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The midget faded rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis concolor) has long been considered a subspecies of the western rattlesnake (C. viridis). This document will follow this convention, although there is some discussion of taxonomic revision at the species level that would categorize the midget faded rattlesnake as C. oreganos concolor (Crother et al. 2003). Midget faded rattlesnakes are a pale brownish gray, cream, or straw color. Blotches on the body are faded, subrectangular or sub-elliptical. As with most rattlesnakes, the most distinguishing feature is the rattle. Midget faded rattlesnakes are pit vipers, with the typical heat-sensing pits on each side of the head, between the eyes and mouth, used for detecting prey....
The Rawlins Field Office area lies within south-central and southeast Wyoming (Figure 1). The main goals of our analysis of a Reasonable Foreseeable Development scenario were to technically analyze the oil and gas resource occurring within the Field Office area and to project future development potential and activity levels for the period 2001 through 2020. It is a base line scenario and thus it assumes that future activity levels will not be constrained by management-imposed conditions (Rocky Mountain Federal Leadership Forum, 2002). We have recognized current legislatively imposed restrictions that could affect future activity levels and constrained this base line scenario where those types of restrictions have...
Bat conservation is a relatively new phenomenon in Wyoming. Before 1994, bats were not legally protected in the state. In 1994, the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission approved a nongame wildlife regulation protecting several wildlife species, including bats. In 1998, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) joined efforts with other western states to develop the Species Conservation Assessment and Conservation Strategy for the Townsend’s Big-eared Bat (Pierson and others 1999). The resulting document has served as the foundation and the guiding force behind bat conservation efforts in Wyoming. The development of the Western Bat Working Group soon followed this unprecedented proactive conservation initiative....
Colorado is the only state in Region 2 in which significant populations of Abert’s squirrels (Sciurus aberti) exist. Populations of the squirrel have fluctuated widely over the past 100 years, but the species’ viability does not appear to be threatened, nor is the species in danger of extinction at a landscape or forest level anywhere in Colorado. It is normal for the abundance of Abert’s squirrels to vary greatly and frequently due to weather conditions and food supplies. Numbers change over longer periods with forest management practices that alter squirrel habitat condition. Large wildfires have eliminated squirrels and squirrel habitat over vast areas, but such losses do not threaten the species’ viability in...
This Kemmerer planning area Reasonable Foreseeable Development (RFD) Scenario is part of the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Resource Management Plan (RMP) revision process. The purpose of the document is to provide land management planners with estimates of potential oil and gas occurrences and projections of oil and gas exploration and production activity within the planning area for the period 2001 through 2020. The information will be incorporated into the RMP and its associated Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Located in the southwestern corner of Wyoming, the Kemmerer planning area includes most of Uinta and Lincoln counties, the western portion of Sweetwater County, and a small area of Sublette County....
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This assessment was conducted to fulfill the requirements of section 712 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 and to contribute to knowledge of the storage, fluxes, and balance of carbon and methane gas in ecosystems of Alaska. The carbon and methane variables were examined for major terrestrial ecosystems (uplands and wetlands) and inland aquatic ecosystems in Alaska in two time periods: baseline (from 1950 through 2009) and future (projections from 2010 through 2099). The assessment used measured and observed data and remote sensing, statistical methods, and simulation models. The national assessment, conducted using the methodology described in SIR 2010-5233, has been completed for the conterminous...
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The purpose of this report is to explore current oil and gas energy development in the area encompassing the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative. The Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative is a long-term science-based effort to ensure southwestern Wyoming’s wildlife and habitat remain viable in areas facing development pressure. Wyoming encompasses some of the highest quality wildlife habitats in the Intermountain West. At the same time, this region is an important source of natural gas. Using Geographic Information System technology, energy data pertinent to the conservation decision-making process have been assembled to show historical oil and gas exploration and production in southwestern Wyoming....
The Nongame Program of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (Department) was initiated in July 1977. This report summarizes data collected from 15 April 2002 to 14 April 2003 on various nongame bird and mammal surveys and projects conducted by Department personnel, other government agencies, and individuals in cooperation with the Department. Cooperating agencies and individuals are listed in Appendix I or in the individual completion reports, but we recognize that the listing does not completely credit the valuable contributions of the many cooperators, including Wyoming Game and Fish Department Regional Biologists and members of the public. In October of 1987, a Nongame Strategic Plan was distributed; this Plan...
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This assessment was conducted to fulfill the requirements of section 712 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 and to improve understanding of carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes in the Great Plains region in the central part of the United States. The assessment examined carbon storage, carbon fluxes, and other GHG fluxes (methane and nitrous oxide) in all major terrestrial ecosystems (forests, grasslands/shrublands, agricultural lands, and wetlands) and freshwater aquatic systems (rivers, streams, lakes, and impoundments) in two time periods: baseline (generally in the first half of the 2010s) and future (projections from baseline to 2050). The assessment was based on measured and observed...
This cooperative effort by USDA Forest Service Research and the National Forest System assesses the state of knowledge related to the conservation status of four forest carnivores in the western United States: American marten, fisher, lynx, and wolverine. The conservation assessment reviews the biology and ecology of these species. It also discusses management considerations stemming from what is known and identifies information needed. Overall, we found huge knowledge gaps that make it difficult to evaluate the species' conservation status. In the western United States, the forest carnivores in this assessment are limited to boreal forest ecosystems. These forests are characterized by extensive landscapes with...
