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The cumulative effects problem in natural resource management and land use planning stems from the difficulty of demonstrating that while each single land use change results in a negligible impact, the accumulation of these individual changes over time and within a landscape or region may constitute a major impact. This paper details a general approach to estimate the cumulative effects of land use change on wildlife habitat using Summit County, CO, USA as a case study. Our approach is based on a functional relationship between effect on habitat and distance from development. Within this building-effect distance, habitat is assumed to be degraded, producing a disturbance zone. We sum the total area within the disturbance...
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This data set defines boundaries of oil and gas project areas, greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) core areas, and non-core and non-project areas within the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI; southwestern Wyoming). Specifically, the data represents results from the manuscript “Combined influences of future oil and gas development and climate on potential Sage-grouse declines and redistribution” for high oil and gas development, low population size, and no climate component. The oil and gas development scenario were based on an energy footprint model that simulates well, pad, and road patterns for oil and gas recovery options that vary in well types (vertical and directional) and number...
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This data set defines boundaries of oil and gas project areas, greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) core areas, and non-core and non-project areas within the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI; southwestern Wyoming). Specifically, the data represents results from the manuscript “Combined influences of future oil and gas development and climate on potential Sage-grouse declines and redistribution” for low oil and gas development, low population size, and with effects of climate change under an RCP 8.5 scenario (2050). The oil and gas development scenario were based on an energy footprint model that simulates well, pad, and road patterns for oil and gas recovery options that vary in well types...
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This data set defines boundaries of oil and gas project areas, greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) core areas, and non-core and non-project areas within the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI; southwestern Wyoming). Specifically, the data represents results from the manuscript “Combined influences of future oil and gas development and climate on potential Sage-grouse declines and redistribution” for low oil and gas development, high population size, and no climate component. The oil and gas development scenario were based on an energy footprint model that simulates well, pad, and road patterns for oil and gas recovery options that vary in well types (vertical and directional) and number...
We have conducted a detailed analysis of costs associated with today’s technology for CO2 separation and capture at three types of power plants: integrated coal gasification combined cycles (IGCC), pulverized coal-fired simple cycles (PC), and natural gas-fired combined cycles (NGCC). The analysis was based on studies from the literature that analyzed the economics of capturing CO2 emitted at power plants. In this paper, we present a composite cost model and perform a sensitivity analysis to identify the cost-drivers for capture. We conclude that with new developments, CO2 capture and sequestration can become a cost-effective mitigation pathway.
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This data set defines boundaries of oil and gas project areas, greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) core areas, and non-core and non-project areas within the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI; southwestern Wyoming). Specifically, the data represents results from the manuscript “Combined influences of future oil and gas development and climate on potential Sage-grouse declines and redistribution” for high oil and gas development, low population size, and with effects of climate change under an RCP 8.5 scenario (2050) . The oil and gas development scenario were based on an energy footprint model that simulates well, pad, and road patterns for oil and gas recovery options that vary in well...
The cumulative effects problem in natural resource management and land use planning stems from the difficulty of demonstrating that while each single land use change results in a negligible impact, the accumulation of these individual changes over time and within a landscape or region may constitute a major impact. This paper details a general approach to estimate the cumulative effects of land use change on wildlife habitat using Summit County, CO, USA as a case study. Our approach is based on a functional relationship between effect on habitat and distance from development. Within this building-effect distance, habitat is assumed to be degraded, producing a disturbance zone. We sum the total area within the disturbance...
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This data set defines boundaries of oil and gas project areas, greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) core areas, and non-core and non-project areas within the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI; southwestern Wyoming). Specifically , the data represents results from the manuscript “Combined influences of future oil and gas development and climate on potential Sage-grouse declines and redistribution” for medium oil and gas development, high population size, and no climate component. The oil and gas development scenario were based on an energy footprint model that simulates well, pad, and road patterns for oil and gas recovery options that vary in well types (vertical and directional) and number...
