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This project used the NatureServe Climate Change Vulnerability Index tool to assess vulnerability of 140 bird species that breed in the Sierra Nevada and will develop a peer-reviewed Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for Sierra Nevada bird species that are most vulnerable to climate change. The Strategy provides recommendations for actions that managers can take now and in the future to bolster resilience to climate change.
The project objective is to transfer to California a previously developed prioritization framework that combines intraspecific genetic and morphological variation with traditionally used indices of biodiversity, and test its general utility for conservation prioritization. This project will integrate existing data on intraspecific variation of multiple species in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreational Area with climate data and space-borne measurements of the environment to identify areas with high intraspecific variation.
Most natural resource managers, planners and policy makers are now dependent upon spatially explicit environmental suitability and spatial allocation analyses to inform policy and management decisions. However, staff across agencies has been unable to stay current on understanding and applying these new data, tools and analyses. Currently, this information may be underutilized or used inappropriately, which could result in poor decisions. Two training curricula were developed – one for managers and one for GIS analysts – on current best practices for developing and using spatial information to support conservation decision making. The training materials are open-source and widely distributed to California LCC stakeholders.
Phase 1 (2013): The Northern California Coastal Forest ecoregion is dominated by coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) covering 13,300 km2 from just north of the California-Oregon border to Santa Cruz County, California, extending ~60 km inland. This project will synthesize available science on redwood climate resilience strategies at a workshop and related field trip involving the National Park Service, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, California Department of Fish & Wildlife, private landowners, scientists and non-governmental organizations. The resultant comprehensive strategies will help managers prepare coast redwoods for climate change and land-use stressors.
The North-central California coast and ocean is a globally significant, extraordinarily diverse and productive marine and coastal ecosystem that is home to abundant wildlife, valuable fisheries, two national marine sanctuaries, two national parks, and a national wildlife refuge. It is a treasured resource of the San Francisco Bay Area’s seven million residents that rely on this unique marine ecosystem for their livelihoods and recreation. Significant coastal areas, including Tomales Bay, Bolinas Lagoon, Estero Americano, and Estero de San Antonio, support a diversity of habitats, including eelgrass beds, intertidal sand and mud flats, and salt and freshwater marshes that provide numerous ecosystem services such...
This project will build on a nascent Landscape Connectivity Network facilitated by Pepperwood and comprised of land trusts, parks and open space districts, with state and federal land managers. In partnership with UC Berkeley, the network will build a place-based decision support platform for prioritizing and implementing habitat connectivity projects on the ground across multiple jurisdictions. The product will be a science-based prioritization of critical habitat pinch-points co-created with local land managers that identifies threatened linkages in high value habitat corridors. Specific products generated will include a region-wide prioritization of threatened linkages complemented by linkage-specific portfolio...
The California Landscape Conservation Cooperative has offered numerous webinars and workshops over the years to deliver science and support to resource managers in California. This metadata collection describes some of the highlights.
This project developed a foundation for monitoring environmental change by identifying where and what to monitor in order to evaluate climate-change impacts. Phase 1 focused on landbirds, however a framework will be developed that recommends standardized monitoring for other taxa and environmental attributes. Phase II Deliverables produced as part of this proposed work include a Business Plan that 1) refines site selection by developing a decision model in combination with analyses of sites (or clusters of sites) arrayed by climate space, 2) works with the LCC science committee, Joint Ventures, and other partners to choose a manageable number of core monitoring variables, 3) develops and/or adopting existing protocols...
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This dataset is based on the output from a project funded by the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative: “Decision support for climate change adaptation and fire management strategies for at risk species in southern California”. The potential distribution of Ceanothus verrucosus was modeled using a MaxEnt species distribution model using recent and future climate data with presence records from the San Diego Natural History Museum. Species distributions were modeled only for the South Coast Ecoregion in California, USA as this is where management options and climate change adaptation possibilities are currently being examined for the species. Recent climate data were based on the Parameter-Elevation Regressions...
Goal: Identify actions that will maximize the adaptive capacity of priority species, habitat, and ecosystems to support an ecologically connected Central Valley landscape. The CA LCC will bring partners together to cooperatively agree on strategic climate-smart adaptation goals, objectives, strategies, and actions for the Central Valley landscape. The project area is the Central Valley due to its high vulnerability to numerous stressors including continuing land use changes, increasing temperatures, drought, and loss of important habitats. The target audience is natural resource managers and decision makers in the Central Valley. The approach includes assessing current and potential future conditions of priority...
In its first funded year this project created an online environment in which land managers and their technical support staff can quickly find the climate adaptation information they need and communicate with the researchers producing the data. Phase 2 of the project focused on reaching out to the user community to get them engaged in the Climate Commons, and continuing development of the site. In year 3 and beyond, the Climate Commons became the CA LCC’s project data management platform as well as a digital library offering a starting place to find climate change science relevant to conservation decision-making. http://climate.calcommons.org.
Categories: Data, Project; Tags: 2011, 2012, Academics & scientific researchers, Applications and Tools, CA, All tags...