The Nongame Program of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (Department) was initiated in July 1977. This report summarizes data collected from 15 April 2004 to 14 April 2005 on various nongame bird and mammal surveys and projects conducted by Department personnel, other government agencies, and individuals in cooperation with the Department. Cooperating agencies and individuals are listed in the individual completion reports, but we recognize that the listing does not completely credit the valuable contributions of the many cooperators, including Wyoming Game and Fish Department District Wildlife Biologists and members of the public. In October of 1987, a Nongame Strategic Plan was distributed; this Plan was updated...
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One of the greatest challenges facing the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) in the 21st century will be our ability to maintain sustainable fish and wildlife populations and meet the expectations and desire of our citizens. This challenge can be met by addressing habitat needs and issues that seek to maintain open spaces, non-fragmented quality habitats and the ability of fish and wildlife to utilize these areas. Many areas of the state are imperiled or at-risk. Potential impacts to fish and wildlife are expanding, with some of the most noticeable being energy development, increasing demands for water, other land uses, and urban sprawl. The long-term drought, fire suppression and conflicts in public expectations...
The Nongame Program of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (Department) was initiated in July 1977. This report summarizes data collected from 15 April 2006 to 14 April 2007 on various nongame bird and mammal surveys and projects conducted by Department personnel, other government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in cooperation with the Department. Cooperating agencies and individuals are listed in the individual completion reports, but we recognize that the listing does not completely credit the valuable contributions of the many cooperators, including Wyoming Game and Fish Department District Wildlife Biologists and members of the public. In October of 1987, a Nongame Strategic Plan was...
Fragmentation of habitat is widely acknowledged as detrimental to wildlife and plant species. Landscape analysis is a proven method to identify fragmentation and other agents of change in a given area. Yet landscape analysis is seldom completed prior to initiation of oil and gas projects, despite considerable evidence that oil and gas extraction and transmittal are likely to cause wide-ranging disturbances in the landscape. We conducted a pilot analysis of the landscape of the existing Big Piney-LaBarge oil and gas field in the Upper Green River Basin of Wyoming, a region where more than 3,000 oil and gas wells have been drilled. We measured the degree of habitat fragmentation of the field using three metrics: linear...
The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is the second largest North American bird of prey, with an average wingspan of 7 feet. On 20 June 1782 it was chosen as the emblem of the United States of America because of its long life, great strength, and majestic appearance. This selection had its detractors, most notably Benjamin Franklin who expounded on the bald eagle’s “bad moral character.” The bald eagle's scientific name signifies a sea (halo) eagle (aeetos) with a white (leukos) head (cephalus). In adult birds, the distinctive white head and white tail contrast starkly with the dark brown body and wings. When Europeans first arrived on the North American continent there were an estimated one- quarter to one-half...
The Wyoming State Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy (CWCS) was produced to provide a long-range conservation plan to conserve Wyoming’s Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) and meet the requirements of the Congressionally-authorized State Wildlife Grants (SWG) Program. The Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) served as the lead agency in the development of this strategy, but many other partners and major stakeholders were invited to participate. The CWCS identifies 279 SGCN in Wyoming, along with key habitats for these species. Of these species, 44 have been included because of specific known conservation needs. The remaining 235 have been included primarily due to a lack of key data necessary...
One of the single greatest challenges facing the Wyoming Game and Fish Department in the 21st century will be our ability to maintain sustainable fish and wildlife populations. This challenge can be met by addressing habitat needs and issues that seek to maintain open spaces, quality habitats and the ability of fish and wildlife to utilize these areas. Many habitat types are imperiled or at-risk. Potential impacts to fish and wildlife habitats are expanding, with some of the most noticeable being energy development, other land uses, and urban sprawl. The long-term drought has caused impacts as well. At the same time, we are being asked to take a far more active role in the conservation of all wildlife species, including...
Habitat issues may be the single greatest challenge facing the Wyoming Game and Fish Department in the 21st century. Many habitat types are imperiled or at-risk. Potential impacts to fish and wildlife habitats are expanding, with the two most noticeable being energy development and urban sprawl. The current drought has caused short-term impacts as well. At the same time, we are being asked to take a far more active role in the conservation of wildlife species, including many of which are considered to be at-risk. Conserving these species one species at a time is impractical. To effectively answer this challenge, there is a great need for the Department to be collaboratively involved in habitat-related decisions...


map background search result map search result map Strategic Habitat Plan Annual Report - 2006 Video: Exploration and Production Through Time, produced for report: Oil and Gas Development in Southwestern Wyoming—Energy Data and Services for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), Baseline and projected future carbon storage and greenhouse-gas fluxes in ecosystems of Alaska Video: Exploration and Production Through Time, produced for report: Oil and Gas Development in Southwestern Wyoming—Energy Data and Services for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), Strategic Habitat Plan Annual Report - 2006 Baseline and projected future carbon storage and greenhouse-gas fluxes in ecosystems of Alaska