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The northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens) is a formerly abundant frog that has experienced significant declines across its range and is considered endangered in some parts of the range but still abundant in other parts of the range. Various factors have been invoked to explain population declines in the northern leopard frog, including habitat destruction, diseases, chemical contamination, acidification, increased ultraviolet light due to loss of the ozone layer, introduced predators, overcollecting, climatic changes, and general environmental degradation. However, no one cause has emerged as the primary factor behind population declines in any area. Probably, multiple causes contribute to population...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The dwarf shrew (Sorex nanus) is one of the smallest mammals in the world, and inhabits a variety of habitats in western North America. Very little is known about this shrew, and relatively few specimens have been collected. Like most members of Soricidae, the dwarf shrew has a long and pointed nose, small eyes and ears, and a small body. It is difficult to distinguish from other shrews and generally has to be identified by dental characteristics. The dwarf shrew occurs primarily in mountainous areas, apparently preferring rock outcrops and talus slopes in alpine, subalpine, and montane settings. However, it has been occasionally found in lower and more arid environments such as shortgrass prairie, shrub-steppe,...
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Myotis evotis (long-eared myotis), a former Category 2 Candidate, is currently recognized by several federal and state agencies as a sensitive species, in part because very little information exists to provide evaluations on population status and viability locally or rangewide. Primary threats to M. evotis are roost disturbance (especially that leading to loss or destruction of roosting structures), habitat alteration, and toxic chemicals. Roost disturbance (especially of maternity roosts and hibernacula) can take the form of direct human contact or alternation of the roost environment. Habitat alteration refers to modification of any component of the required habitat mosaic, (e.g., presence and quality...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The Brewer’s Sparrow (Spizella breweri) has significantly declined throughout its breeding range in the last 25 years (Ashley and Stoval 2004). Despite being thought of by many as the most common bird in spring and summer in shrubsteppe habitat, the Brewer’s Sparrow has been given special conservation status in several western states, including Wyoming (Knick and Rotenberry 2000). Habitat fragmentation and other processes threaten Brewer’s Sparrow populations in several ways. In this report, shrubsteppe is defined as habitat with a “…codominance of sagebrush [Artemesia spp.] and native bunch grass and moderate shrub cover” (B. Walker, personal communication). This report reviews key published literature,...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis) is the smallest of any North American rabbit species. It was first described as Lepus idahoensis in 1891 by Meriam (Meriam 1891). It is endemic to sagebrush habitats in the Great Basin and adjacent intermountain areas and typically occupies tall and dense sagebrush patches. Pygmy rabbits are dietary specialists on big sagebrush. They are considered a keystone species in big sagebrush communities because they don’t thrive in habitats dominated by other shrub species, they exhibit a unique fossorial behavior, other species of vertebrates and invertebrates use their extensive burrow system, and they provide a reliable food supply for terrestrial and avian predators...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The Mountain Plover (Charadrius montanus) is and endemic shorebird species which breeds in grassland and shrubsteppe habitats of the western Great Plains and Colorado Plateau. Occurrences of this species in Wyoming are constrained to breeding and migration seasons. First described in 1837 by J. K. Townsend, from the tablelands of the Rocky Mountains in the region of the Sweetwater River, Wyoming (AOU 1983), this species is locally common and has been detected in every county of Wyoming. The Mountain Plover was proposed for listing as threatened under the Endangered Species Act by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1999. The proposal for listing was withdrawn in 2003, as perceived threats to the species...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The western subspecies of Corynorhinus, C. townsendii pallescens and C. t. townsendii are not currently federally listed or candidate species throughout their range. Two eastern subspecies, C. townsendii ingens and C. townsendii virginianus, are currently listed as Endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Both Regions 2 and 4 of the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management in Wyoming and Colorado list the full species as sensitive within their jurisdictions. The Bureau of Land Management in South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas apparently does not provide any special protection for the bats. The Wyoming Natural Diversity Database lists it as being of particular conservation concern as indicated...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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Plegadis chihi, the White-faced Ibis, is a member of the Ciconiiformes order. They are large, long-legged birds, and they fly with a strong and steady wingbeat (Trost 1989). They are members of the Threskiornithidae family and as such are wading birds. They are gregarious, heronlike birds with long legs and long specialized bills to facilitate feeding in shallow waters (Field Guide to the Birds of North America 1999). They often fly in flocks of 10-50 birds, either in a “V” formation or in long lines, and their only vocalization is a double grunt that sounds like “greh-greh” (Trost 1989). The White-faced Ibis is an attractive wading bird that is locally common in the western United States, where it...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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Four populations of Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris) are currently recognized, including three disjunct, southern populations and a main population extending from northwest Wyoming through western Canada. The main (or northern) population includes Wyoming. It has no federal status as endangered or threatened and is generally considered to be secure, although some local declines have been documented. Most occupied habitat for the Columbia spotted frog occurs on lands managed by the National Forest Service (Regions 2 and 4) and the National Park Service (Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks ). The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) may have potential habitat in the Green River Basin and higher...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, UCRB, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus) is the largest bird in the sandpiper family (Scolopacidae), and one of only nine species of grassland birds that is considered endemic to the Great Plains (Dugger and Dugger 2002). This curlew species has the southernmost breeding distribution and northernmost wintering distribution of the four curlew species found in North America (Dugger and Dugger 2002). It breeds in the Great Plains, Great Basin, and intermontane valleys of the western U.S. and southwestern Canada (Dugger and Dugger 2002). The Longbilled Curlew is cinnamon-brown above, and buff below, with a very long, strongly downcurved bill (Field Guide to the Birds of North America 1999). Cinnamon-buff wing...
