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SLAMM Modeling of Yaquina Estuary, Central Oregon Coast, credited to Loiselle, R., published in 2010. Published in Oregon Climate Change Research Institute’s (OCCRI) PNW Climate Science Conference, June 15-16, in 2010.
Macroscale hydrologic modeling of ecologically relevant flow metrics in small streams, credited to Hamlet, A F, published in 2010. Published in USFS Region 6 annual meeting, Vancouver, WA., in 2010.
Using biogeographic distributions and natural history to predict marine/estuarine species at risk to climate change, credited to Reusser, D.A., published in 2010. Published in American Physiological Society Intersociety Meeting: Global Change and Global Science: Comparative Physiology in a Changing World. August 4-7, in 2010.
The Canyonlands grabens in southeast Utah form an active extensional fault array covering 200 km2 southeast of the Colorado River. The fault array formed as a result of gravity gliding above a thick layer of salt. Growth of this fault array within the last 0.5 m.y. (possibly last 0.1 m.y.) has resulted in major changes in the stream drainages across the area through processes of stream capture and diversion. During growth of the fault array, relay ramps between overlapping fault segments form topographic lows along the graben margins. These commonly act as access points for captured streams to enter a graben system. As fault segments continue to propagate laterally, linkage leads to breaching of the relay ramp structures....
The potential influence of changing climate on the persistence of native salmonids “at risk�: Linking fine scale analysis to decision support, credited to Muhlfeld, C., published in 2010. Published in USFS Region 1 Annual Water Resources Meeting, Missoula, Montana, 3 March 2010, in 2010.
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Natural gas accumulations with high CO2 concentrations may be useful natural analogs for the study of long-term CO2 storage in geologic strata if viewed in the context of ?CO2 systems?. Comprehensive evaluation of a CO2 system involves the identification of the following parameters: (1) the source and timing of CO2 generation, (2) the CO2 migration pathways, (3) the timing of CO2 migration, and (4) the locations and nature of CO2 traps and seals. The following three examples are described in terms of CO2 systems: (1) the Ellenburger Fields of West Texas, (2) the Leadville Fields of the Paradox Basin, and (3) the Big Escambia Creek and Flomaton Fields of Mississippi. The USGS is applying this concept to the Indian...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation, Conference Citation; Tags: Elsevier
Developmentof water resources in the Colorado River Basin is complicatedby, among other things, the fact that the river containsfour native fish species listed as endangered under the EndangeredSpecies Act (ESA). To address the issues related to resourcedevelopment and compliance with the ESA, the states of Colorado,Utah and Wyoming have joined with the U.S. Department ofInterior, Western Area Power Administration, and representatives of the environmentaland water development communities, to form the Recovery Implementation Programfor Endangered Fishes of the Upper Colorado River Basin (RecoveryProgram). The purpose of the Recovery Program is to facilitaterecovery of the listed fishes, a goal greater than theavoidance...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation, Conference Citation; Tags: ASCE
Astudy of the influences of Paleo Pacific Ocean Sea SurfaceTemperature (SST) variability and water-year Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB)reconstructed streamflow is presented. Reconstructed streamflow data is available fromseveral sources in the UCRB. The proxy records (streamflow) arederived from tree ring chronologies and these streamflow reconstructions providean effective way to analyze patterns of variability (including drought)over a period of time extending beyond any instrumental recordin UCRB. Yearly proxy and coral based Pacific Ocean SSTreconstructions, consisting of five by five degree cells, are availablefrom 1590 to 1990. The range selected for the studyis from Latitude 20� South to 60� North and 120�East...
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Invasions of the annual species cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) in North American ecosystems present a threat to the population viability of native plant and animal species. In the interest of curtailing B. tectorum success, we manipulated the biogeochemistry of Canyonlands National Park soils in greenhouse and germination experiments. We compared growth parameters of B. tectorum and a native perennial, Hilaria jamesii, in greenhouse experiments utilizing 10 soil additives. Biomass of B. tectorum growing in conjuction with H. jamesii was greater than that growing in monocultures, suggesting facilitation of Bromus growth by H. jamesii. The opposite trend was true for H. jamesii, indicating that Bromus inhibits H. jamesii...
Thequality of historical fluvial-sediment data cannot be taken for granted,based on a review of upper Colorado River basin suspended-sedimentdischarges, and on an evaluation of the reliability of TotalSuspended Solids (TSS) data. Additionally, the quality of future fluvial-sedimentdata are not assured. Sediment-surrogate technologies, including those that operateon acoustic, laser, bulk optic, digital optic, or pressure differentialprinciples, are being used with increasing frequency to measure in-streamand (or) laboratory fluvial-sediment characteristics. Data from sediment-surrogate technologies mayyield results that differ significantly from those obtained by traditionalmethods for the same sedimentary conditions....
One of the greatest uncertainties in global environmental change is predicting changes in feedbacks between the biosphere and atmosphere that could present hazards to current earth system function. Terrestrial ecosystems, and in particular forests, exert strong controls on the global carbon cycle and influence regional hydrology and climatology directly through water and surface energy budgets. Widespread, rapid, drought- and infestation-triggered tree mortality is now emerging as a phenomenon affecting forests globally and may be linked to increasing temperatures and drought frequency and severity. We demonstrate the link between climate-sensitive tree mortality and risks of altered earth system function though...
Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) has been an invasive species in the Intermountain West of the United States for approximately 100 years. The species is extremely adaptive to fire disturbed environments in the western US and out-competes many native species once it establishes at a site. While it provides a forage for grazing animals the quality of the forage is considered lower than natives in the area. We investigated changes in physical and chemical properties in two surface soils, over two decades, following cheatgrass establishment by wildland fire (Artemisia tridentata [Big Basin sagebrush] was the predominate vegetation prior to fire). Two soils (US soil taxonomy natriargids and haplodurids) representing a majority...
The Rio Puerco basin (16,100 km2) (fig. 1) is the largest tributary to the Rio Grande in New Mexico, draining more than 20% of its area at San Marcial (fig. 1). The Rio Puerco contributes only 4% of the Rio Grande?s average annual runoff at San Marcial, from a combination of spring snow-melt and monsoonal storms, but contributes over 70% of the Rio Grande?s average annual suspended-sediment load. Data compiled for world rivers by Milliman and Meade (1983) and Zhao and others (1992) show that the Rio Puerco has the fourth highest average annual suspended-sediment concentration (fig. 2). Three major channels have cut and filled the Rio Puerco valley in the past 3,000 years (Love and Young, 1983; Love, 1986). An interesting...
Saltcedars (Tamarix spp., Tamaricaceae) (SC), are exotic, invasive shrubs to medium trees native to the Old World. In riparian ecosystems of the western United States, SC replaces native plant communities, degrades wildlife habitat, reduces biodiversity, alters stream channel morphology, uses large quantities of groundwater, increases wildfire frequency, reduces recreational and agricultural usage, and probably has contributed to the decline of many wildlife and fish species. In recent years, the southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax trailii extimus) (sw WIFL) has begun nesting extensively in SC in some of its major breeding areas in Arizona, but not in other areas, since SC has replaced its native willow nest...
Used first paragraph of introduction as abstract: The Colorado River Basin includes 632 000 km2 in the Western United States and northern Mexico (figure 1). Although average unregulated discharge is only 500 to 600 m3/s [1], the river is an important source of water for more than 12 million people and approximately 1 million ha of irrigated agriculture [2]. Headwaters of the Colorado and its major tributaries, the Green and San Juan Rivers, lie in the high peaks of the Rocky Mountains, where precipitation averages 100 to 150 cm/a. Most of its course, however, crosses the semiarid Colorado Plateau and the Sonoran Desert, where average annual precipitation may be as low as 6 cm [1]. Many of the geologic formations...
Remotely-Sensed Nearshore SSTs of the Northeast Pacific, credited to Reusser, D.A., published in 2010. Published in ClimECO2: Oceans, Marine Ecosystems, and Society facing Climate Change - A multidisciplinary approach - An international Summer School co-organized by IUEM, IMBER and Europôle Mer, August 23-27, in 2010.
TheState of Colorado's Stream Simulation Model (StateMod) is an integralcomponent of the Colorado Decision Support Systems effort. The StateModmodel is a generic water resource model capable of simulatingstream diversions, instream flow demands, well pumping, reservoir operations andriver flows on a monthly or daily basis for anystream system. Fully developed and calibrated StateMod models represent alldirect flow and storage water rights and reservoir operations inthe following river basins: Upper Colorado River and Gunnison Riverbasins, White River and Yampa River basins, San Juan Riverand Dolores River basins, and Rio Grande basin in Coloradoand the Bear River basin in Wyoming. This paper willprovide engineers,...
Exposure of cold-desert cyanobacteral-lichen crusts on three different substrates (sandstone, limestone and gypsum) to different pollution sources showed that while urban pollutants in the Los Angeles basin, especially particulates, significantly degraded chlorophyll on all three substrates, simulated acid rain (pH 3.5, 4.5, 5.5 and 6.5; 1:1 sulfuric and nitric acid) had an opposite, fertilizing effect on sandstone and limestone crusts. Studies around a coal-fired power plant, comparing sites 9 and 12 k, away from the plant with a control site 42 km away, showed the same fertilizing effect on surrounding sandstone crusts. However, less pH-buffered rock lichens had significantly increased electrolyte leakage and...
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The Little Colorado River begins in the White Mountains of Arizona on the slopes of Mount Baldy and flows northwest where it meets the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. The watershed is comprised of approximately 26,964 square miles in northeast Arizona and northwest New Mexico (Arizona Department of Water Resources 1989). Over 69% of the watershed is managed by the Federal government while 21% of the watershed is privately owned. The Navajo Nation occupies the greatest portion of the public lands. The waters of the Little Colorado River and its watershed have many values; these include endangered fish, recreation, industry, irrigation, and sites sacred to Native-Americans. Published in Riparian Management:...
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Experiments conducted over two years have indicated that managed burning and spraying to control saltcedar is only effective in July. Burning in late July prevented 64 percent of the plants from resprouting the year following the treatment, whereas spraying the resprouts with herbicide 1 month after prevented 99 percent or better, of the plants from resprouting. Published in Proceedings of the Western Society of Weed Science, on pages 65 - 72, in 1983.


map background search result map search result map Biogeochemical control of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) germination, emergence, and growth The use of herbicides and/or fire to control saltcedar (Tamarix) Natural gas reservoirs with high CO2 concentrations as natural analogs for CO2 storage The Little Colorado River The use of herbicides and/or fire to control saltcedar (Tamarix) Biogeochemical control of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) germination, emergence, and growth Natural gas reservoirs with high CO2 concentrations as natural analogs for CO2 storage The Little Colorado River