Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: Canadian Rockies (X)

9 results (62ms)   

Filters
Date Range
Extensions
Types
Contacts
Categories
Tag Types
Tag Schemes
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
Conclusions:This report sets out guidelines intended to provide BCEAG member jurisdictions with a coordinated approach to recommendations regarding the management of human use activities within wildlife corridors and habitat patches in the Bow Valley of Alberta. The guidelines provide an advisory framework for decision making related to wildlife management as well as recommendations for mitigating the negative effects of human activity on wildlife in the region.Thresholds/Learnings:Male and female cougars avoided areas of high human use and where human use levels exceeded 250-500 users per month.
thumbnail
Conservation Area Name = portfolio sites selected by automation (the SITES algorithm) and expert input The Canadian Rocky Mountains ecoregion (CRM) covers approximately 27.1 million hectares (66.9 million acres) extending across three states and two provinces. The ecoregion extends over a large portion of the Rocky Mountains from southeastern British Columbia and southwestern Alberta to northern Idaho, northwestern Montana and a small part of northeastern Washington. Elevation ranges from 915 m to 3,954 m (3,000 ft to 12,972 ft), with Mt. Robson (BC) being the highest peak in the ecoregion. Geologically, this ecoregion is very complex, containing bedrock of sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic origin; and is largely...
Conclusions:Adult mortality appeared to be largely the result of predation, with cougars accounting for half of the known-cause mortalities. The much higher rate of mortality observed in the more developed portion of the study area supports a link between predation and forestry development.Thresholds/Learnings:
We will develop an approach to identify fire refugia in Rocky Mountain ecosystems of the U.S. and Canada then test the function of refugia for biodiversity conservation under current and future climate/fire scenarios. Our products will be designed to inform decision-making in land/easement acquisition, identification of critical areas for maintaining landscape and process connectivity/permeability, and extension of the temporal context for spatial conservation decision making. The approach will be testable for transferability to other locations and ecosystems.FY2013Objectives:The proposed project will provide a science application for focused resource conservation by developing and testing the concept of refugia...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Alberta, British Columbia, Canada Lynx, Canadian Rockies, Canadian Rockies Greater Ecosystem, All tags...
thumbnail
Conclusions: Grizzly bear population fragmentation corresponded to the presence of settled mountain valleys and major highways. In these disturbed areas, the inter-area movements of female bears was affected more than for male bears. Without female connectivity, small subpopulations of grizzly bears are not viable over the long term. Thresholds/Learnings: Females grizzlies reduced their movement rates drastically when settlement increased to >20% of a given area. In highly settled areas (>50% settlement), both sexes demonstrated similar reductions in movement. Synopsis: Researchers studied the current state and potential causes of population fragmentation in grizzly bears over western Canada, the Greater Yellowstone...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Alberta, British Columbia, Canadian Rockies, Chilcotin Ranges and Fraser Plateau, Clear Hills and Western Alberta Upland, All tags...
thumbnail
Synopsis: This study examined the spatial patterns and factors influencing small terrestrial vertebrate road-kill aggregations in the Bow River Valley of Alberta, Canada. Mammal and bird road-kill indices were consistently higher on low volume parkway roads than on the high-speed, high volume Trans-Canada highway (TCH). Birds were more vulnerable to collisions than mammals on the TCH. Low volume parkway road-kills were less likely to occur on raised sections of road, and tended to occur close to vegetative cover far from wildlife passages and culverts. Highway sections with forested medians were less significant barriers to forest birds than open grassy medians. Since forest dwelling birds are reluctant to cross...
thumbnail
Synopsis: The objective of this study was to examine initial effects of the 2003 Lost Creek wildfire (southwestern Rocky Mountains of Alberta) on concentrations and production (yield and total export) of several nitrogen (N) forms, and to explore initial recovery of these effects within the first 3 years after the fire. During the first postfire year, nitrate (NO3–), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations in severely burned watershed streams were 6.5, 4.1, and 5.3 times greater, respectively, than those in reference streams. Weaker effects were evident for concentrations of ammonium (NH4+; 1.5 times) and total particulate nitrogen (TPN; 3.0 times). A rapid decline in mean watershed...
thumbnail
Synopsis: Large scale natural disturbances from wildfire and severe insect infestations can significantly impact water quality downstream of forested headwaters. Forest fires impact water quality due to sediment input of the ash and soot and by chemical changes to surface and groundwater. This has recently been extensively studied in southwestern Alberta, after the “Lost Creek” wildfire of 2003. Four years of comprehensive hydrology and water quality data from seven watersheds were evaluated and synthesized to assess the implications of wildfire and post-fire intervention (salvage logging) on downstream drinking water treatment. Burned and unburned reference watersheds were examined by the authors. Far more contaminants...
Conclusions:Random camping and off-highway vehicles have impacted water quality in the Ghost-Waiparous basin of Alberta. Sediment loading coefficients in the lower regions of the Waiparous and Ghost rivers were much greater than would be expected in rivers draining a similar forested environment in the upper foothills of southern Alberta and were even greater than loading coefficients in streams draining agricultural lands at lower elevations where sediment erosion is a common problem.Thresholds/Learnings:


    map background search result map search result map Identification of Fire Refugia in Rocky Mountain Ecosystems of the U.S. and Canada: Development and Application of the Refugium Concept for Biodiversity Conservation over Large Spatial and Temporal Scales Implications of land disturbance on drinking water treatability in a changing climate: Demonstrating the need for source water supply and protection strategies. Population fragmentation and inter-ecosystem movements of grizzly bears in western Canada and the northern United States. Wildfire Impacts on nitrogen concentration and production from headwater streams in southern Alberta's Rocky Mountains. Spatial patterns and factors influencing small vertebrate fauna road-kill aggregations. Terrestrial and Freshwater Portfolio: Canadian Rocky Mountains Ecoregional Conservation Assessment Wildfire Impacts on nitrogen concentration and production from headwater streams in southern Alberta's Rocky Mountains. Implications of land disturbance on drinking water treatability in a changing climate: Demonstrating the need for source water supply and protection strategies. Identification of Fire Refugia in Rocky Mountain Ecosystems of the U.S. and Canada: Development and Application of the Refugium Concept for Biodiversity Conservation over Large Spatial and Temporal Scales Spatial patterns and factors influencing small vertebrate fauna road-kill aggregations. Terrestrial and Freshwater Portfolio: Canadian Rocky Mountains Ecoregional Conservation Assessment Population fragmentation and inter-ecosystem movements of grizzly bears in western Canada and the northern United States.