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Development of oil and gas wells leads to the destruction and fragmentation of natural habitat. Oil and gas wells also increase noise levels which has been shown to be detrimental to some wildlife species. Therefore, the density of oil and gas wells in the western United States was modeled based on data obtained from the National Oil and Gas Assessment.
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The UWRM proposal represents the uplands wildlands network in the Heart of the West Proposal. Utah-Wyoming Rocky Mountains Ecoregion (UWRM) core areas and linkages shapefile. This GIS dataset provides core areas and linkages that includes all the components of a three track approach (special elements, representation, and focal species) used during the planning process. This is the result of a study contract by The Nature Conservancy to design an ecoregional plan for Northern Utah, Western Wyoming, Southeastern Idaho, Northwest Colorado and South-central Montana. The study was developed in 2001 by Reed Noss, George Wuerthner, Ken Vance-Borland, and Carlos Carroll from Conservation Science, Inc.
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Boundary of the conservation assessment of Greater Sage-grouse and sagebrush habitat conducted by the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. The boundary is derived from the pre-settlement distribution of the Sage-grouse (Schroeder et al., 2004, Condor 106:363-376).
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Humans have dramatically altered wildlands in the western United States over the past 100 years by using these lands and the resources they provide. Anthropogenic changes to the landscape, such as urban expansion, construction of roads, power lines, and other networks and land uses necessary to maintain human populations influence the number and kinds of plants and wildlife that remain. We developed the map of the human footprint for the western United States from an analysis of 14 landscape structure and anthropogenic features: human habitation, interstate highways, federal and state highways, secondary roads, railroads, irrigation canals, power lines, linear feature densities, agricultural land, campgrounds, highway...
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This map depicts regions within the range of the Greater Sage-grouse that are non-Sage-grouse habitat. This information was complied using coverage of sagebrush for the western United States and a coverage of grassland habitats within 5km of an active Sage-grouse lek. This map has a 540m resolution.
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A complete set of wells associated with oil, natural gas, and coal bed natural gas development in the western states as of June 2004. This is a static dataset even though liquid energy development is a highly dynamic endeavor. Because these well location datasets are generally housed and managed by various state-based agencies (typically the state Oil and Gas Conservation Commissions) a uniform, spatially precise coverage for the western United States has not been available to date. This layer consolidates the best available well location data from ND, SD, MT, WY, CO, NM, UT, AZ, OR, and CA (ID and WA do not report any liquid energy development) and standardizes the attributites. While static as of June 2004 the...
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This map depicts the proportion of non-Sage-grouse habitat with 18km of each pixel. The map was produced using a moving window analysis on the Distribution of Non-Sage Grouse Habitat in the Conservation Assessment Area with a search radius of 18km. The product of the moving window was the mean pixel value within the window. This map has a 540m resolution.
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Humans have dramatically altered wildlands in the western United States over the past 100 years by using these lands and the resources they provide. Anthropogenic changes to the landscape, such as urban expansion, construction of roads, power lines, and other networks and land uses necessary to maintain human populations influence the number and kinds of plants and wildlife that remain. We developed the map of the human footprint for the western United States from an analysis of 14 landscape structure and anthropogenic features: human habitation, interstate highways, federal and state highways, secondary roads, railroads, irrigation canals, power lines, linear feature densities, agricultural land, campgrounds, highway...
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Humans have dramatically altered wildlands in the western United States over the past 100 years by using these lands and the resources they provide. Anthropogenic changes to the landscape, such as urban expansion, construction of roads, power lines, and other networks and land uses necessary to maintain human populations influence the number and kinds of plants and wildlife that remain. We developed the map of the human footprint for the western United States from an analysis of 14 landscape structure and anthropogenic features: human habitation, interstate highways, federal and state highways, secondary roads, railroads, irrigation canals, power lines, linear feature densities, agricultural land, campgrounds, highway...
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This model was constructed to model the risk of invasion by exotic plant species.Roads may directly influence exotic plant dispersal via disturbance during road construction or via alterations in soil regimes. For example, in Californian serpentine soil ecosystems exotic plant species can be found up to 1km from the nearest road , and Russian thistle (Salsola kali), an exotic forb growing along roads, is wind-dispersed over distances greater than 4km. Roads may also indirectly facilitate the dispersal of exotic grasses, such as crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum), via human seeding along road verges or in burned areas near roads as a management strategy to curb the establishment of less desirable exotic grass...