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The Great Basin spadefoot toad (Spea intermontana) is currently recognized by the Canadian government as a threatened species. In addition, some state agencies throughout its range recognize S. intermontana as a sensitive species, often because too little is known about it to provide evaluations on population status and viability throughout its range. In the last couple of decades, amphibians around the world have experienced population decline, range reduction, and even extinction. This observed trend has been attributed to habitat degradation and loss, chemical pollution, acid precipitation, increased ultraviolet radiation, introduced species, and pathogens, which all combine with the natural fluctuation...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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Pocket gophers are small, vole-like members of the family Geomyidae. They inhabit much of the western half of the United States, a large area of southwestern Canada, and much of Mexico (Bailey 1915). They are powerfully built mammals that are strongly adapted to fossorial living, with small ears, small eyes, fur-lined cheek pouches used to carry food, and very strong front limbs with long nails used for digging. There are several species of pocket gophers in Wyoming and the surrounding states. All look very similar, making it difficult to distinguish specimens to species. Reliable identification has to involve chromosomal analysis (i.e., karyotyping to count chromosome number), with supporting information from geographic...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis, Linnaeus 1758) is a diurnal raptor (Family Accipitridae) of temperate forests and woodlands. The genus Accipiter is representative of closely related hawks noted for long tails and relatively broad wings, well suited for pursuit of prey in dense forests. Once commonly known as “bird hawks”, (Craighead and Craighead 1956) the genus is well known for aerial pursuit of avian prey, however, the diet of accipiters is very diverse. Reliant upon explosive acceleration and adept maneuverability, the Northern Goshawk is a predator of birds and small mammals throughout its range. The species has proven to be highly influenced by cyclical abundances of prey species in any...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
Abstract (from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320714002882): With ongoing global change, there is an urgent need to expand existing networks of important conservation areas around the world. In the western United States, vast areas of public land, including those administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), present substantial conservation opportunities. For 11 contiguous western states, we used a novel multiple-criteria analysis to model and map contiguous areas of roadless BLM land that possessed important ecological indicators of high biodiversity, resilience to climate change, and landscape connectivity. Specifically, we leveraged available spatial datasets to implement a systematic...
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Boreal toads (Bufo boreas boreas) were once considered widely distributed and common amphibians in the western United States. The boreal toad shows signs of significant declines in population size and distribution across its range in western North America, and especially in the southern Rocky Mountains (Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico) (Corn et al 1989, Carey 1993, Corn 1994, Keinath and Bennet 2000, BTRT 2001). The Southern Rocky Mountain Population of boreal toads was petitioned for federal listing with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1995 and was classified as warranted but precluded (USDI Fish and Wildlife Service 1995). The boreal toad has been listed as endangered by the state of New Mexico...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) reaches its southern range limit in the mountains of Colorado and southern Wyoming. In the continuous boreal forests of Canada and Alaska lynx populations are widespread and stable (Quinn and Parker 1987). Boreal forests attenuate in the Central and Southern Rocky Mountains, where they occur only on discrete mountain ranges separated by dry shrub- and grass-dominated basins. Populations of boreo-alpine vertebrates like lynx are similarly fragmented in this region (Beauvais 2000). There is concern that populations of lynx in the contiguous United States are vulnerable to habitat limitations and lack of regulatory mechanisms to protect them. Consequently the USDI Fish...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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White tailed prairie dog range presently occurs 4 western states; Wyoming (71%), Colorado (16%), Utah (12%) and Montana (1%). This species is typically found in shrub-steppe and grassland environments in cool intermountain basins. White tails are one of five species of Cynomys, they have many characteristics that make them unique. Historically, white tails have been much maligned by white settlers in the west. Aggressive, government sponsored poisoning campaigns coupled with unregulated shooting and, most recently, the introduction of an exotic disesase (Plague, Yersinia pestis) have worked in unison to reduce population sizes from what they once presumably were. Currently, white-tailed prairie dogs still...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The sage thrasher (Oreoscoptes montanus), a sagebrush-steppe obligate that relies on large expanses of sagebrush-steppe for successful breeding, is recognized by Canada and several U.S. state agencies as a sensitive species that is apparently at risk based on loss or alteration of breeding habitat and decreasing population trends. In this context, habitat alteration refers to modification of any component of the required habitat mosaic, (e.g., presence and quality of tall big sagebrush (Artemesia spp.), adequate cover, and increased vertical and horizontal heterogeneity) that might directly decrease suitability for nesting habitat. Primary threats to O. montanus habitat are agricultural field cultivation,...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The Sage Sparrow (Amphispiza belli) is a common breeding bird in landscapes dominated by big sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) in western North America. The species prefers large, undisturbed tracts of tall and dense sagebrush. Such habitat is declining across large areas, and many sagebrush obligates such as the Sage Sparrow are showing corresponding declines in distribution and abundance. For example, in Washington over half the native shrubsteppe has been converted to agriculture in the last 150 years (Vander Haegen et al. 2000). In this report, shrubsteppe is defined as an environment with a “…co-dominance of sagebrush and native bunch grass and moderate shrub cover” (B. Walker, personal communication)....
