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This insert into the February 2013 Estuary news offers snapshots of how seven CA LCC projects have been laying the foundations for lasting cooperative conservation partnerships.
Purpose:The purpose of this Walker Basin Meadows Condition Report is twofold. First, it provides condition data and explains why the Walker Working Group chose the first set of meadows as the top priority for restoration. Second, the working group will use information presented here to plan subsequent restoration efforts once the first group of meadows is restored.Introduction:Meadows of the Walker River basin are an extremely valuable component of the landscape. Meadows provide diverse habitat, including habitat critical to endangered species. They reduce peak flows during storms and soak up spring runoff, recharging groundwater supplies. Meadows filter sediment, provide forage, and are important cultural and recreational...
In this CA LCC-funded Climate-Smart Conservation Planning effort, EcoAdapt’s climate adaptation scientists worked with National Forest conservation managers to conduct vulnerability assessments, develop climate-smart adaptation strategies and actions, and generate implementation plans for key habitats of Southern California, with a specific focus on four National Forests (Angeles, San Bernardino, Cleveland, Los Padres). This effort provides information and example case studies for USFS planning and management (e.g., Forest Plan Revisions, Climate Change Performance Scorecard) among other natural resource management and conservation efforts to prepare for climate change impacts in Southern California.
In this CA LCC-funded Climate-Smart Conservation Planning effort, EcoAdapt’s climate adaptation scientists worked with National Forest conservation managers to conduct vulnerability assessments, develop climate-smart adaptation strategies and actions, and generate implementation plans for key habitats of Southern California, with a specific focus on four National Forests (Angeles, San Bernardino, Cleveland, Los Padres). This effort provides information and example case studies for USFS planning and management (e.g., Forest Plan Revisions, Climate Change Performance Scorecard) among other natural resource management and conservation efforts to prepare for climate change impacts in Southern California.
Vulnerabilities of 27 resources were evaluated during the Vulnerability Assessment Workshop (held March 5-7, 2013); resources included 8 ecosystems (alpine/subalpine, yellow pine/mixed conifer, red fir, wet meadows and fens, oak woodlands, chaparral, sagebrush, and aquatic), 15 species (fisher, marten, bighorn sheep, wood rat, willow flycatcher, mountain quail, sage grouse, Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog, mountain yellow-legged frog, red fir, blue oak, black oak, whitebark pine, bristlecone pine, and aspen), and 4 ecosystem services (timber and wood products, carbon, fire, and recreation). The vulnerability assessment results are comprised of evaluations and comments from a participant breakout group during the...
2 matrices of existing climate change tools, the applicability of relevant tools for use in Southern California coastal wetlands, with information to help understand, choose, and use them, with guidance and sample outputs to help users incorporate them into their work. Will include updated information on the newest models. Two types of models: flood inundation and marsh accretion and habitat response. Audience: WRP Partner Agencies and stakeholders, other resource managers throughout Southern California, CA LCC and Partners.
The CA LCC and CA Department of Water Resources partnered to host a TEK training for natural resource managers and scientists. The aim was to foster ability to partner with tribes and understand traditional knowledge of the environment.
BayGEO Journal Article by Alicia Torregrosa explaining the challenges of mapping fog and the techniques used to create the Fog and Low Cloud Cover map generated from GOES imagery. Karl the Fog is a twitter handle @KarlTheFog for fog watchers.Intro:Within the world of mapping, clouds are a pesky interference to be removed from satellite remote sensed imagery. However, to many of us, that is a waste of pixels. Cloud maps are becoming increasingly valuable in the quest to understand land cover change and surface processes. In coastal California, the dynamic summertime interactions between air masses, the ocean, and topography result in blankets of fog and low clouds flowing into low lying areas of the San Francisco...
List of coastal wetland archetypes with additional information on hydrology and related functions and other issues that may affect management decisions Audience: WRP Partner Agencies and stakeholders, and other resource managers throughout Southern California.
The vulnerability of species at risk from climate change is recognized as an important issue in California as well as globally. Assessing vulnerability requires information on the long-term viability of populations and understanding the influences on that viability, due to environmental drivers as well as impacts of management action. We developed population-dynamic models to assess and better understand the long-term population viability of four key, tidal marsh-dependent species, under a variety of environmental conditions, including climate change impacts. In the San Francisco Estuary, each species is represented by one or more subspecies that is entirely or mainly confined to the tidal marsh habitat in the region:...
