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This dataset contains information from visual encounter surveys conducted between 2012 and 2016 by USGS as part of an ongoing Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) monitoring effort in the Oregon Cascade Mountain Range. We surveyed 91 sites using a rotating frame design in the Klamath and Deschutes Basins, Oregon, which encompass most of the species' core extant range. Data consist of spotted frog counts aggregated by date, location, and life stage, as well as data on environmental conditions at the time of each survey.
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This data release provides access to a low-altitude aeromagnetic survey flown over a part of the Cascade Range of the US Pacific Northwest, approximately centered over the town of Cascade Locks, Oregon. The Cascade Locks magnetic survey encompasses two large stratovolcanoes of the Cascade Range: Mt. Hood (3426 m) in Oregon and Mt. Adams (3742 m) in Washington. Data were acquired between October 17, 2021, and February 26, 2022, by KBM Resources Group, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, working under contract to the U.S. Geological Survey. The survey is underlain by a diverse magnetic terrane, including Miocene flood basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group and Tertiary to Quaternary volcanic and intrusive rocks of the...
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Forests in Washington State generate substantial economic revenue from commercial timber harvesting on private lands. To investigate the rates, causes, and spatial and temporal patterns of forest harvest on private tracts throughout the central Cascade Mountain area, we relied on a new generation of annual land-use/land-cover (LULC) products created from the application of the Continuous Change Detection and Classification (CCDC) algorithm to Landsat satellite imagery collected from 1985 to 2014. We calculated metrics of landscape pattern using patches of intact and harvested forest patches identified in each annual layer to identify changes throughout the time series. Patch dynamics revealed four distinct eras...
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The catastrophic, explosive eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, on May 18, 1980, is the most well-known eruption of the volcano. Less well known is the May 18th eruption marked the beginning of a period of eruptive activity that lasted through 1986. From October 1980 through October 1986, a series of 17 dome-building episodes added millions of cubic meters of lava to the crater floor. Most of the growth occurred when magma extruded onto the surface of the dome, forming short (650 to 1,300 feet), thick (65 to 130 feet) lava flows. This data release is a 1-meter resolution digital elevation model (DEM) and a corresponding hillshade raster derived from a previously unpublished 1:2,000 scale topographic contour...
Abstract (from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015WR017873/abstract): Spatially distributed snow depth and snow duration data were collected over two to four snow seasons during water years 2011–2014 in experimental forest plots within the Cedar River Municipal Watershed, 50 km east of Seattle, Washington, USA. These 40 × 40 m forest plots, situated on the western slope of the Cascade Range, include unthinned second-growth coniferous forests, variable density thinned forests, forest gaps in which a 20 m diameter (approximately equivalent to one tree height) gap was cut in the middle of each plot, and old-growth forest. Together, this publicly available data set includes snow depth and density observations...
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This dataset contains information from visual encounter surveys conducted between 2012 and 2016 by USGS as part of an ongoing Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) monitoring effort in the Oregon Cascade Mountain Range. We surveyed 91 sites using a rotating frame design in the Klamath and Deschutes Basins, Oregon, which encompass most of the species' core extant range. Data consist of spotted frog counts aggregated by date, location, and life stage, as well as data on environmental conditions at the time of each survey.
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The dataset consists of chemical analyses and some isotopic analyses of rock samples collected from Mount Shasta, California, and its immediate surroundings.
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Forests in Washington State generate substantial economic revenue from commercial timber harvesting on private lands. To investigate the rates, causes, and spatial and temporal patterns of forest harvest on private tracts throughout the central Cascade Mountain area, we relied on a new generation of annual land-use/land-cover (LULC) products created from the application of the Continuous Change Detection and Classification (CCDC) algorithm to Landsat satellite imagery collected from 1985 to 2014. We calculated metrics of landscape pattern using patches of intact and harvested forest patches identified in each annual layer to identify changes throughout the time series. Patch dynamics revealed four distinct eras...
