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Current binomial (presence/absence) model of Brown Creeper (Certhia americana) using a Boosted Regression Tree model (Hastie & Tibshirani 2000) informed by breeding season avian point count data, modeled vegetation types, and climate data from PRISM (Daly et al. 2004) averaged for the years 1971-2000.
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Freshwater Resilience, Highest and High, Watersheds for Complex and Non-complex Stream Networks, Northeast U.S. is one of a suite of products from the Nature’s Network project (naturesnetwork.org).As growing human populations increase the pace of climate and land use changes, estimating the resilience of freshwater systems will be increasingly important for delivering effective long-term conservation. A region-wide analysis of freshwater stream networks was developed by Mark Anderson and associates at The Nature Conservancy (Anderson et al., 2013) to estimate the capacity of each network to cope with climatic and environmental change. The analysis centered on the evaluation resiliency: characteristics that may...
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The percentage difference between mean modeled snow-water-equivalent (meters) on April 1 for the reference (1989-2011) climate period and mean modeled snow-water-equivalent on April 1 for the T4 climate change scenario. Reference period: the period 1989 – 2011 for the Upper Deschutes River Basin domain, for which observed historical meteorology is used for model input. T4 scenario: the observed historical (reference period) meteorology is perturbed by adding +4°C to each daily temperature record in the reference period meteorology, and this data is then used as input to the model.
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Mean modeled snow-water-equivalent (meters) on February 20, the date of peak basin-integrated mean modeled snow-water-equivalent (meters) for the T4 climate change scenario. Reference period: the period 1989 – 2011 for the Upper Deschutes River Basin domain, for which observed historical meteorology is used for model input. T4 scenario: the observed historical (reference period) meteorology is perturbed by adding +4°C to each daily temperature record in the reference period meteorology, and this data is then used as input to the model.
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This data set contains links that are important to each species' habitat network. Those important links are scored based on the percent currently under protection status, projected change in climate suitability by the middle of the 21st century, and projected change in percent urbanized by the middle of the 21st century. Important links were identified from all links in the networks of each species based on their Integral Index of Connectivity (dIIC). Any links with dIIC scores > 0.9 or which connected to nodes with dIIC > 0.9 were retained here as "important" links.
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An estimated value for the ability of managers to dirct actions to protect, restore, or mitigate species and habitats. We recognize that our preliminary estimates are arbitrary and fairly approximate, but argue that making these explicit within a framework will enable stakeholders and managers to conduct subsequent analyses to better support their decision making.
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The Visual Resource Management Classes data were provided by BLM.This dataset presents current and future change agent models and combined future potential for climate change (PFC) within Visual Resource Management Classes. Potential for change (PFC) was determined by calculating the maximum potential for change among all change agents within each 1 km reporting unit. Current and future landscape intactness (LCM_C_FZ and LCM_N_FZ) are based on measures of landscape development and invasive species. Current vegetation departure (VDEP) is based on LANDFIRE vegetation departure and characterizes the departure of current vegetation from historic reference vegetation conditions. Current and future human development (DEV_C_FZ...
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The Visual Resource Management Classes data were provided by BLM.This dataset presents current and future change agent models and combined future potential for climate change (PFC) within Visual Resource Management Classes. Potential for change (PFC) was determined by calculating the maximum potential for change among all change agents within each 1 km reporting unit. Current and future landscape intactness (LCM_C_FZ and LCM_N_FZ) are based on measures of landscape development and invasive species. Current vegetation departure (VDEP) is based on LANDFIRE vegetation departure and characterizes the departure of current vegetation from historic reference vegetation conditions. Current and future human development (DEV_C_FZ...
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Riparian and wetland systems were determined from NHD waterbodies, SWReGAP riparian landcover types, and LANDFIRE riparian existing vegetation types. Potential for change (PFC) was determined by calculating the maximum potential for change among all change agents within each 1 km reporting unit. Current and future landscape intactness (LCM_C_FZ and LCM_N_FZ) are based on measures of landscape development and invasive species. Current vegetation departure (VDEP) is based on LANDFIRE vegetation departure and characterizes the departure of current vegetation from historic reference vegetation conditions. Current and future human development (DEV_C_FZ and DEV_N_FZ) represent human development intensity values modeled...
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The Visual Resource Inventory Classes data were provided by BLM. This dataset presents current and future change agent models and combined future potential for climate change (PFC) within Visual Resource Inventory Classes. Potential for change (PFC) was determined by calculating the maximum potential for change among all change agents within each 1 km reporting unit. Current and future landscape intactness (LCM_C_FZ and LCM_N_FZ) are based on measures of landscape development and invasive species. Current vegetation departure (VDEP) is based on LANDFIRE vegetation departure and characterizes the departure of current vegetation from historic reference vegetation conditions. Current and future human development (DEV_C_FZ...
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Riparian and wetland systems were determined from NHD waterbodies, SWReGAP riparian landcover types, and LANDFIRE riparian existing vegetation types. Potential for change (PFC) was determined by calculating the maximum potential for change among all change agents within each 1 km reporting unit. Current and future landscape intactness (LCM_C_FZ and LCM_N_FZ) are based on measures of landscape development and invasive species. Current vegetation departure (VDEP) is based on LANDFIRE vegetation departure and characterizes the departure of current vegetation from historic reference vegetation conditions. Current and future human development (DEV_C_FZ and DEV_N_FZ) represent human development intensity values modeled...
