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Partnership - Hawaii Fish Habitat Partnership Anchialine pools represent an inland waterbody type that is widespread but threatened throughout the Hawaiian Islands and is a key habitat type of concern to the Hawaii Fish Habitat Partnership. Anchialine pools, also known as fishponds in Hawaii, are near the coast and are land-locked bodies of water that have connections both to the sea, typically by high tides, as well as to local freshwater. These systems have been used for thousands of years for fish production by Native Hawaiians. The majority of remaining fishpond pools are located on the Kona coast and southern coastlines of the Big Island, the southeast coast of Maui, and on several small and widely separated...
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Partnership - Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership The Harpeth River drains nearly 900 square miles in middle Tennessee and flows through one of the fastest growing regions in the country. It is a state designated Scenic River in Davidson County, within 30 minutes of downtown Nashville. The river is one of the most archeologically and historically significant rivers in the state. However, the project area was listed on the U.S. EPA Section 303(d) list for siltation and habitat alteration, nutrient enrichment and low dissolved oxygen. Low dissolved oxygen was particularly an issue above a 6.2 foot low head dam near Franklin, Tennessee. Dissolved oxygen measurements at this dam were below state standards, and...
Partnership – Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership The Nueces River basin has some of the most pristine streams, creeks, and rivers in Texas. The Nueces River basin supplies approximately two-thirds of the recharge to the Edwards Aquifer, which serves as a drinking water supply for millions of Texans. Since 2007, a riparian invasive plant, Arundo donax (giant reed), has been spreading at a rapid rate. Giant reed forms dense colonies that can grow to more than 20 feet in height and channelize streams, significantly altering instream habitat conditions for native aquatic species. In the early spring of 2010, landowners along the Nueces River began to notice the explosive expansion of Giant reed and large...
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Partnership - Ohio River Basin Fish Habitat Partnership The Ohio River Basin Fish Habitat Partnership (ORBFHP) identified the Eel River in northern Indiana as a priority area based on their science-based modeling process. Two fish, the Greater Redhorse and the Redside Dace, and a number of mussels that are classified as imperiled in Indiana exist in this river. Partnership involvement in this priority watershed has been instrumental in the establishment of critical conservation partnerships with the goal of a holistic approach to watershed ecological integrity in the Eel River. Partners engaged in collaboration conservation of the Eel River watershed include: the Manchester University Environmental Studies...
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Partnership – Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership The Guadalupe Bass ( Micropterus treculii) is the Texas state fish, endemic to central Texas, and an economically important stream sport fish. It is also listed as threatened due to habitat degradation, stream flow alteration, and hybridization with non-native Smallmouth Bass stocked in the 1970’s and 80’s. The headwaters of the Blanco River bubble up from springs near the city of Blanco in the Texas Hill Country. Historically this river was home to a good population of Guadalupe Bass, but recent surveys found only Guadalupe/Smallmouth Bass hybrids. It was thought efforts to remove Smallmouth Bass were impractical. However, in 2011 during the height...
Partnership - Eastern Brook Trout Joint Venture Aaron Run, in western Maryland, was once a home to Brook Trout and many other aquatic animals, but aquatic life has been seriously reduced ever since historic coal mining activities polluted the stream. A portion of the watershed sits over abandoned deep coal mines and there are several hundred acres of reclaimed surface mines in the watershed. Additionally, coal waste piles were dumped along the stream banks. Like many waters in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic United States, acid mine drainage has severely impaired water quality of the creek causing very low pH levels, which in turn precipitated iron into the streambed, causing the creek bed to turn reddish-yellow...
Partnership - Hawaii Fish Habitat Partnership The Waipa Stream flows from lower Mount Waialeale to Hanalei Bay on the north shore of Kauai, Hawaii. Much of the upper Waipa Stream system still exhibits good quality aquatic habitat. However, the lower reaches of Waipa Stream were significantly degraded due to widespread and dense overgrowth of an invasive riparian tree known as hau ( Hibiscus tiliaceus). The in-stream habitat available for native aquatic fish and invertebrates was reduced by hau growth in the stream causing sediment and plant debris to fill up a stretch of the stream channel and creating unnatural barriers for migrating native fish and prawns that have to pass through this section of the stream...