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This dataset contains information from surveys conducted 2010-2018 by USGS as part of a long-term Oregon spotted frog monitoring effort in the central Oregon range. Data consist of site, survey, habitat, and species detection covariates, as well as inter-site distance measurements.
The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980-1986 and 2004-2008. During 2017, U.S. Forest Service contracted the acquisitions of airborne lidar surveys of Mount St. Helens and upper North Fork Toutle River basin, part of a larger 2017-2018 survey of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The U.S. Geological Survey combined and reprojected 81 raster datasets, provided by the U.S. Forest Service in October 2018, into a single digital elevation model (DEM) of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover (that is, 'bare earth')....
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On May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens, Washington, exploded in a spectacular and devastating eruption that resulted in previously unimaginable events that drastically altered the mountain and the surrounding area. One unprecedented event was the collapse of the summit and north flank of the volcano forming a huge landslide known as the ‘debris avalanche’ with a total volume of about 2.5 km3 (3.3 billion cubic yards). The debris avalanche swept around and up ridges to the north, but most of it turned westward as far as 23 km (14 mi) down the valley of the North Fork Toutle River and formed a hummocky deposit. This had a profound effect on the topography of the area, including transforming the summit cone of the volcano...
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This dataset contains information from capture-mark-recapture sampling of Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) conducted 2016-2019 by USGS as part of a study relating R. pretiosa survival and abundance to wetland inundation in the upper Deschutes River. Data consist of site, survey, habitat, and species detection covariates, as well as 10 years of hydrological and drought metrics used to establish relationships between river flow and area of inundation at survey sites. Remotely sensed and model predicted area wet estimates for the sites are also given.
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The catastrophic, explosive eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, on May 18, 1980, is the most well-known eruption of the volcano. Less well known is the May 18th eruption marked the beginning of a period of eruptive activity that lasted through 1986. From October 1980 through October 1986, a series of 17 dome-building episodes added millions of cubic meters of lava to the crater floor. Most of the growth occurred when magma extruded onto the surface of the dome, forming short (650 to 1,300 feet), thick (65 to 130 feet) lava flows. This data release is a 2-meter resolution digital elevation model (DEM) and hillshade raster derived from a previously unpublished 1:4,000 scale topographic contour map, based on...
Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range includes the heat discharged by thermal springs, by “slightly thermal” springs that are only a few degrees warmer than ambient temperature, and by fumaroles. Thermal-spring heat discharge is calculated on the basis of chloride-flux measurements and geothermometer temperatures and totals ~ 240 MW in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, excluding the transient post-1980 discharge at Mount St. Helens (~ 80 MW as of 2004–5). Heat discharge from “slightly thermal” springs is based on the degree of geothermal warming (after correction for gravitational potential energy effects) and totals ~ 660 MW. Fumarolic heat discharge is calculated by a variety of indirect and direct...
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Panorama of Cascade Range from north to southwest, from summit of Mount Hawkins, geologist sitting at right. Snoqualmie quadrangle, Kittitas County, Washington. Photograph on page 21 , Images of the U.S. Geological Survey, 1879-1979.
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Forests in Washington State generate substantial economic revenue from commercial timber harvesting on private lands. To investigate the rates, causes, and spatial and temporal patterns of forest harvest on private tracts throughout the central Cascade Mountain area, we relied on a new generation of annual land-use/land-cover (LULC) products created from the application of the Continuous Change Detection and Classification (CCDC) algorithm to Landsat satellite imagery collected from 1985 to 2014. We calculated metrics of landscape pattern using patches of intact and harvested forest patches identified in each annual layer to identify changes throughout the time series. Patch dynamics revealed four distinct eras...
