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Introduced (non-native) species that become established may eventually become invasive, so tracking all introduced species provides a baseline for effective modeling of species trends and interactions, geospatially and temporally. The United States Register of Introduced and Invasive Species (US-RIIS) (ver. 2.0, November 2022, https://doi.org/10.5066/P9KFFTOD), as of 2022-10-23, is comprised of three lists, for the localities of Alaska (AK, with 545 records), Hawaii (HI, with 5,628 records), and the conterminous (or lower 48) United States (L48, with 8,527 records). Each includes introduced (non-native), established (reproducing) taxa that: are, or may become, invasive (harmful) in the locality; are not known to...
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Our proposal addresses Funding Category Ill by evaluating natural resource management practices and adaptation opportunities. More specifically, our project addresses Science Need #6 to improve monitoring and inventory of watersheds and ecosystems (including invasive species). Our proposed study will occur within the Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) (upper Virgin River, UT) and the Desert LCC (lower Virgin River, AZ and NVL and therefore will be submitting to both cooperatives. Invasive saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) is the third most abundant tree in Southwestern riparian systems (Friedman et al. 2005). Resource managers must often balance the management goals of protecting wildlife species and...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2012, AZ-01, AZ-02, AZ-03, AZ-04, All tags...
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Introduction: Tamarisk (Tamarix spp., also saltcedar) is a non-native tree introduced to the United States during the 19th century as an ornamental species and solution to erosion in the American West (Robinson 1965). Tamarisk can form dense monotypic stands, which have been linked to a decline in richness and diversity of native plants (Engel-Wilson & Ohmart 1978; Lovich et al. 1994) and wildlife (Anderson et al. 1977; Durst et al. 2008) in riparian areas. As a result, natural resource managers have invested millions of dollars to control tamarisk (Shafroth & Briggs 2008). Few studies have conducted community-level analyses to document the impact of one of these methods, the introduction of a native enemy or predator,...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2012, AZ-01, AZ-02, AZ-03, AZ-04, All tags...
FY2015This project assesses the efficacy of ACK55, a naturally occurring bacterium that decreases invasive annual grasses by up to 70% on test sites. Working with the USDA, USFWS and the Great Basin Institute, researchers plan to treat ten, 1-acre plots on private lands within sage-grouse Biologically Significant Areas to determine the efficacy of ACK55 in warm and dry soils.
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The data release presents observations of riparian vegetation, topography, and ground cover in two river reaches of the Upper Colorado River within a river segment extending 208 river kilometers (rkm), from near the Colorado/Utah border to the confluence of the Green River. Methods included field observations and analysis of the plant community five times over eight years in the fall of 2010, 2012, 2013, 2015 and 2017, encompassing a second cycle of biocontrol-induced dieback of invasive Tamarix spp. shrubs. The data release includes four .csv files related to field observations: UTM coordinates of field transects; vegetation, topography and ground surface information at the pinpoint level and at the transect level;...
Exotic vegetation has become a major habitat component in many ecosystems around the world, sometimes dramatically changing the vegetation community structure and composition. In the southwestern United States, riparian ecosystems are undergoing major changes in part due to the establishment and spread of the exotic Tamarix (saltcedar, tamarisk). There are concerns about the suitability of Tamarix as habitat for birds. Although Tamarix habitats tend to support fewer species and individuals than native habitats, Arizona Breeding Bird Atlas data and Birds of North America accounts show that 49 species use Tamarix as breeding habitat. Importantly, the relative use of Tamarix and its quality as habitat vary substantially...
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FY2015This project assesses the efficacy of ACK55, a naturally occurring bacterium that decreases invasive annual grasses by up to 70% on test sites. Working with the USDA, USFWS and the Great Basin Institute, researchers plan to treat ten, 1-acre plots on private lands within sage-grouse Biologically Significant Areas to determine the efficacy of ACK55 in warm and dry soils.
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Amphibians and reptiles (herpetofauna) have been linked to specific microhabitat characteristics, microclimates, and water resources in riparian forests. Our objective was to relate variation in herpetofauna abundance to changes in habitat caused by a beetle used for Tamarix biocontrol (Diorhabda carinulata; Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and riparian restoration. During 2013 and 2014, we measured vegetation and monitored herpetofauna via trapping and visual encounter surveys (VES) at locations affected by biocontrol along the Virgin River in the Mojave Desert of the southwestern United States. Twenty-one sites were divided into four riparian stand types based on density and percent cover of dominant trees (Tamarix,...
Categories: Data, Publication; Types: Citation, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2012, AZ-01, AZ-02, AZ-03, AZ-04, All tags...
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Polygon geometry for a biological control agent treatment area. An application of a biological control. Biological control is the use of a weed's natural enemies (chiefly insects and pathogens) to reduce its population below a desired level. It can be divided into the following two approaches: inundative and classical. Inundative biological control uses mass application of an organism to attempt to eliminate a weed from an area. Like all such methods, it does not deal with the residual seed bank in the soil or prevent the weed from establishing from another source at a later date. Classical biological control uses the weed's natural enemies to establish a long-term balance between the biological control organism...
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FY2015This project assesses the efficacy of ACK55, a naturally occurring bacterium that decreases invasive annual grasses by up to 70% on test sites. Working with the USDA, USFWS and the Great Basin Institute, researchers plan to treat ten, 1-acre plots on private lands within sage-grouse Biologically Significant Areas to determine the efficacy of ACK55 in warm and dry soils.