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Partnership - Western Native Trout Initiative The Redband Trout, a group of Rainbow Trout, are remarkable fish. Some live as freshwater fish and some as anadromous fish that occupy both fresh and saltwater habitats during different stages of their lives. The interior Redband Trout is listed as a “Species of Conservation Concern” in most of its range. Its historic range covers eastern Washington and Oregon, northeastern California, central and southwestern Idaho, northwestern Montana, and parts of northern Nevada. Within this broad area, Redband Trout habitat can vary from higher elevation cold-water mountain streams to lower elevation warmer desert-type streams that have periods of low stream flows and high water...
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Partnership - Western Native Trout Initiative Seldom are dams beneficial to fish populations but the Chadbourne Dam is an exception. The Shields River watershed has substantial conservation value for Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout ( Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) because the watershed is the largest basin-level stronghold for Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout populations in Montana. Within the Shield River watershed, sixty-six percent of streams of historically occupied habitat still support Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout. This watershed is at the northern extent of the species’ native range, which also provides an opportunity to conserve Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout where they can be resilient to climate change. The Chadbourne...
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Partnership - Desert Fish Habitat Partnership Shoshone Pupfish are one of the most imperiled species in the Death Valley region due to their natural rarity, historic disruption of their habitats, lack of replication of the one remaining population, and genetic effects of small population size. Shoshone Spring and wetlands have been owned by one family for over 50 years. Endemic Shoshone Pupfish were considered extinct by 1969, but rediscovered in a ditch near the springs in 1986. A single pond was built and stocked with 75 of these fish, believed to be the last of their kind. The purpose of the project was to construct two new additional habitats, one secluded in a mesquite bosque, and one in a landscaped...
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Partnership - Eastern Brook Trout Joint Venture Historically, Nash Stream, New Hampshire was known as a high quality wild Brook Trout stream that provided exceptional angling opportunities. Unfortunately in 1969, the dam used to release water from Nash Bog Pond for log drives failed sending a torrent of water akin to the 500-year flood event down Nash Stream. Immediately thereafter and in response to the dam failure, stretches of Nash Stream were straightened and its banks made higher by bulldozers. Consequently, much of the instream and riparian habitat was altered to the detriment of wild Brook Trout and other fish species. Additionally, undersized culverts were placed in many essential Brook Trout spawning...
Partnership - Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitat Partnership Atlantic Sturgeon ( Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus) spend a majority of their lives in the ocean but depend on freshwater tributaries for spawning and estuaries for rearing. Overfishing and habitat loss has resulted in the disappearance of this fish from a majority of its original range by the early 1900s. A remnant population of Atlantic Sturgeon continued to use the James River in Virginia, but in 2012, the Chesapeake Bay population segment of Atlantic sturgeon was listed as "endangered" under the Endangered Species Act by NOAA Fisheries. A lack of clean, hard substrate was determined to be one of the limiting factors in the James River for Atlantic...
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Partnerships - Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitat Partnership and Eastern Brook Trout Joint Venture The Upper Patten Stream Watershed near Surry, Maine historically supported a thriving commercial Alewife fishery and was used by many other anadromous fish species including Blueback Herring, American Eel, sea-run Brook Trout, and Atlantic Salmon. The Route 172 road crossing caused a four-foot drop without a jumping pool, creating a significant fish movement barrier. The road was the only barrier between Patten Bay and the upper drainage, located just upstream of the estuary. Patten Stream's Alewives were nearly eliminated, surviving mainly due to volunteers who carried fish over the barrier in nets so they may reach...
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Partnership - Great Plains Fish Habitat Partnership Lake Sturgeon were an important protein and cultural resource for Native Americans and a key food resource for early settlers in the Red River basin in the 1800’s and earlier. By the mid-1900’s, this unique species was extirpated from this river system as the result of barrier and dam construction, overharvest, and pollution. In the late 1980’s, a broad coalition started the process of reestablishing this key species back into its native range in the Red River system with a focus on rehabilitating habitat, removing barriers/dams, and re-populating the river using hatchery fish. The Christine and Hickson dams were 2 of 3 remaining mainstem dams that prevented...
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Partnerships - Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership and Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitat Partnership Both the Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership (SARP) and Atlantic Coastal Fish Habitat Partnership (ACFHP) supported marsh restoration/living shoreline projects on the Tolomato River in the Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve (GTMNERR) near St. Augustine, Florida. These projects are located on the southern portion of the Guana Peninsula and are creating a contiguous swath of restored marsh that is: improving and enhancing fish habitat; preventing shoreline erosion; and fostering opportunities for community stewardship and involvement that will provide benefits for years to come. The...
