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The Checkered Madtom (Noturus flavater) is found in moderate to high gradient, clear, small to medium rivers with strong flow and uses deeper, quiet pools or backwaters of these streams. This type of habitat has been eliminated from part of its former range in the White River, Arkansas, due to dam construction.
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The Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) has declined across its entire range due largely to loss of breeding habitat and overharvest, with much of it as illegal harvesting for caviar. Although conservation efforts have stabilized this species in the Central Mississippi States, a continued decline is expected due to overharvest, introduced species (particularly Asian Carp), and pollution. Other threats include channelization and dam construction that have blocked seasonal migration to suitable spawning sites which isolates individual populations and lead to breeding issues. Some characteristics of its life history, such as length of time to reach sexual maturity, make it susceptible to decline and slow to recover.
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There are nine large dams on the 652-mile (1,049-kilometer) Tennessee River. There are another 23 large dams on the tributaries to the Tennessee River. Protected areas in the region ensure the recovery of endangered and threatened species of animals and plants, including the Longnose Darter, Ozark Cavefish, and Ozark Cave Crayfish. Six large reservoirs were created by dams in the White River Basin, Arkansas, from 1911 through 1960 and required the displacement of a large number of people. Nearly 400 people in Baxter County, Arkansas, were displaced to make way for the reservoir created by the Norfork Dam. The town of Forsyth, Missouri, was relocated in its entirety to a spot 2 miles (3.2 kilometers) from its previous...
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The Ozark Cavefish (Amblyopsis rosea) is found in specific cave systems with clean flowing groundwater. These systems suffer from human use of and (or) alterations to the cave systems. Recreational cavers can damage the cave ecosystem or interrupt breeding, causing this species to leave the cave, unlikely to return. Some caves have been flooded by the creation of reservoirs or have dried up because of lowered water tables from excessive groundwater pumping or water diversion.
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The Ozark Shiner (Notropis ozarcanus) requires creeks and small rivers with gravel or rocky bottoms and strong, permanent flow. The Ozark Shiner has disappeared from many stream reaches that are below impoundments and receive cold-water releases. These dams and reservoirs also serve as barriers that prevent colonization of suitable habitat. Increases in turbidity, siltation from land practices, gravel removal operations, and nutrient enrichment from poultry and swine farms are additional threats to this unique minnow species.


    map background search result map search result map Habitat Trouble for Ozark Shiner in Central Mississippi River States Facts About Central Mississippi River States Habitat Trouble for Paddlefish in Central Mississippi River States Habitat Trouble for Ozark Cavefish in Central Mississippi River States Habitat Trouble for Checkered Madtom in Central Mississippi River States Habitat Trouble for Ozark Shiner in Central Mississippi River States Facts About Central Mississippi River States Habitat Trouble for Paddlefish in Central Mississippi River States Habitat Trouble for Ozark Cavefish in Central Mississippi River States Habitat Trouble for Checkered Madtom in Central Mississippi River States