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This item provides the ScienceBase query that identifies components of the fish habitat assessments within the Central Midwest States. It also contains a link to a configuration file that pulls these pieces of information into a logical order. This information can be accessed through the ScienceBase API to display a summary of fish habitat assessment information for the Central Mississippi River States.
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The Crystal Darter (Crystallaria asprella) requires large, clear-water streams with clean sand and gravel bottoms and moderate to swift currents. It is intolerant of siltation and other forms of pollution from various land use practices. Direct habitat degradation from damming, channelization, and dredging has also reduced habitat for this species. Remaining populations have become isolated from one another by dams and impoundments. The Mississippi River most likely no longer serves as a usable corridor for the Crystal Darter because of the silt load. The isolated local populations are then vulnerable to single destructive events such as toxic chemical spills.
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Partnership - Ohio River Basin Fish Habitat Partnership The Ohio River Basin Fish Habitat Partnership (ORBFHP) identified the Eel River in northern Indiana as a priority area based on their science-based modeling process. Two fish, the Greater Redhorse and the Redside Dace, and a number of mussels that are classified as imperiled in Indiana exist in this river. Partnership involvement in this priority watershed has been instrumental in the establishment of critical conservation partnerships with the goal of a holistic approach to watershed ecological integrity in the Eel River. Partners engaged in collaboration conservation of the Eel River watershed include: the Manchester University Environmental Studies...
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A. Pervasive disturbances: The most common disturbances based on total stream length in a given region. Top five overall most pervasive disturbances to all stream reaches, regardless of stream size and across all spatial scales (ranked highest first): Crop land use Low intensity urban land use Pasture and hay land use Impervious surface cover Population density Top three most pervasive disturbances to creeks (watersheds <100 km 2 in area) across all spatial scales: Crop land use Low intensity urban land use Pasture and hay land use Top three most pervasive disturbances to rivers (watersheds >100 km 2 in area) across all spatial scales : Crop land use Impervious surface cover Pasture and hay land use Top...
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Map of the risk of current fish habitat degradation of inland streams of the Central Midwest States.
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A significant number of dams are located in Iowa (> 4,000), Illinois (> 1,759), Indiana (> 1,088) and Ohio (> 2,600). Dams in the Central Midwest were built to provide mechanical power for mills, hydropower, recreation, water supplies, and water retention for urban and agricultural use. Nearly all of these dams impede fish movements in the region and particularly in the Mississippi River drainage and in the watershed of lakes Erie and Michigan. Some communities are removing dams to deal with obsolete infrastructure issues and to improve water quality, flow, and stream connectivity. For example, the removal of Black Berry Creek Dam near Aurora, Illinois in 2013 opened up 32 miles of the Fox River for fish spawning...
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Partnerships - Driftless Area Restoration Effort, Great Lakes Basin Fish Habitat Partnership, Ohio River Basin Fish Habitat Partnership, Reservoir Fisheries Habitat Partnership, and Fishers and Farmers Partnership Restored 738 acres of wetland and over 400 feet of stream habitat in Ohio. Removed 1 barrier in Iowa that reconnected 69 miles of stream habitat for Smallmouth Bass and many coolwater species. Restored 1750 feet of shoreline and added 100 feet of structure to lake shorelines in Illinois. Augmented three mussel populations on four Indiana rivers, giving two federally-endangered species a new foothold in the basin. Launched a basin-wide mussel initiative to identify and address stressors in quality streams...
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Relative condition of fish habitat in streams of the Central Midwest States. Histogram shows percentage of total stream length in each condition class.
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The Greater Redhorse (Moxostoma valenciennesi) is sensitive to habitat changes, particularly excessive siltation, and pollution. Other threats include river channelization, alterations to flow regimes, dam construction, and removal of riverside vegetation. Barriers are especially problematic as this is a wide-ranging species that has different flow and habitat requirements for different stages of development.
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In the 1990s, urban land in Ohio, Illinois, and Indiana increased by about 10 percent. Currently, Ohio and Illinois are among the 10 most populous states in the nation, while Indiana is 16th. Over 31 million people live in these three states. Large cities such as Chicago, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, and Cleveland, as well as the suburban sprawl throughout the region, have created large areas of impervious surfaces and urban pollution near the rivers and lakes. These factors are known to degrade fish habitat by changing water flow (hydrology) and by adding excessive amounts of nutrients, pollutants and sediment into the waters in this region.
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The Northern Madtom (Noturus stigmosus) is a small member of the catfish family that requires fast currents and complex rocky habitat. It faces a host of habitat threats including competition with invasive species, climate change, siltation, loss of habitat, excessive turbidity, and poor water quality. Channelization of small streams in this region is a significant threat to this species.