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Partnerships - Desert Fishes Habitat Partnership and Western Native Trout Initiative Bluehead Sucker ( Catostomus discobolus) and Bonneville Cutthroat Trout ( Oncorhynchus clarki utah) have experienced extensive population declines and range reduction, often from habitat fragmentation. In the Weber River, Utah, Bluehead Sucker occurs in three fragmented reaches and the strongest population in the Weber River is confined below the Lower Weber River Diversion structure. Allowing passage around this diversion would provide Bluehead Sucker access to needed canyon habitat. Large fluvial Bonneville Cutthroat Trout have been virtually eliminated from river mainstems throughout this species’ range, but still persists...
Partnership - Western Native Trout Initiative The Gila Trout ( Oncorhynchus gilae) is one of the rarest native trout species in the United States. Gila trout were listed as federally endangered in 1967, and re-classified as threatened in 2006 after efforts to restore populations were successful. Over the past 25 years, 14 wildfires have burned in watersheds occupied by Gila Trout, requiring fish evacuation on multiple occasions, and ten Gila Trout populations have been eliminated, setting back recovery efforts. While previous fires only affected one or two populations of fish, recent fires have become exceedingly large. The 2012 Whitewater-Baldy fire burned over 290,000 acres, encompassing much of the current...
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Partnership - Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership Dams and man-made barriers pose to impeding the movement of fish and blocking fish from their spawning grounds and habitat connectivity is listed as a top priority of the Southeast Aquatic Habitat Plan, the strategic plan of the Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership (SARP). To help address this issue, SARP, together with the Nature Conservancy (TNC) has completed a large scale assessment of dams in the Southeastern United States. The Southeast Aquatic Connectivity Assessment Project ( SEACAP), funded by the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (SALCC), supports planners and managers in their efforts to target fish passage and other aquatic...
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Partnership – Great Lakes Basin Fish Habitat Partnership The nearly 300 square mile Boardman River watershed is located in Grand Traverse and Kalkaska Counties in northwest Michigan. With the exception of the extreme lower river and three impoundments, the Boardman River is an oligotrophic river system with excellent water quality characterized by cold temperatures, high dissolved oxygen concentrations, and nutrients provided by distant inputs. Of the approximately 179 miles of river and tributary streams in the Boardman system, 36 miles are designated as a “Blue Ribbon” trout stream, providing premier fish habitat. Anglers from near and far come to enjoy the predominantly resident Brook and Brown Trout fishery,...
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Partnership - Reservoir Fisheries Habitat Partnership Following the reservoir construction boom of the 1960’s and 1970’s, fisheries biologists recognized an emerging problem with these waters. As aquatic habitats declined within aging reservoirs and impoundments, so did the quality of the fisheries and subsequently fishing participation. Motivation to take action was substantial as reservoirs and impoundments support the majority of recreational public fishing opportunities within the State of Nebraska. Biologists raised awareness of the importance of healthy aquatic habitats and Nebraska anglers strongly supported a legislative initiative to require the purchase of an “Aquatic Habitat Stamp” with their fishing...


map background search result map search result map Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Kiholo Estuary-Fishpond Complex, Hawaii Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Patten Stream Fish Passageway, Maine Fish Habitat Partnerships Making A Difference with Regional Assessments and Decision Support Tools to Guide Fish Passage in the Southeastern United States Eastern Gulf of Mexico States - Tolomato River Coastal Restoration Project, Florida Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference: Interior Redband Trout Range-wide Assessment Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Eel River, Indiana Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in the Death Valley Region Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Nash Stream, New Hampshire Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Boardman River, Michigan Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference Low Dam Removal on the Harpeth River, Tennessee Fish Habitat Partnerships Making A Difference with Regional Assessments and Decision Support Tools to Guide Fish Passage in the Southeastern United States Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Patten Stream Fish Passageway, Maine Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Nash Stream, New Hampshire Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Eel River, Indiana Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference Low Dam Removal on the Harpeth River, Tennessee Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Boardman River, Michigan Eastern Gulf of Mexico States - Tolomato River Coastal Restoration Project, Florida Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in the Death Valley Region Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference: Interior Redband Trout Range-wide Assessment Fish Habitat Partnerships Making a Difference in Kiholo Estuary-Fishpond Complex, Hawaii