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This composite shaded relief image dataset depicts generalized bathymetry and topography of the Caribbean region.
Categories: Data, pre-SM502.8; Tags: AG, AI, AN, AW, Anguilla, All tags...
The Caribbean region is part of World Energy Assessment region 6 (Central and South America). A fundamental task in the assessment is to map the locations and type of production for existing oil and gas fields. The Petroconsultants database is the only available database that has coverage for the Caribbean region. Oil and gas field symbols represent field center-points and are published with permission from Petroconsultants International Data Corporation, 2002 database.
Categories: Data, pre-SM502.8; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: AG, AI, AN, AW, Anguilla, All tags...
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This dataset contains topographic (horizontal and vertical) data for 20 sites, surveyed November 6 to November 28, 2017 as part of documentation of flooding that occurred in Puerto Rico during and after Hurricane Maria (September to November 2017). Hurricane Maria hit the Island of Puerto Rico on September 20, 2017 and was one of the deadliest storms in U.S. history. USGS personnel conducted topographic surveys at selected stream sites to facilitate hydraulic modeling of peak streamflows (or discharges) – termed indirect measurements – using published standard USGS methods. Indirect (post-flood) measurements are used to characterize flood peaks that could not be determined using direct methods (for example current-velocity...
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This inventory was originally created by Harp and others (2016) describing the landslides triggered by the M 7.0 Haiti earthquake that occurred on 12 January 2010 at 21:53:10 UTC. Care should be taken when comparing with other inventories because different authors use different mapping techniques. This inventory also could be associated with other earthquakes such as aftershocks or triggered events. Please check the author methods summary and the original data source for more information on these details and to confirm the viability of this inventory for your specific use. With the exception of the data from USGS sources, the inventory data and associated metadata were not acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey...
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Fish collections made at Buck Island Reef National Monument with the ichthyocide rotenone in 2001 at 58 stations followed by 10 days each in April 2011 and January 2012 surveying poorly sampled shoreline habitats with rotenone and clove oil and inland streams with seine. Attached files: Original metadata created at the Southeast Ecological Science Center - Jelks_St_Croix_2001-2012.xml Original dataset provided by M. Cannister - Jelks_St_Croix_2001-2012_orig.csv Enrollment journal used to crosswalk the original data into MBG format - OBIS-USA Enrollment Journal Virgin Islands Jelks 20140626.doc Final MBG version of the data after processing - USGS_StCroix_MarineFishesMBG_20140702.csv Intermediate file created by...
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Freshwater fish are among the most vulnerable taxa to climate change globally but are generally understudied in tropical island ecosystems. Climate change is predicted to alter the intensity, frequency, and variability of extreme flow events on the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico. These changes may impact Caribbean native and non-native stream ecosystems and biota complex ways. We compiled an extensive dataset of native and non-native fish assemblages collected at 119 sites across Puerto Rico from 2005 to 2015. We coupled these data with stream flow indices and dam height to understand how flow dynamics drive fish assemblage structure. Sixteen percent of sites contained exclusively non-native species, 34% contained...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains shoreline positions for the United States coasts from both older sources, such as aerial photographs or topographic surveys, and contemporary sources, such as lidar-point clouds and digital elevation models. These shorelines are compiled and analyzed in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System software to compute their rates of change. Keeping a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor change over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release, and other associated products, represent...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains shoreline positions for the United States coasts from both older sources, such as aerial photographs or topographic surveys, and contemporary sources, such as lidar-point clouds and digital elevation models. These shorelines are compiled and analyzed in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System software to compute their rates of change. Keeping a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor change over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release, and other associated products, represent...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains shoreline positions for the United States coasts from both older sources, such as aerial photos or topographic surveys, as well as contemporary sources like lidar point clouds and digital elevation models (DEMs). These shorelines are compiled and analyzed in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) software to compute rates of change. It is useful to keep a record of historical shoreline positions as a method of monitoring change over time to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release and other associated products represent an expansion...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains shoreline positions for the United States coasts from both older sources, such as aerial photos or topographic surveys, as well as contemporary sources like lidar point clouds and digital elevation models (DEMs). These shorelines are compiled and analyzed in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) software to compute rates of change. It is useful to keep a record of historical shoreline positions as a method of monitoring change over time to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release and other associated products represent an expansion...
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Red lionfish (Pterois volitans) have become a successful invasive predator across the Northwestern Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico (GoM). Previous investigations have identified the southeast coast of Florida as the original site of introduction, but no region-wide genetic study has directly addressed the question of introduction location(s). This dataset includes previously unpublished red lionfish samples (n = 237) from six locations: The Bahamas, Florida Keys, Northwest Florida, North Carolina, Panama, and Southeast Florida. Sequences archived in NCBI from other locations in the Northern Region, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico basins were used in the analyses (N = 1558). Previously published sequences were...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains shoreline positions for the United States coasts from both older sources, such as aerial photographs or topographic surveys, and contemporary sources, such as lidar-point clouds and digital elevation models. These shorelines are compiled and analyzed in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System software to compute their rates of change. Keeping a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor change over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release, and other associated products, represent...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains shoreline positions for the United States' coasts from both older sources, such as aerial photographs or topographic surveys, and contemporary sources, such as lidar-point clouds and digital elevation models. These shorelines are compiled and analyzed in the USGS Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS), version 5.1 software to calculate rates of change. Keeping a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor change over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release, and other associated...
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This dataset includes a modified subset of polygon features that describe U.S. Geological Survey's defined geologic provinces of the World. Each province has a set of geologic characteristics that distinguish it from surrounding provinces. These characteristics may include dominant lithologies, the age of the strata, and/or structural type. Each province is assigned a unique numeric code and may fall within two or more countries or assessment regions.