This study quantifies the cycling of halogen elements through the Cascadia subduction zone based on the chemistry of thermal springs in the Central Oregon Cascade Range and of a mineral spring in the forearc (Willamette Valley). Considerations based on mass balances, element ratios, and 36Cl/Cl and 129I/I ratios suggest that halogens discharged through the thermal springs in the Cascade Range are probably derived from magma degassing. Our results indicate that < 35% of the subducted Cl and < 20% of the subducted Br and I could be transported through arc volcanism and the thermal springs, a considerably lower percentage than estimated for other volcanic arcs along the Pacific Rim. A likely explanation for this difference...
Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range includes the heat discharged by thermal springs, by “slightly thermal” springs that are only a few degrees warmer than ambient temperature, and by fumaroles. Thermal-spring heat discharge is calculated on the basis of chloride-flux measurements and geothermometer temperatures and totals ~ 240 MW in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, excluding the transient post-1980 discharge at Mount St. Helens (~ 80 MW as of 2004–5). Heat discharge from “slightly thermal” springs is based on the degree of geothermal warming (after correction for gravitational potential energy effects) and totals ~ 660 MW. Fumarolic heat discharge is calculated by a variety of indirect and direct...
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The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. The eruption produced mudflows in the South Fork Toutle River basin, which drains the western slopes of the volcano. Orthophotography was acquired shortly after the eruption (June 19 and July 1). Survey extent includes South Fork Toutle River, from its headwaters at Talas and Toutle Glaciers to its mouth at the confluence with North Fork Toutle River near Toutle, Washington. In 2004, Photo Sciences, Inc., under contract to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), used softcopy photogrammetry techniques to produce a contour map, breaklines, and masspoints. A USGS...


map background search result map search result map Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) Monitoring in the Oregon Cascades Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) Monitoring in the Oregon Cascades 2012-2016 Chemical and isotopic analyses of Mount Shasta, California Data - Forest harvest patterns on private lands in the Cascade Mountains, Washington, USA Logistic Regression Samples - Forest harvest patterns on private lands in the Cascade Mountains, Washington, USA Patch Statistics - Forest harvest patterns on private lands in the Cascade Mountains, Washington, USA High-resolution digital elevation model of Mount St. Helens and upper North Fork Toutle River basin, based on airborne lidar surveys of July-September, 2017 Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) monitoring data for metademographic analysis 2010-2018, Oregon Mount St. Helens. Cascade Range. n.d. Capture-mark-recapture data for Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) along the Deschutes River, Oregon, 2016-2019 Digital elevation model of South Fork Toutle River, Mount St. Helens, based on June–July 1980 airborne photogrammetry Digital elevation model of Mount St. Helens, Washington and vicinity prior to the 1980 eruption Digital elevation model of the lava dome in the crater of Mount St. Helens, November 12, 1986 High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey Over Cascade Locks, Oregon, and Surrounding Areas Digital elevation model of the lava dome in the crater of Mount St. Helens on October 20, 1988 Digital elevation model of the lava dome in the crater of Mount St. Helens, November 12, 1986 Digital elevation model of the lava dome in the crater of Mount St. Helens on October 20, 1988 High-resolution digital elevation model of Mount St. Helens and upper North Fork Toutle River basin, based on airborne lidar surveys of July-September, 2017 Capture-mark-recapture data for Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) along the Deschutes River, Oregon, 2016-2019 Digital elevation model of Mount St. Helens, Washington and vicinity prior to the 1980 eruption Digital elevation model of South Fork Toutle River, Mount St. Helens, based on June–July 1980 airborne photogrammetry Chemical and isotopic analyses of Mount Shasta, California High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey Over Cascade Locks, Oregon, and Surrounding Areas Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) Monitoring in the Oregon Cascades Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) Monitoring in the Oregon Cascades 2012-2016 Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) monitoring data for metademographic analysis 2010-2018, Oregon Data - Forest harvest patterns on private lands in the Cascade Mountains, Washington, USA Logistic Regression Samples - Forest harvest patterns on private lands in the Cascade Mountains, Washington, USA Patch Statistics - Forest harvest patterns on private lands in the Cascade Mountains, Washington, USA Mount St. Helens. Cascade Range. n.d.