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Summary The Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Long Term Monitoring (LTM) network has supported the collection of stream chemistry data in the Catskills since the 1990s. Trends in stream chemistry have periodically been evaluated in these streams but the most recent assessments only extend through the early 2000s. An updated assessment of stream chemistry trends will help evaluate the effects of recent substantial declines in acid deposition during the last decade. This study will evaluate changes in surface water chemistry from 1991 through 2013 at 5 stations in the Neversink and Rondout watersheds in the Catskill Mountains of New York. The results will be compared to changes in atmospheric deposition...
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Problem - Acidic precipitation has affected forested and aquatic ecosystems in New York, particularly in the Adirondack and Catskill regions. Acidification of surface waters and deleterious effects on fish and other biota have been well documented in both these regions. Despite reduced levels of acidity in atmospheric deposition over the past 20 years across New York and the northeastern United States, the most acid-sensitive streams and lakes have not yet begun to recover, and many show continued declines in acid-neutralizing capacity, an indicator acid-base status. Many studies have documented the effects of acid precipitation in New York, but thus far, there has been no comprehensive effort to synthesize and...
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Background With few exceptions, the contemporary and past effects of acidification on fish populations and communities in streams across acid-sensitive regions of NY have not been documented. The pervasive lack of information only permits anecdotal insight into the spatial effects of acidification on stream-fish assemblages and essentially precludes any broad effort to quantify temporal trends and potential recovery of fish assemblages in less acidic or less toxic streams. Though the effects of acidification on fish assemblages have been qualified in several streams of the eastern Adirondacks during 1979, the 1980s, and early 2000s, (Schofield and Driscoll 1987; Simonin et al. 2005) quantitative impacts were...
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Problem - A variety of factors potentially impact natural resources in the Neversink River basin and in other tributaries to the Upper Delaware River along the New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey boarders in the northeastern US. Increased urbanization within most watersheds of the Delaware River has decreased forested lands and ground permeability; fractionated forests, streams, and rivers; impounded flowing waters, and discharged municipal, agricultural, and industrial pollutants into many waterways. The effects on water quality and hydrology have been quantified relatively well. The direct impacts of these perturbations on biological components of stream and river ecosystems are sometimes known, however, more...
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The growth of temperate forests is typically limited by the availability of nitrogen. Elevated concentrations of nitrate in some Catskill Mountain streams, which are tributary to New York City's water-supply reservoirs west of the Hudson River, indicate that the forests of this region are at the early stages of nitrogen saturation. That is, nitrogen is available in excess of the amount utilized by vegetation and soil microorganisms in the forests. Nitrogen saturation is a concern because the mobile nitrate that moves through soil is accompanied by other nutrients such as the base cations calcium and magnesium that are necessary for forest growth but are present in short supply in some Catskill soils. And, nutrient...
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Problem - The New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP) Stream Management Program, in cooperation with local Soil and Water Conservation Districts, is implementing stream-restoration demonstration projects to decrease channel bed and bank erosion and improve water quality (lower suspended sediment and turbidity) in several priority streams of the Catskill Mountain Region (Fig. 1). A variety of issues relating to (a) the hydraulic geometry of stable and unstable stream channels, (b) validation of underlying assumptions used to characterize channel stability and design, and (c) the effects of restoration on stream-channel geomorphology, stability, biota, and sediment transport have not been...
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The overall goal of this project has been the development of forest health and sensitivity indicators and “1st-generation” maps of potential sensitivity to disturbance for lands within watersheds of the NYC water supply in the Catskill Mountains of New York. The methodologies and data layers created in this effort can now be used to aid management decisions and help determine the extent and magnitude of terrestrial and aquatic responses to acidic deposition. The data products derived from this effort have been produced and documented in such a manner that stakeholders can now use these products for site evaluation as well as to perform more extensive analysis on the suite of readily available GIS and image-based...