Categories: Data, pre-SM502.8; Types: Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: AG, AI, AN, AW, Anguilla, All tags...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains shoreline positions for the United States coasts from both older sources, such as aerial photographs or topographic surveys, and contemporary sources, such as lidar-point clouds and digital elevation models. These shorelines are compiled and analyzed in the USGS Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS), version 5.1 software to calculate rates of change. Keeping a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor change over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release, and other associated...
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This dataset is from expert elicitation of a panel of 15 experts with knowledge of stony coral tissue loss disease (SCTLD) and its impacts on coral reefs. We gathered this group of 15 participants with diverse expertise who had previously studied SCTLD including at universities and various government agencies as microbiologists, pathologists, disease ecologists, population ecologists, and coral experts. Participants represented marine disease experts in Florida, Hawaii, South Carolina, and the US Virgin Islands. We then used a rapid prototyping approach (Runge and Converse, 2017) to elicit, structure, and evaluate existing knowledge regarding the etiology of SCTLD. Our approach began with eliciting hypotheses about...
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The North American distribution of Najas marina L. from 1863 to 2020 is presented in this dataset. Fields provided include georeferenced coordinates, dates of collections, collectors, and source herbaria. Data are housed in the U.S. Geological Survey's Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database (nas.er.usgs.gov).
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains shoreline positions for the United States coasts from both older sources, such as aerial photographs or topographic surveys, and contemporary sources, such as lidar-point clouds and digital elevation models. These shorelines are compiled and analyzed in the USGS Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS), version 5.1 software to calculate rates of change. Keeping a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor change over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release, and other associated...
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Recent investigations of demersal fish communities in deep (less than 50 m) rugged habitats have considerably increased our knowledge of the factors that influence the assemblage structure of fishes across mesophotic to deep-sea depths. Although habitat types influence deepwater fish distribution, whether different rugged seafloor features provide functionally equivalent habitat for fishes is poorly understood. In the northeastern Caribbean, numerous rugged seafloor features (e.g., seamounts, banks, canyons) punctuate insular margins, and thus create a remarkable setting in which to examine demersal fish communities across various seafloor features. Also in this region, several water masses are vertically layered...
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This sampling frame is a set of grid-based, finite-area frames spanning the offshore areas surrounding Canada, the United States, and Mexico, and is intended for use with the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat). A Generalized Random-Tessellation Stratified (GRTS) Survey Design draw was added to the sample units from the raw sampling grids (https://doi.org/10.5066/P9XBOCVV). The GRTS survey design algorithm assigns a spatially balanced and randomized ordering (GRTS order) to each cell within its respective framework. Grid cells are prioritized numerically; the lower the number, the higher the sampling priority. Cells can then be selected for monitoring following the GRTS order, ensuring both randomization...


map background search result map search result map USGS Marine Fishes of St. Croix and U.S. Virgin Islands Harp and others (2016) Demersal fish assemblages on seamounts and other rugged features in the northeastern Caribbean Red Lionfish DNA data collected from Florida, USA and around the invasive distribution from 2007 to 2016 Specimen observation data for Najas marina L. from 1863 to 2020 Oil and Gas Fields of the Caribbean Region, 2004 (fld6bg) Geologic Provinces of the Caribbean Region, 2004 (prv6bg) Shaded Relief Image of the Caribbean Region (shadedrelief.jpg) Spatial and elevation points surveyed for indirect measurements of peak streamflow associated with flooding of September to November 2017 in Puerto Rico 2010 Shorelines for Vieques, Culebra, and Main Island of Puerto Rico Puerto Rico shoreline change: A GIS compilation of shorelines, baselines, intersects, and change rates calculated using the digital shoreline analysis system version 5.1 (ver. 2.0, March 2023) 2015 Mean High Water Shorelines of the Puerto Rico Coast used in Shoreline Change Analysis 2016 NOAA Mean High Water Shorelines of the Puerto Rico coast used in Shoreline Change Analysis 1970s Shorelines for Vieques and Culebra, Puerto Rico Baseline for the coast of Puerto Rico's main island generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 (ver. 2.0, March 2023) Baseline for the islands of of Vieques and Culebra, Puerto Rico, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 The Effects of Flow Extremes on Native and Non-Native Stream Fishes in Puerto Rico Baseline for the islands of of Vieques and Culebra, Puerto Rico, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 1970s Shorelines for Vieques and Culebra, Puerto Rico Harp and others (2016) 2016 NOAA Mean High Water Shorelines of the Puerto Rico coast used in Shoreline Change Analysis 2015 Mean High Water Shorelines of the Puerto Rico Coast used in Shoreline Change Analysis Puerto Rico shoreline change: A GIS compilation of shorelines, baselines, intersects, and change rates calculated using the digital shoreline analysis system version 5.1 (ver. 2.0, March 2023) Baseline for the coast of Puerto Rico's main island generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 (ver. 2.0, March 2023) The Effects of Flow Extremes on Native and Non-Native Stream Fishes in Puerto Rico 2010 Shorelines for Vieques, Culebra, and Main Island of Puerto Rico Spatial and elevation points surveyed for indirect measurements of peak streamflow associated with flooding of September to November 2017 in Puerto Rico Demersal fish assemblages on seamounts and other rugged features in the northeastern Caribbean Oil and Gas Fields of the Caribbean Region, 2004 (fld6bg) Shaded Relief Image of the Caribbean Region (shadedrelief.jpg) Geologic Provinces of the Caribbean Region, 2004 (prv6bg) Red Lionfish DNA data collected from Florida, USA and around the invasive distribution from 2007 to 2016 Specimen observation data for Najas marina L. from 1863 to 2020