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Despite the relationship between urbanization, energy use and CO2 emissions has been extensively studied in recent years, little attention has been paid to differences in development stages or income levels. Most previous studies have implicitly assumed that the impact of urbanization is homogenous for all countries. This assumption can be questionable as there are many characteristic differences among countries of different levels of affluence. This paper investigates empirically the effects of urbanization on energy use and CO2 emissions with consideration of the different development stages. Using the Stochastic Impacts by Regression on Population, Affluence and Technology (STIRPAT) model and a balanced panel...
Over the 1970s and 1980s, emissions of carbon dioxide from energy use fell in per capita, per unit GDP, and in some cases in absolute terms in 10 industrialized countries studied by LBNL. These declines were driven principally by falling end-use energy intensities and the decreasing carbon content of energy. By the early 1990s, however, a slowdown in the decline of intensities and the continued growth of GDP and energy services activity have reversed the trends in absolute emissions. LBNL concludes that CO2 emissions will continue to rise in the future unless energy intensities and/or the carbon content of energy can be decreased at an accelerated rate via policy changes, technological innovation and/or behavioural...
Despite the relationship between urbanization, energy use and CO2 emissions has been extensively studied in recent years, little attention has been paid to differences in development stages or income levels. Most previous studies have implicitly assumed that the impact of urbanization is homogenous for all countries. This assumption can be questionable as there are many characteristic differences among countries of different levels of affluence. This paper investigates empirically the effects of urbanization on energy use and CO2 emissions with consideration of the different development stages. Using the Stochastic Impacts by Regression on Population, Affluence and Technology (STIRPAT) model and a balanced panel...
Despite the relationship between urbanization, energy use and CO2 emissions has been extensively studied in recent years, little attention has been paid to differences in development stages or income levels. Most previous studies have implicitly assumed that the impact of urbanization is homogenous for all countries. This assumption can be questionable as there are many characteristic differences among countries of different levels of affluence. This paper investigates empirically the effects of urbanization on energy use and CO2 emissions with consideration of the different development stages. Using the Stochastic Impacts by Regression on Population, Affluence and Technology (STIRPAT) model and a balanced panel...
This paper deals with the methodologies and databases for comparative assessment of emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from the full energy chain (FENCH) of different energy sources. It largely refers to an international experts workshop on the topic held in October 1994 in Beijing, which was the first meeting in a series of IAEA expert meetings on comparison of FENCH-GHG emission from energy sources. The findings and recommendations of the workship cover topics such as time horizon, plant life time, materials flows and system output comparability.
Despite the relationship between urbanization, energy use and CO2 emissions has been extensively studied in recent years, little attention has been paid to differences in development stages or income levels. Most previous studies have implicitly assumed that the impact of urbanization is homogenous for all countries. This assumption can be questionable as there are many characteristic differences among countries of different levels of affluence. This paper investigates empirically the effects of urbanization on energy use and CO2 emissions with consideration of the different development stages. Using the Stochastic Impacts by Regression on Population, Affluence and Technology (STIRPAT) model and a balanced panel...
This article begins by defining energy services and identifying how they differ according to sector, urban and rural areas, and direct and indirect uses. It then investigates household energy services divided into three classes: lower income, middle income, and upper income. It finds that the primary energy technologies involved with low-income households involve a greater number of fuels and carriers, ranging from dung and fuelwood to liquefied petroleum gas and charcoal, but a fewer number of services. Middle-income households throughout the world tend to rely on electricity and natural gas, followed by coal, liquefied petroleum gas, and kerosene. These homes utilize energy to produce a much broader range services....