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Background Climate change during the past century has resulted in changes to precipitation amounts, form (rain vs. snow), as well as frequency and intensity in the northeastern US (Huntington et al., 2009). Additional changes in precipitation are forecast for the 21st Century as the global and regional climate is expected to warm substantially (Hayhoe et al., 2007). These ongoing and projected future changes in precipitation along with other related changes to evapotranspiration rates and land use patterns will result in changes in streamflow patterns as well (Hayhoe et al., 2007). Although precipitation amounts have generally increased in the Northeast during the past 20-30 years (Huntington et al., 2009),...
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Background Streams and rivers are an important environmental resource and provide water for many human needs. Streamflow is a measure of the volume of water carried by rivers and streams. Changes in streamflow can directly influence the supply of water available for human consumption, irrigation, generating electricity, and other needs. In addition, many plants and animals depend on streamflow for habitat and survival. Streamflow naturally varies over the course of a year. For example, rivers and streams in many parts of the country have their highest (peak) flow when snow melts in the spring. The amount of streamflow is important because high flows can cause erosion and damaging floods, while very low flows...
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Montane Conifer Connectivity of areas of low elevation and low human footprint in the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative study area. This application provides Montane Conifer Connectivity for 2000 and 2080 (A1B). The North Pacific Forest Landscape Connectivity Project uses three main geospatial layers as inputs into the creation of resistance map grids. One-km was decided as the resolution for the final resistance grids. The three primary geospatial layers used in this analysis were a digital elevation model (DEM), a vegetation layer, and a human footprint layer. Due to the geographic extent of the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative, digital elevation models from different sources...
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This dataset shows modelled habitat suitability for the Pacific-slope Flycatcher (Empidonax difficilis) under current and projected future conditions. We built habitat suitability models for 237 bird, 117 mammal, and 12 amphibian species. Species were chosen for inclusion in the study based on a simple set of criteria. For a species to be included in the study, it had to be primarily associated with terrestrial habitats, have a digital map of its current range, and have some portion of its current distribution intersect with the study area extent. In addition, we restricted the list of species used in the study to those for which a well-performing continental-scale model could be built. Digital species range maps...
This project gallery includes all project reports and associated assessment materials, including interactive and downloadable connectivity and climate datasets for the project " Creating Practitioner-driven, Science-based Plans for Connectivity Conservation in a Changing Climate: A Collaborative Assessment of Climate-Connectivity Needs in the Washington-British Columbia Transboundary Region".
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Mean modeled snow-water-equivalent (meters) on March 13, the date of peak basin-integrated mean modeled snow-water-equivalent (meters) for the T2 climate change scenario. Reference period: the period 1989 – 2011 for the Upper Deschutes River Basin domain, for which observed historical meteorology is used for model input. T2 scenario: the observed historical (reference period) meteorology is perturbed by adding +2oC to each daily temperature record in the reference period meteorology, and this data is then used as input to the model.


map background search result map search result map Montane Conifer Connectivity of areas of low elevation and low human footprint in the NPLCC, 2080 (A1B) Pacific-slope Flycatcher (Empidonax difficilis) Habitat Suitability Change Models Northern Leopard Frog: 2030 Habitat Suitability Consensus of All Models Adaptive Capacity, Low Range Development of a Graphical User Interface (GUI) to Predict Streamflow Statistics using USGS Streamstats and Precipitation from Downscaled Global Climate Change Models Hydrologic Climate Change Indicators Modeled snow-water-equivalent, percent difference between historical and projected April 1 values under T4 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, projected seasonal peak values under T2 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, projected seasonal peak values under T4 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Freshwater Resilience, Highest and High, Watersheds for Complex and Non-complex Stream Networks, Northeast U.S Important links for Black bear, Rafinesque's big-eared bat, and timber rattlesnake BLM REA NGB 2011 Western juniper Climate Change Viability in the NGB 2030 BLM REA NGB 2011 Ponderosa pine Climate Change Current Viability in the NGB BLM REA SLV 2013 Riparian Wetland PFC BLM REA SLV 2013 VRI PFC 1km Poly N Landscape Intactness BLM REA SLV 2013 VRM PFC 1km Poly C HumanDev BLM REA SLV 2013 VRM PFC 1km Poly N HumanDev BLM REA SLV 2013 Riparian Wetland PFC Fire Modeled snow-water-equivalent, percent difference between historical and projected April 1 values under T4 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, projected seasonal peak values under T2 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] Modeled snow-water-equivalent, projected seasonal peak values under T4 climate change scenario, Upper Deschutes River Basin, Oregon [full and clipped versions] BLM REA SLV 2013 VRI PFC 1km Poly N Landscape Intactness BLM REA SLV 2013 VRM PFC 1km Poly C HumanDev BLM REA SLV 2013 VRM PFC 1km Poly N HumanDev BLM REA SLV 2013 Riparian Wetland PFC BLM REA SLV 2013 Riparian Wetland PFC Fire Northern Leopard Frog: 2030 Habitat Suitability Consensus of All Models Development of a Graphical User Interface (GUI) to Predict Streamflow Statistics using USGS Streamstats and Precipitation from Downscaled Global Climate Change Models BLM REA NGB 2011 Western juniper Climate Change Viability in the NGB 2030 BLM REA NGB 2011 Ponderosa pine Climate Change Current Viability in the NGB Freshwater Resilience, Highest and High, Watersheds for Complex and Non-complex Stream Networks, Northeast U.S Adaptive Capacity, Low Range Important links for Black bear, Rafinesque's big-eared bat, and timber rattlesnake Pacific-slope Flycatcher (Empidonax difficilis) Habitat Suitability Change Models Montane Conifer Connectivity of areas of low elevation and low human footprint in the NPLCC, 2080 (A1B) Hydrologic Climate Change Indicators