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This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data release contains batch formatted annual peak streamflow data (PkFlows_AllSites.txt) for the respective periods of record (through the 2020 or 2021 water year) for seven USGS streamgages in the upper Esopus Creek watershed in upstate New York. This data release also contains batch formatted specification (PkFlows_AllSites.psf) and output (PEAKFLOWS_ALLSITES.PRT) files from log-Pearson type III (LPIII) flood-frequency analysis of the annual peak streamflow data from version 7.3 of the USGS PeakFQ software (https://water.usgs.gov/software/PeakFQ/), and a csv file (FloodFrequencyEstimates.csv) with estimates of flood magnitudes for selected annual exceedance probabilities from...
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This dataset contains the results from aging and back-calculation of length-at-age of scale samples from 502 Rainbow Trout captured in the Ashokan Reservoir between 1952 and 2017. The first six columns contain collection information including an assigned fish number, the year and period of capture, the basin of the Ashokan Reservoir from which a fish was captured, and the length and weight of the fish when it was captured. The final three columns present results from the aging and back-calculation procedures. Multiple rows of information often correspond to an individual fish and are designated by the "Fish number" column.
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The upper Esopus Creek is the primary tributary to the Ashokan Reservoir, part of the New York City (NYC) water supply system. Suspended-sediment concentration (ssc) and turbidity are primary water-quality concerns in the NYC water-supply system, particularly in the upper Esopus Creek watershed. In 2016 the NYC Department of Environmental Protection and U.S. Geological Survey entered into a collaborative agreement to conduct a comprehensive study of suspended sediment and turbidity in the upper Esopus Creek watershed. Objectives included ssc, streamflow, and turbidity monitoring, and development of turbidity-ssc regression equations to estimate ssc from continuous turbidity measurements. Cross-section and point...
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This data product contains soil chemistry data from 4 locations. Two of the locations were located in the Neversink River watershed near Claryville, NY (01435000) in the Catskill Mountains of New York (Fall Brook and Winnisook Creek), 1 of the locations was the Young Woman’s Creek watershed near Renovo, PA (01545600) and the last site was the Wild River watershed at Gilead, Maine (01054200). Soil chemistry was collected at 2 times at each location: in 2001 and 2011 in Fall Brook, Young Woman’s Creek and Wild River and in 1993 and 2012 in Winnisook. This data product also contains water-quality data from 5 water-quality stations: West Branch Neversink River at Winnisook Lake [01434021], East Branch Neversink River...
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Summary The Long-Term Monitoring Network (LTM) is funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to monitor trends in surface water quality by nesting a few intensively-monitored stations within a network of more numerous but less frequently sampled stations. The intensively-monitored stations have provided monthly discharge and water-quality data at 6 locations across the country since 1983. Continuous discharge and storm water quality sampling were added to these stations in the late 1980’s. One of the major objectives of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) was to establish a network of stations for long-term monitoring of surface-water quality and to determine its relation to changes in atmospheric...
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The distribution of mercury (Hg) and sites of greatest Hg methylation are poorly understood in Catskill Mountain watersheds. Although concentrations of Hg in the water column are low, high concentrations of Hg in smallmouth bass and walleye have led to consumption advisories in most large New York City reservoirs in the Catskill Mountains. Mercury in natural waters can exist in many forms, including gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0), dissolved and particulate inorganic forms (Hg(II)), and dissolved and particulate methylmercury (MeHg). Most Hg in living organisms is MeHg, a highly neurotoxic form that bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs. The production of MeHg by methylation of inorganic Hg in the environment...
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The Catskill Mountains of southeastern New York receive among the highest loads of acid deposition in New York and the northeastern U.S. Additionally, the Catskills are underlain by sandstone and conglomerate, which is base poor and weathers slowly. Thus, the Catskills contain numerous streams with low (< 50 µeq/L) acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) and are sensitive to impacts from atmospheric acid deposition. Since at least 1983, however, the levels of acidity in atmospheric deposition (primarily sulfuric acid) have been declining in the Catskills and throughout New York. While widespread recovery of streams in the Catskills has not yet been confirmed, recent data suggest that recovery in waters with ANC values...