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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The loggerhead shrike (Lanius ludovicianus ) is widespread in North America, where it generally occurs in open habitats with abundant insect prey and perches for hunting. Examples of suitable habitat are grasslands, sagebrush, and a variety of shrub-steppe habitats. However, it has demonstrated a substantial contraction in distribution and declines in abundance throughout North America. The reasons for these declines are not fully known, although reduction in quality and quantity of native grassland and shrub-steppe communities is a major contributing factor, particularly on wintering grounds in the southern United States and Mexico. Other threats include livestock grazing (decreased prey availability...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report


map background search result map search result map Species Assessment for Great Basin Spadefoot Toad (Spea Intermontana) in Wyoming Species Assessment for Western Long-Eared Myotis (Myotis Evotis) in Wyoming Species Assessment for White-Faced Ibis (Plegadis Chihi) in Wyoming Species Assessment for Sage Thrasher (Oreoscoptes Montanus) in Wyoming Species Assessment For White-Tailed Prairie Dog (Cynomys Leucurus) In Wyoming Species Assessment For Boreal Toad(Bufo Boreas Boreas) In Wyoming Species Assessment for Wyoming Pocket Gopher (Thomomys Clusius) in Wyoming Species Assessment For The Northern Leopard Frog (Rana Pipiens) In Wyoming Species Assessment for Long-Billed Curlew (Numenius Americanus) in Wyoming Species Assessment for Dwarf Shrew (Sorex Nanus) in Wyoming Species Assessment for Sage Sparrow (Amphispiza Belli) in Wyoming Species Assessment For Townsend’s Big-Eared Bat (Corynorhinus [=Plecotus] Townsendii) In Wyoming Species Assessment for Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella Breweri) in Wyoming Species Assessment For Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius Ludovicianus) In Wyoming Species Assessment For Pygmy Rabbit (Brachylagus Idahoensis) In Wyoming Species Assessment For Canada Lynx (Lynx Canadensis) In Wyoming Species assessment for Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris) in Wyoming Species Assessment For Mountain Plover (Charadrius Montanus) In Wyoming Species Assessment For Northern Goshawk (Accipiter Gentilis) In Wyoming Species Assessment for Great Basin Spadefoot Toad (Spea Intermontana) in Wyoming Species Assessment for Western Long-Eared Myotis (Myotis Evotis) in Wyoming Species Assessment for White-Faced Ibis (Plegadis Chihi) in Wyoming Species Assessment for Sage Thrasher (Oreoscoptes Montanus) in Wyoming Species Assessment For White-Tailed Prairie Dog (Cynomys Leucurus) In Wyoming Species Assessment For Boreal Toad(Bufo Boreas Boreas) In Wyoming Species Assessment for Wyoming Pocket Gopher (Thomomys Clusius) in Wyoming Species Assessment For The Northern Leopard Frog (Rana Pipiens) In Wyoming Species Assessment for Long-Billed Curlew (Numenius Americanus) in Wyoming Species Assessment for Dwarf Shrew (Sorex Nanus) in Wyoming Species Assessment for Sage Sparrow (Amphispiza Belli) in Wyoming Species Assessment For Townsend’s Big-Eared Bat (Corynorhinus [=Plecotus] Townsendii) In Wyoming Species Assessment for Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella Breweri) in Wyoming Species Assessment For Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius Ludovicianus) In Wyoming Species Assessment For Pygmy Rabbit (Brachylagus Idahoensis) In Wyoming Species Assessment For Canada Lynx (Lynx Canadensis) In Wyoming Species assessment for Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris) in Wyoming Species Assessment For Mountain Plover (Charadrius Montanus) In Wyoming Species Assessment For Northern Goshawk (Accipiter Gentilis) In Wyoming