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This map depicts the proportion of non-Sage-grouse habitat with 54km of each pixel. The map was produced using a moving window analysis on the Distribution of Non-Sage Grouse Habitat in the Conservation Assessment Area with a search radius of 54km. The product of the moving window was the mean pixel value within the window. This map has a 540m resolution.
A complete set of wells associated with oil, natural gas, and coal bed natural gas development in the western states as of Nov 2007. This is a static dataset even though liquid energy development is a highly dynamic endeavor. Because these well location datasets are generally housed and managed by various state-based agencies (typically the state Oil and Gas Conservation Commissions) a uniform, spatially precise coverage for the western United States has not been available to date. This layer consolidates the best available well location data from ND, SD, MT, WY, CO, NM, UT, AZ, OR, and CA (ID and WA do not report any liquid energy development) and standardizes the attributites. While static as of Nov 2007 the well...
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Human-induced fires have increased the frequency at which fires occur on the landscape. Fires increase the probability of invasion by exotic plant species as well as destroy existing habitats. This model was developed to depict the density of human caused fire ignition points throughout the western United States. Data from the National Fire Ignition Database from 1986 to 2001 was used to calculate the density of human-induced fire ignitions (ignitions / km).
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We evaluated the fragmentation of the western United States by anthropogenic features. The addition of roads, railroads, and power lines to wildlands, and the conversion of wildlands to agricultural land and/or urban areas, induces fragmentation. We used the following spatial data sets to model anthropogenic fragmentation: agricultural land, populated areas, power lines, railroads, and roads. Because we were interested in the spatial arrangements of wildland patches and how anthropogenic fragmentation affects wildlife dispersal, we buffered some of these spatial data sets according to their area of influence. For example, the area of influence of interstate highways extends beyond the traffic lanes (Rowland et al....
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A complete set of wells associated with oil, natural gas, and coal bed natural gas development in the western states as of August 31, 2005. This is a static dataset even though liquid energy development is a highly dynamic endeavor. Because these well location datasets are generally housed and managed by various state-based agencies (typically the state Oil and Gas Conservation Commissions) a uniform, spatially precise coverage for the has not been available to date. This layer consolidates the best available well location data from MT, WY, CO, and UT(ID does not report any liquid energy development) and standardizes the attributites. The user is cautioned that this layer only contains known and reported wells and...
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This map depicts the proportion of non-Sage-grouse habitat with 5km of each pixel. The map was produced using a moving window analysis on the Distribution of Non-Sage Grouse Habitat in the Conservation Assessment Area with a search radius of 5km. The product of the moving window was the mean pixel value within the window. This map has a 540m resolution.


    map background search result map search result map all_wells_wus_1899-2007 The Human Footprint in the West The Human Footprint in the West Oil and Natural Gas Wells, Western U.S. Sage-grouse Conservation Assessment Boundary Exotic Plant Invasion Risk in the Western United States Human Caused Fire Density in the Western United States (1986 - 2001) Anthropogenic Fragmentation in the western United States The Human Footprint in the West Distribution of Non-Sage-grouse Habitat in the Conservation Assessment Area Proportion of Non-Sage-grouse Habitat Within an 5-km Radius Proportion of Non-Sage-grouse Habitat Within an 18-km Radius Oil and Gas Well Density in the Western United States Proportion of Non-Sage-grouse Habitat Within an 54-km Radius Oil and Gas Wells in the Wyoming Basins (8/31/2005) Utah-Wyoming Rocky Mountain Ecoregion Core Areas and Linkages Utah-Wyoming Rocky Mountain Ecoregion Core Areas and Linkages Oil and Gas Wells in the Wyoming Basins (8/31/2005) Proportion of Non-Sage-grouse Habitat Within an 5-km Radius Proportion of Non-Sage-grouse Habitat Within an 18-km Radius Proportion of Non-Sage-grouse Habitat Within an 54-km Radius Sage-grouse Conservation Assessment Boundary Distribution of Non-Sage-grouse Habitat in the Conservation Assessment Area Exotic Plant Invasion Risk in the Western United States Human Caused Fire Density in the Western United States (1986 - 2001) Oil and Gas Well Density in the Western United States The Human Footprint in the West The Human Footprint in the West Anthropogenic Fragmentation in the western United States The Human Footprint in the West all_wells_wus_1899-2007 Oil and Natural Gas Wells, Western U.S.