The cumulative effects problem in natural resource management and land use planning stems from the difficulty of demonstrating that while each single land use change results in a negligible impact, the accumulation of these individual changes over time and within a landscape or region may constitute a major impact. This paper details a general approach to estimate the cumulative effects of land use change on wildlife habitat using Summit County, CO, USA as a case study. Our approach is based on a functional relationship between effect on habitat and distance from development. Within this building-effect distance, habitat is assumed to be degraded, producing a disturbance zone. We sum the total area within the disturbance...
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This project represents the data used in “Influences of potential oil and gas development and future climate on sage-grouse declines and redistribution.” The data sets describe greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) population change, summarized in different boundaries within the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI; southwestern Wyoming). Population changes were based on different scenarios of oil and gas development intensities, projected climate models, and initial sage-grouse population estimates. Description of data sets pertaining to this project: Greater sage-grouse population change (percent change) in a high oil and gas development, low population estimate scenario, and with and without...
Land and water resource development can independently eliminate riparian plant communities, including Fremont cottonwood forest (CF), a major contributor to ecosystem structure and functioning in semiarid portions of the American Southwest. We tested whether floodplain development was linked to river regulation in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) by relating the extent of five developed land-cover categories as well as CF and other natural vegetation to catchnient reservoir capacity, changes in total annual and annual peak discharge, and overall level of mainstem hydrologic alteration (sinall, moderate, or large) in 26 fourth-order subbasins. We also asked whether CF appeared to be in jeopardy at a regional...
The cumulative effects problem in natural resource management and land use planning stems from the difficulty of demonstrating that while each single land use change results in a negligible impact, the accumulation of these individual changes over time and within a landscape or region may constitute a major impact. This paper details a general approach to estimate the cumulative effects of land use change on wildlife habitat using Summit County, CO, USA as a case study. Our approach is based on a functional relationship between effect on habitat and distance from development. Within this building-effect distance, habitat is assumed to be degraded, producing a disturbance zone. We sum the total area within the disturbance...
Ultimately, the enhancement we need to deliver through environmental assessment is confidence that every approved undertaking will move us positively towards a desirable and durable future. In Canada, the most promising steps in this direction have been in several major project assessment reviews with public hearings and independent panels that applied a contribution to sustainability test. The most recent and advanced case is the review of a proposed C$16.2 billion natural gas infrastructure undertaking in the Northwest Territories. The Panel’s application of the contribution to sustainability test compared the cumulative effects, equity and legacy implications of a range of project pace and scale alternatives....


    map background search result map search result map Influences of Potential Oil and Gas Development and Future Climate on Sage-Grouse Declines and Redistribution Greater sage-grouse population change (percent change) in a high oil and gas development, low population estimate scenario, and with no effects of climate change (2006-2062) Greater sage-grouse population change (percent change) over 50-years in a high oil and gas development, low population estimate scenario, and with effects of climate change under an RCP 8.5 scenario (2050) Greater sage-grouse population change (percent change) in a low oil and gas development, high population estimate scenario, and with no effects of climate change (2006-2062) Greater sage-grouse population change (percent change) over 50-years in a low oil and gas development, low population estimate scenario, and with effects of climate change under an RCP 8.5 scenario (2050) Greater sage-grouse population change (percent change) in a moderate oil and gas development, high population estimate scenario, and with no effects of climate change (2006-2062) Influences of Potential Oil and Gas Development and Future Climate on Sage-Grouse Declines and Redistribution Greater sage-grouse population change (percent change) over 50-years in a high oil and gas development, low population estimate scenario, and with effects of climate change under an RCP 8.5 scenario (2050) Greater sage-grouse population change (percent change) over 50-years in a low oil and gas development, low population estimate scenario, and with effects of climate change under an RCP 8.5 scenario (2050) Greater sage-grouse population change (percent change) in a low oil and gas development, high population estimate scenario, and with no effects of climate change (2006-2062) Greater sage-grouse population change (percent change) in a moderate oil and gas development, high population estimate scenario, and with no effects of climate change (2006-2062) Greater sage-grouse population change (percent change) in a high oil and gas development, low population estimate scenario, and with no effects of climate change (2006-2062)