California’s native fishes are mostly endemic, with no place to go as climate change increases water temperatures and alters stream flows. Many of the alien fishes, however, are likely to benefit from the effects of climate change. The goal of this project is to synthesize life history traits, population trends, status, and threats, including climate change, for all fishes in the state. We have found that 25% of the endemic fishes are now in danger of extinction. Climate change in conjunction with alien species, agriculture, and dams pose the greatest threat to native fishes. Preliminary results from two regional analyses suggest that native fishes in the Sierra Nevada are slightly less (74%) vulnerable to climate...
The California Invasive Plant Council (Cal-IPC) developed a “risk mapping” approach that combines comprehensive distribution maps with maps of current and future suitable range to show where each (invasive) species is likely to spread. The distribution maps are based on a new dataset created through a major campaign to collect expert opinion data from local resource managers across the state. From this dataset, Cal-IPC recently completed risk maps and management recommendations for 43 invasive plant species in the Sierra Nevada. The proposed project will build an online tool for these data. The tool will allow natural resource managers to generate risk maps and summary statistics for areas they select, and to determine...
Categories: Data, Project; Tags: 2010, 2012, 2013, Applications and Tools, CA, All tags...
The CA LCC’s Data managers worked with the LCC National Office and the 22 LCCs of the Network to create a single national source for information to date on all projects funded by all 22 individual LCCs and the national office, and a tool for reviewing these projects, for purposes of national-level management and presenting summaries of this information to Congress. Project descriptions were collected in standardized metadata records using controlled vocabularies, and presented in an online database with searching capabilities. The original data call was in 2013 and the database was updated in 2014. This work was a precurser to the development by the DMWG of a more automated metadata publishing system using the Arctic...
This project brought together natural resource managers, conservation coordinators and planners, and scientists working at multiple scales within the San Francisco Bay to develop a spatially-explicit decision framework that cuts across jurisdictional boundaries while accounting for uncertainties about climate change. In particular, the SDM framework allows managers within the Bay to identify a recommended strategy among a set of alternative strategies that may vary among its subregions (e.g. North Bay, South Bay, East Bay). Management priorities will be those that yield the greatest expected conservation benefits across the Bay considering multiple objectives including endangered species recovery (e.g. California...
This project helps the Central Valley Joint Venture (CVJV) track gains and losses of key bird and waterfowl habitats at a landscape scale. This will allow the CVJV to effectively monitor and evaluate habitats essential to conservation planning for wildlife species. This work is important for identifying, assembling, and analyzing data for key habitats of concern and will provide a foundation for future monitoring.
Project Goal The goal of this project is two-fold: 1) to increase the understanding of how meadow restoration impacts hydrology and 2) to inform management and investment decisions around using restoration as a tool to build resilience under climate change. Objectives in support of this goal include: - Complete data collection and analysis and publish peer-reviewed research article on the results of groundwater and surface water measurements before and after restoration in Indian Valley Meadow (Eldorado National Forest) - Double the published scientific literature on the water supply benefits of meadow restoration and produce the first empirical study - Estimate groundwater and base flow (late season groundwater...
This project researched the expected variation in avian demographic responses to environmental change across a gradient of species and landscapes from the San Francisco Bay to the Central Valley of California. We used two avian taxa, waterfowl and songbirds, as case studies for the integration of long-term demographic data with climate change variables. For each taxon, we assessed and synthesized several demographic responses to climate change variables (i.e., precipitation and temperature) to explore the relationship between four large-scale climate indices and bird species arrival dates and nest survival. A web-based application provides natural resource managers with project results.
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The Mediterranean climate region of southern and coastal California is a globallyrecognized biodiversity hotspot, in addition its natural landscapes provide a suite of ecosystemservices including water provision to the high density urban populations and agricultural lands inclose proximity. The provisioning of water is also critical to sustained ecological function,including habitat for endangered species like the southern California steelhead. Given theimportance of water provisioning and other ecosystem services, there is surprisingly little knownregarding their vulnerability to future climates and increasing fire in southern California.This is particularly concerning given the predicted impacts of climate change...
Why Rangelands: The Central Valley of California, the surrounding foothills and the interior Coast Range include over 18 million acres of grassland. Most of this land is privately owned and managed for livestock production. Because grasslands are found in some of California’s fastest-growing counties, they are severely threatened by land conversion and development. In addition climate change stresses grasslands by potentially changing water availability and species distributions.Maintaining a ranching landscape can greatly support biodiversity conservation in the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) region. In addition ranches generate multiple ecosystem services—defined as human benefits provided...
Categories: Data, Project; Tags: 2011, 2012, 2013, Applications and Tools, CA, All tags...


map background search result map search result map Assessing climate change vulnerability and developing a climate change adaptation strategy for Sierra Nevada birds Projected climate change and urbanization impacts on the distribution of Ceanothus verrucosus Assessing the impacts of future climates and fire on hydrologic regimes in the Mediterranean-type ecosystems of southern California Projected climate change and urbanization impacts on the distribution of Ceanothus verrucosus Assessing the impacts of future climates and fire on hydrologic regimes in the Mediterranean-type ecosystems of southern California Assessing climate change vulnerability and developing a climate change adaptation strategy for Sierra Nevada birds