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The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Ashokan Watershed Stream Management Program, investigated the feasibility of bedload monitoring in the upper Esopus Creek watershed, Ulster and Greene Counties, New York (NY), from 2017 to 2020. Traditional bedload samples were collected at two locations: Birch Creek at Big Indian, NY, and Stony Clove at Jansen Rd at Lanesville, NY. Active and passive tracers were used at Stony Clove at Jansen Rd at Lanesville, NY, to measure bed material displacement associated with storm runoff.


    map background search result map search result map Long-term Monitoring Water Quality in the Catskill Mountains of New York Potential Recovery of Water Chemistry and Stream Biota from Reduced Levels of Acid Deposition at a Sensitive Watershed in the Catskill Mountains, New York Natural Resources of the Neversink River Watershed Mercury concentration in water, sediment, and fish in the Neversink watershed, New York Geomorphology, Biology, & Stability of Catskill Mountain Streams, New York Assessment of Regional Forest Health and Stream and Soil Chemistry Using a Mulit-Scale Approach and New Methods of Remote Sensing Interpretation in the Catskill Mountains of New York An Integrated Assessment of the Recovery of Surface Waters from Reduced Levels of Acid Precipitation in the Catskill and Adirondack Regions, New York An Assessment of Forest Health and Soil Nutrient Status to Determine the Effects of Logging Practices on Water Quality in New York City's West-of-Hudson Watersheds Assessing Spatiotemporal Patterns in Fish Assemblages from Acid-Sensitive Streams in the Adirondack and Catskill Mountains Changes in Soil and Stream Water Chemistry in Response to Reduction in Acid Deposition in the Catskills Data for impacts of introduced Alewife and White Perch on growth of Rainbow Trout in the Ashokan Reservoir, Catskill Mountains, New York Northeastern Hydrologic Benchmark Network (HBN) Soil Chemistry and Catskill Mountain Water-Quality Data Suspended-sediment concentration and turbidity data for sites in the upper Esopus Creek watershed New York, 2016-19 Bed material transport data in the upper Esopus Creek watershed, Ulster and Greene Counties, NY, 2017-2020 Flood-Frequency Data for Select Sites in the Esopus Creek Watershed, New York Data for impacts of introduced Alewife and White Perch on growth of Rainbow Trout in the Ashokan Reservoir, Catskill Mountains, New York Long-term Monitoring Water Quality in the Catskill Mountains of New York Potential Recovery of Water Chemistry and Stream Biota from Reduced Levels of Acid Deposition at a Sensitive Watershed in the Catskill Mountains, New York Natural Resources of the Neversink River Watershed Mercury concentration in water, sediment, and fish in the Neversink watershed, New York An Assessment of Forest Health and Soil Nutrient Status to Determine the Effects of Logging Practices on Water Quality in New York City's West-of-Hudson Watersheds Flood-Frequency Data for Select Sites in the Esopus Creek Watershed, New York Suspended-sediment concentration and turbidity data for sites in the upper Esopus Creek watershed New York, 2016-19 Bed material transport data in the upper Esopus Creek watershed, Ulster and Greene Counties, NY, 2017-2020 Northeastern Hydrologic Benchmark Network (HBN) Soil Chemistry and Catskill Mountain Water-Quality Data Assessing Spatiotemporal Patterns in Fish Assemblages from Acid-Sensitive Streams in the Adirondack and Catskill Mountains Assessment of Regional Forest Health and Stream and Soil Chemistry Using a Mulit-Scale Approach and New Methods of Remote Sensing Interpretation in the Catskill Mountains of New York Changes in Soil and Stream Water Chemistry in Response to Reduction in Acid Deposition in the Catskills Geomorphology, Biology, & Stability of Catskill Mountain Streams, New York An Integrated Assessment of the Recovery of Surface Waters from Reduced Levels of Acid Precipitation in the Catskill and Adirondack Regions, New York