The large uncertainty surrounding the future effects of sea-level rise and other aspects of climate change on tidal marsh ecosystems exacerbates the difficulty in planning effective conservation and restoration actions. We addressed these difficulties in the context of large-scale wetland restoration activities underway in the San Francisco Estuary (Suisun, San Pablo and San Francisco Bays). We used a boosted regression tree approach to project the future distribution and abundance of five marsh bird species (through 2110) in response to changes in habitat availability and suitability as a result of projected sea-level rise, salinity, and sediment availability in the Estuary. To bracket the uncertainty, we considered...
A survey of natural resource specialists and land managers was conducted at the beginning of the Pacific Coastal Fog Project. Survey results showed that the most urgently needed dataset was a fog frequency map to help make better natural resource decisions for ecosystem restoration, conservation, and preparing for future climate conditions. Fog maps like these could show which areas receive more or less (or no) fog. This data would help land managers understand the influence of fog on patterns of vegetation distribution, wildfire severity, and stream temperature.The U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) has used satellite camera imagery feeds since 1960 to improve real-time weather forecasting. Originally the images...
We propose a statistically robust, logistically feasible, long-term monitoring program for wintering shorebirds in coastal California and northern Baja to track spatial and temporal population trends resulting from changing climate and habitat conditions. Specifically, we recommend a sampling design and survey protocol for wintering shorebirds in coastal wetland habitat and provide the data storage and analytical framework for population and trend estimates to be made annually as new data come in through the online data portal in the California Avian Data Center. We also recommend a series of needed pilot studies, including evaluating methods for estimating error rates in shorebird counts, determining the appropriate...
To climate scientists, marine fog’s physical opacity symbolizes how much remains to be discovered about the atmospheric phenomenon. This article outlines what is known and unknown about fog and its relationship with climate change.
Tidal marshes will be threatened by increasing rates of sea-level rise (SLR) over the next century. Managers seek guidance on whether existing and restored marshes will be resilient under a range of potential future conditions, and on prioritizing marsh restoration and conservation activities.Building upon established models, we developed a hybrid approach that involves a mechanistic treatment of marsh accretion dynamics and incorporates spatial variation at a scale relevant for conservation and restoration decision-making. We applied this model to San Francisco Bay, using best-available elevation data and estimates of sediment supply and organic matter accumulation developed for 15 Bay subregions. Accretion models...
Final Report to the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative (funding agency for CADS Phase 1), and interim report to the US Fish & Wildlife Service National Wildlife Refuge System Inventory and Monitoring Initiative.This report provides recommended resource allocations for conserving four subregions of San Francisco (SF) Bay, including North Bay, Suisun, Central Bay and South Bay. These recommendations are based on quantitative, subregional decision tools that were developed in collaboration with stakeholders working in each subregion. The authors of this report would like to thank all the participants, including the leadership team and other stakeholders that included natural resource managers and planners...
The USGS Coastal Ecosystem Response to Climate Change (CERCC) began in 2008 to deliver sea - level rise ecological response mod- els at a scale relevant for resource managers. Work was originally focused on the San Fran- cisco Bay estuary and then expanded to en- compass other Pacific coast sites. Our goal is to provide site specific measurements and results that land managers, planners, and those concerned with the conservation of near- shore habitats can use to make well - informed climate change adaptation strategies and deci- sions.
Strategic plans list eradication and surveillance species for a multi-county region, as agreed upon by local land managers. Most species are based on the Cal-IPC Inventory and maps in CalWeedMapper. The purpose of these plans is to enable land managers to apply for grants for coordinated projects in their region. The emphasis is on species that can be eradicated within five years and species that are just outside the region and have a high probability of invading. The plans are available on the CalWeedMapper website at https://calweedmapper.cal-ipc.org/regions/.
California Landscape Conservation Cooperative Project on estuarine shoals and vertebrate predators: In this report, we describe the integrated research program supported by the California LCC addressing sea level rise effects on estuarine shoals and the vertebrate predators dependent on these habitats. We present results from the first year objectives to determine the feasibility of the project and to: 1) host a modeling workshop with partners to identify what parameters are needed to model effects of sea level rise on the ecology of shoals and migratory birds; 2) use existing shoals modeling grids (Ganju and Schoellhamer 2010) to develop methodology for quantifying key metrics for habitat change; 3) conduct a comprehensive...