadows, Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada Frozen: The Potential and Pitfalls of Ground-Penetrating Radar for Archaeology in the Alaskan Arctic DECHYOO NJiK (MIVm-4) aD THE TRADITIONAL LAND USE PATTERNS IN THE SOUTHWESTERN PORTION OF THE OLD CROW FLATS, YUKON TERRITORY Human Ecological Integration in Subarctic Eastern Beringia Caribou Hunting at Ice Patches: Seasonal Mobility and Long-term Land-Use in the Southwest Yukon Gc/ms Analysis of Fatty Acids from Ancient Hearth Residues at the Swan Point Archaeological Site The Emerging Archaeology of Glaciers and Ice Patches: Examples from Alaska's Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve Kennecott Mill Town: Cultural Landscape Report, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska Some Ethnographic and Historical Information on the Use of Large Land Mammals in the Copper River Basin Directional Reference, Discourse, and Landscape in Ahtna Subsistence and Commercial Fisheries through the Lenses of Culture and Economy in Three Coastal Alaskan Communities A Thousand Years of Lost Hunting Arrows: Wood Analysis of Ice Patch Remains in Northwestern Canada Climate, Vegetation, and Archaeology 14,000 to 9000 Cal Yr B.P. in Central Alaska James Louis Giddings' Archaeological Tree-Ring Dating in the American Arctic: a Forgotten Legacy The archaeology of eastern Beringia :some contrasts and connections Holocene and Anthropocene Landscapes of Western Canada