Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: Biodiversity Hotspots (X) > partyWithName: Conservation Biology Institute (X)

2 results (6ms)   

View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
The biodiversity hotspots are regions known to hold especially high numbers of species found nowhere else, yet their remaining habitat combined covers a little more than two percent of Earth's land surface. According to the criteria developed by Myers et al. (2000), a hotspot must meet two thresholds in order to qualify: 1) it must have at least 1500 endemic, native vascular plant species, and 2) it must have already lost at least 70% of its primary, native vegetation.Hotspots analysis is in constant evolution. There are two major ways in which hotspots can change over time. The first is a real effect. Threats and their impacts change, meaning that some places may become more threatened while others may recover....
thumbnail
The biodiversity hotspots are regions known to hold especially high numbers of species found nowhere else, yet their remaining habitat combined covers a little more than two percent of Earth's land surface. According to the criteria developed by Myers et al. (2000), a hotspot must meet two thresholds in order to qualify: 1) it must have at least 1500 endemic, native vascular plant species, and 2) it must have already lost at least 70% of its primary, native vegetation. In the updated analysis, Mittermeier et al. (2004) recognize 34 hotspots which together hold 50% of the world's plant species and 42% of all terrestrial vertebrates as endemics. As evidence of their urgency for global conservation, hotspots also hold...


    map background search result map search result map Biodiversity Hotspots Revisited, Conservation International, 2011 Biodiversity Hotspots Revisited, Conservation International, 2004 Biodiversity Hotspots Revisited, Conservation International, 2011 Biodiversity Hotspots Revisited, Conservation International, 2004