Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: Pacific Northwest (X)

5 results (37ms)   

Filters
Date Range
Extensions
Types
Contacts
Categories
Tag Types
Tag Schemes
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
Wetlands are globally important ecosystems that provide critical services for natural communities and human society, such as water storage and filtration, wildlife habitat, agriculture, recreation, nutrient cycling, and carbon sequestration. They are also considered to be among the most sensitive ecosystems to climate change, which will exacerbate the already threatened nature of wetlands due to changes in land-use. In montane regions, wetlands are expected to be particularly susceptible to climate-induced changes, but tools to assess the impacts of climate change are severely limited relative to other ecosystem types. To address the need for quantitative assessment tools we developed projections of climate-induced...
thumbnail
The forum will have two major goals:. First, to share the successes and learnings of past LCC investments on the subjects of Traditional Ecological Knowledge, subsistence resources, and climate adaptation plans. Second, to identify gaps and future needs as this information becomes useful to inform land and water use planning across the region including the Great Northern LCC and the Great Basin LCC and ATNI.FY2017none
thumbnail
Wetlands in the remote mountains of the western US have undergone two massive ecological “experiments” spanning the 20th century. Beginning in the late 1800s and expanding after World War II, fish and wildlife managers intentionally introduced millions of predatory trout (primarily Oncorhynchus spp) into fishless mountain ponds and lakes across the western states. These new top predators, which now occupy 95% of large mountain lakes, have limited the habitat distributions of native frogs, salamanders, and wetland invertebrates to smaller, more ephemeral ponds where trout do not survive. Now a second “experiment” – anthropogenic climate change – threatens to eliminate many of these ephemeral habitats and shorten...
thumbnail
Wetlands in the remote mountains of the western US have undergone two massive ecological “experiments” spanning the 20th century. Beginning in the late 1800s and expanding after World War II, fish and wildlife managers intentionally introduced millions of predatory trout (primarily Oncorhynchus spp) into fishless mountain ponds and lakes across the western states. These new top predators, which now occupy 95% of large mountain lakes, have limited the habitat distributions of native frogs, salamanders, and wetland invertebrates to smaller, more ephemeral ponds where trout do not survive. Now a second “experiment” – anthropogenic climate change – threatens to eliminate many of these ephemeral habitats and shorten...
thumbnail
Background: Yellow-cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis) is an economically and culturally important tree of the North Pacific coastal rainforest, ranging from northern California through Southeast Alaska. The species has been in decline for many decades, particularly in the northern portion of its range (Southeast Alaska and coastal British Columbia), and is currently under consideration for listing as Threatened or Endangered. Previous work has delineated locations of yellow-cedar stands across the species range, and modeled geophysical features associated with presence of the tree.Purpose: The purpose of this project is to support refinement of a range-wide analysis of bioclimatic factors that support healthy vs....
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: SPECIES MIGRATION, biota, British Columbia, CA-1, CA-2, All tags...


    map background search result map search result map Modeling Climate Impacts on the Hydrology of Pacific Northwest Montane Wetland Ecosystems - Final Report Amphibians in the climate vise: loss and restoration of resilience of montane wetland ecosystems in the western US - Journal Article Northwest Tribal Forum Yellow-cedar decline and recovery:  Climate modeling and data assimilation Climate Change Effects on Pacific Northwest Ecosystems - NPLCC Webinar Northwest Tribal Forum Yellow-cedar decline and recovery:  Climate modeling and data assimilation Modeling Climate Impacts on the Hydrology of Pacific Northwest Montane Wetland Ecosystems - Final Report Amphibians in the climate vise: loss and restoration of resilience of montane wetland ecosystems in the western US - Journal Article Climate Change Effects on Pacific Northwest Ecosystems - NPLCC Webinar