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FY2015This project assesses the efficacy of ACK55, a naturally occurring bacterium that decreases invasive annual grasses by up to 70% on test sites. Working with the USDA, USFWS and the Great Basin Institute, researchers plan to treat ten, 1-acre plots on private lands within sage-grouse Biologically Significant Areas to determine the efficacy of ACK55 in warm and dry soils.
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Description: Invasive saltcedar is the third most abundant tree in Southwestern riparian systems. Resource managers must often balance the goals of protecting native wildlife species and habitats with the control of non-native and invasive plants. This project examined the impact of the tamarisk leaf beetle (a biocontrol agent) on amphibian and reptile (herpetofauna) and bird populations and communities along the Virgin River in Utah, Arizona and Nevada.Building on two years of pre-biocontrol monitoring, the researchers tracked changes in herpetofauna communities as the biocontrol entered a system dominated by a non-native plant species. The tamarisk leaf beetle is known to be eaten by several wildlife species....
Categories: Data, Publication; Types: Citation, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2012, AZ-01, AZ-02, AZ-03, AZ-04, All tags...
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Synopsis: Agronomic intensification has transformed many agricultural landscapes into expansive monocultures with little natural habitat. A pervasive concern is that such landscape simplification results in an increase in insect pest pressure, and thus an increased need for insecticides. We tested this hypothesis across a range of cropping systems in the Midwestern United States, using remotely sensed land cover data, data from a national census of farm management practices, and data from a regional crop pest monitoring network. We found that, independent of several other factors, the proportion of harvested cropland treated with insecticides increased with the proportion and patch size of cropland and decreased...
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FY2015This project assesses the efficacy of ACK55, a naturally occurring bacterium that decreases invasive annual grasses by up to 70% on test sites. Working with the USDA, USFWS and the Great Basin Institute, researchers plan to treat ten, 1-acre plots on private lands within sage-grouse Biologically Significant Areas to determine the efficacy of ACK55 in warm and dry soils.
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FY2017The Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy Actionable Science Plan places a high priority on assessing control measures for invasive annual grasses, which provide fuel for rangeland fire and impede restoration of desirable perennials. Weed-suppressive strains of the bacterium Psuedomonas fluoresens (P.f.) are an emerging but yet untested tool for selectively reducing these annual grasses. P.f. may suppress annuals for approximately 2-5 years, bridging the short-term action of herbicides and long-term resistance provided as native bunchgrasses recover. In 2015-2016, the USGS responded to a request from the Idaho sage grouse action group to establish a series of field-based experiments to assess the efficacy...
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The data release includes four .csv files related to field observations: UTM coordinates of field transect and vegetation plot locations; vegetation and topography; species codes; and sediment quality.


    map background search result map search result map Invasive Alien Plant Biological Control Agent Treatment Area Agricultural landscape simplification and insecticide use in the Midwestern United States. Effects of Bio-Control and Restoration on Wildlife in Southwestern Riparian Habitats Assessment of ACK55 as a Biocontrol of Invasive Annual Grasses in Nevada Final Report: Effects of Biocontrol and Restoration on Wildlife in Southwestern Riparian Habitats Publication: The effects of riparian restoration following saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) biocontrol on habitat and herpetofauna along a desert stream Science Brief for Resource Managers: Effects of Biocontrol and Restoration on Wildlife in Southwestern Riparian Habitats Evaluation of Weed-Suppressive Bacteria for Control of Exotic Annual Grasses Assessment of ACK55 as a Biocontrol of Invasive Annual Grasses in Nevada Assessment of ACK55 as a Biocontrol of Invasive Annual Grasses in Nevada Assessment of ACK55 as a Biocontrol of Invasive Annual Grasses in Nevada Assessment of ACK55 as a Biocontrol of Invasive Annual Grasses in Nevada Riparian vegetation, topography, and sediment quality along the Lower Virgin River 2010-2017 Riparian vegetation, topography, and ground cover constituents along the Upper Colorado River near Moab, UT (2010-2017) (ver. 1.1, Jan 2023) Evaluation of Weed-Suppressive Bacteria for Control of Exotic Annual Grasses Assessment of ACK55 as a Biocontrol of Invasive Annual Grasses in Nevada Assessment of ACK55 as a Biocontrol of Invasive Annual Grasses in Nevada Assessment of ACK55 as a Biocontrol of Invasive Annual Grasses in Nevada Assessment of ACK55 as a Biocontrol of Invasive Annual Grasses in Nevada Assessment of ACK55 as a Biocontrol of Invasive Annual Grasses in Nevada Riparian vegetation, topography, and sediment quality along the Lower Virgin River 2010-2017 Riparian vegetation, topography, and ground cover constituents along the Upper Colorado River near Moab, UT (2010-2017) (ver. 1.1, Jan 2023) Effects of Bio-Control and Restoration on Wildlife in Southwestern Riparian Habitats Final Report: Effects of Biocontrol and Restoration on Wildlife in Southwestern Riparian Habitats Publication: The effects of riparian restoration following saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) biocontrol on habitat and herpetofauna along a desert stream Science Brief for Resource Managers: Effects of Biocontrol and Restoration on Wildlife in Southwestern Riparian Habitats Agricultural landscape simplification and insecticide use in the Midwestern United States. Invasive Alien Plant Biological Control Agent Treatment Area