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Northern Ohio, Indiana and Illinois are part of the Factory Belt, an area that was a primary center of manufacturing and industry from the late 1800s to the late 1900s. The manufacturing processes resulted in discharges of a broad range of toxins to local waterways. PCBs and dioxins, which have been banned for more than a decade, still pose a problem in the area’s rivers, lakes, and reservoirs because these industrial chemicals do not break down over time. For example, the Ashtabula River, in northeast Ohio, flows into Lake Erie and has been severely contaminated by a multitude of hazardous substances from legacy industrial discharges. This resulted in a 45 percent reduction in fish species, a 52 percent reduction...
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Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio constitute the majority of what is known as the Corn Belt, the most intensive agricultural region in the U.S. with corn and soybeans as the predominant crops. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture 61 percent of the acreage of the Central Midwest region was cropland in 2012. The corn and soybean is fed to livestock, making this a key area for the production of hogs, chickens, and cattle. The production of ethanol as a fuel additive has greatly increased corn production and Conservation Reserve Program land has increasingly become farmed again as agricultural commodity prices have increased from increased product demand. Runoff and drainage from agricultural fields and...
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The Central Midwest states influence some of the nation’s major rivers, such as the Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Des Moines, Wabash, and Illinois Rivers. These states also border lakes Michigan and Erie, and contain numerous reservoirs, impoundments, and smaller natural lakes. The Central Midwest states have experienced nearly two centuries of urban expansion, manufacturing, agriculture, and mineral extraction. As an example, of the 26,000 miles of streams and rivers in Illinois, only 240 acres of stream and river habitat are now considered high quality natural areas. These factors influenced this assessment, which estimated that 67 percent of the Central Midwestern river and stream miles have a high or very...
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The Ohio River flows through or borders six States and is 981 miles (1,579 kilometers) long, starting at the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and ending in Cairo, Illinois, where it flows into the Mississippi River. At the confluence, the Ohio River is considerably bigger than the Mississippi River. More than 25 million people, almost 10 percent of the U.S. population, live in the Ohio River Basin, and it is source of drinking water for more than 3 million people even though many sections do not meet water quality standards for bacteria and pathogens, PCBs, lead, mercury, metals, organics, and other pollutants. There are 20 dams on the Ohio River that are managed by...
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Partnership - Fishers and Farmers Partnership The Boone River Watershed is included in the Mississippi River Basin Initiative and is a priority watershed of the Fishers & Farmers Partnership, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR), and the Nature Conservancy (TNC). The Boone River is a tributary of the Des Moines River in north-central Iowa. Current and past land use practices in the Boone River Watershed have affected both water flows and currents through excessive siltation. As a result, oxbow habitat has been degraded and fragmented and water quality impaired. Oxbows are wetlands, ponds or lakes, often crescent shaped, that form when a stream reach becomes separated from the main stream when sedimentation...


    map background search result map search result map Central Midwest States - Risk of Current Fish Habitat Degradation Map Summary of Scientific Findings for Central Midwest States Habitat Trouble for Crystal Darters in Central Midwest States Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Eel River, Indiana Habitat Trouble for Greater Redhorse in Central Midwest States Most Pervasive and Severe Disturbances for the Central Midwest States Facts about Central Midwest States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Central Midwest States Fish Habitat Partnerships Making A Difference in the Boone River Watershed, Iowa Habitat Trouble for Northern Madtom in Central Midwest States Fish Habitat Partnership Activities for the Central Midwest States Central Midwest States - Risk of Current Degradation Chart (Stream Length) Description of Point Source Pollution as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Central Midwest States Description of Dams and Other Barriers as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Central Midwest States Description of Agriculture as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Central Midwest States Central Midwest States - Risk of Current Fish Habitat Degradation Map Summary of Scientific Findings for Central Midwest States Habitat Trouble for Crystal Darters in Central Midwest States Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Eel River, Indiana Habitat Trouble for Greater Redhorse in Central Midwest States Facts about Central Midwest States Description of Urban Land Use as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Central Midwest States Fish Habitat Partnerships Making A Difference in the Boone River Watershed, Iowa Habitat Trouble for Northern Madtom in Central Midwest States Fish Habitat Partnership Activities for the Central Midwest States Central Midwest States - Risk of Current Degradation Chart (Stream Length) Description of Point Source Pollution as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Central Midwest States Description of Dams and Other Barriers as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Central Midwest States Description of Agriculture as a Human Activity Affecting Fish Habitat in Central Midwest States