Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: Bees (X)

16 results (164ms)   

View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
Land use was quantified within a 4-km radius around 36 apiaries in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota over two years, 2015-16 and 2016-17. The area (hectares) of Ag (corn, soy, small grains), Grass (pasture, grassland, fallow land, wildflowers, shrub land, and hay land), Wetlands (herbaceous and woody), and Bee crops (alfalfa, canola, sunflower) were quantified around each apiary in each year. Within each apiary, the average change in frames of adult bees among all colonies from June to September was calculated. Additionally, the average September Varroa mite infestation rate, the average adult population size during almond pollination, the count of colonies exhibiting queen events in September, and the count...
thumbnail
Synopsis: Agricultural intensification and expansion are major present and future causes of global ecosystem disruption. Natural and semi-natural reserve areas in agroecosystems are thought to be important for preservation of essential ecosystem services such as pollination, but data about land use patterns and pollinator abundance are lacking. We assessed wild bee populations in canola fields in an agriculturally intense area where virtually all land was either tilled agricultural fields or semi-natural grazed pasturelands, with the expectation that mosaics of land use types may better support ecosystem services than homogenous crop areas. Fields were chosen in two categories, five with little or no pastureland...
thumbnail
Data included in this data set are for blue vane trap captured native bees from Logan County, Colorado starting in 2012 and ending in 2014. Data collected were the number of bees captured per date, per field, and identified to genus. Net level data contains 16,229 records.
thumbnail
A crepuscular or nocturnal lifestyle has evolved in bees several times independently, probably to explore rewarding pollen sources without competition and to minimize predation and nest parasites. Despite these obvious advantages, only few bee species are nocturnal. Here we show that the sensitivity of the bee apposition eye is a major factor limiting the ability to forage in dim light. We present data on eye size, foraging times, and light levels for Megalopta genalis (Augochlorini, Halictidae) in Panama, and Lasioglossum (Sphecodogastra) sp. (Halictini, Halictidae) in Utah, USA. M. genalis females forage exclusively during twilight, but as a result of dim light levels in the rain forest, they are adapted to extremely...
thumbnail
Honey bee colonies located in 2 apiaries in North Dakota were fitted with two types of monitoring device: pollen traps and scales. Data were collected from devices periodically throughout the 2014 season (May-October). Data derived from pollen traps included: the total fresh weight of pollen collected, the percent crude protein content, the percent content of each amino acid, and DNA identification of floral plant sources. Scales collected colony weight through time.
thumbnail
This dataset includes pollen sample weight in grams and percent crude protein collected by honey bees (Apis mellifera) across 38 apiaries in Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota approximately weekly from June through September in 2015 and 2016. Additionally it includes the hectares of different land covers (corn, Zea mays, & soybeans, Glycine max, grasslands, bee forage crops, and wetlands) located within a 4 km radius of each apiary.
Riparian habitats along regulated rivers are important providers of native insects to pollinate nearby irrigated orchards and crop fields. Commercially managed bees are suffering serious declines due to introduced parasites and pathogens (National Academy of Sciences [NAS] 2007), increasing the importance of native pollinators in agricultural production (Winfree et al. 2007). The populations of native pollinators relying on riparian habitats, in turn, are tightly coupled to the status of riparian plants and on the processes that ensure plant population persistence. Both of these factors are strongly linked to river hydrology. We will conduct a literature review, examine the potential consequences of climate-induced...
thumbnail
Here we compare pollen identification results derived from light microscopy and DNA sequencing techniques of a robust number of samples collected from honey bee colonies embedded within intensive agricultural landscapes in the Northern Great Plains. We collected pollen samples from colonies within 6 apiaries in 2010 and 2011. For each pollen sample, we identified pollen grains via light microscopy and provide the number of grain counts-per-million. A separate aliquot of each pollen sample subjected to light microscope identification was also used for DNA sequencing analysis. We provide the plant operational taxonomic unit (OTU) for all base pair reads as the number of reads-per-million.
thumbnail
These data describe land use (summed hectares of agricultural crops: corn, soy, and small grains), individual honey bee nutrition, honey bee colony population size, and proportional honey bee colony survival among 36 apiaries across Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota.


    map background search result map search result map Light intensity limits foraging activity in nocturnal and crepuscular bees Can pastureland increase wild bee abundance in agriculturally intense areas? A comparison of honey bee-collected pollen from working agricultural lands using light microscopy and ITS metabarcoding datasets Using colony monitoring devices to evaluate the impacts of land use and forage quality on honey bee health datasets Spatio-temporally decoupled land use influences honey bee health and pollination service delivery dataset Nutritional physiology of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) workers across an agricultural land-use gradient dataset Native Bee Genera in Colorado Conservation Reserve Program Fields, Collected from 2012-2014 Data release for: ‘Do the quality and quantity of honey bee-collected pollen vary across an agricultural land-use gradient?’ Using colony monitoring devices to evaluate the impacts of land use and forage quality on honey bee health datasets Native Bee Genera in Colorado Conservation Reserve Program Fields, Collected from 2012-2014 Can pastureland increase wild bee abundance in agriculturally intense areas? A comparison of honey bee-collected pollen from working agricultural lands using light microscopy and ITS metabarcoding datasets Spatio-temporally decoupled land use influences honey bee health and pollination service delivery dataset Nutritional physiology of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) workers across an agricultural land-use gradient dataset Light intensity limits foraging activity in nocturnal and crepuscular bees Data release for: ‘Do the quality and quantity of honey bee-collected pollen vary across an agricultural land-use gradient?’