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Since the mid 1970s, Interior Alaska white spruce trees experienced markedly lower growth than during the 19th and early 20th centuries. This observation raises the question of forest persistence on certain sites of lowland central and eastern Alaska. We analyzed white spruce growth across a 36-site network (540 trees) on three major river floodplains in boreal Alaska along a longitudinal gradient from eastern Interior to the southwest tree limit to test for the presence of tree growth patterns and climate sensitivities. Chronologies are compared for temperature sensitivity at both stand and individual tree levels, using data from Bethel, McGrath, and Fairbanks NWS stations during the common period of 1952–2001....
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Global vegetation models predict that boreal forests are particularly sensitive to a biome shift during the 21st century. This shift would manifest itself first at the biome?s margins, with evergreen forest expanding into current tundra while being replaced by grasslands or temperate forest at the biome?s southern edge. We evaluated changes in forest productivity since 1982 across boreal Alaska by linking satellite estimates of primary productivity and a large tree-ring data set. Trends in both records show consistent growth increases at the boreal?tundra ecotones that contrast with drought-induced productivity declines throughout interior Alaska. These patterns support the hypothesized effects of an initiating...
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Since the mid 1970s, Interior Alaska white spruce trees experienced markedly lower growth than during the 19th and early 20th centuries. This observation raises the question of forest persistence on certain sites of lowland central and eastern Alaska. We analyzed white spruce growth across a 36-site network (540 trees) on three major river floodplains in boreal Alaska along a longitudinal gradient from eastern Interior to the southwest tree limit to test for the presence of tree growth patterns and climate sensitivities. Chronologies are compared for temperature sensitivity at both stand and individual tree levels, using data from Bethel, McGrath, and Fairbanks NWS stations during the common period of 1952–2001....
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Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) offers many advantages for assessing archaeological potential in frozen and partially frozen contexts in high latitude and alpine regions. These settings pose several challenges for GPR, including extreme velocity changes at the interface of frozen and active layers, cryogenic patterns resulting in anomalies that can easily be mistaken for cultural features, and the difficulty in accessing sites and deploying equipment in remote settings. In this study we discuss some of these challenges while highlighting the potential for this method by describing recent successful investigations with GPR in the region. We draw on cases from Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Cape Krusenstern...
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This paper calibrates climate controls over radial growth of floodplain white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) and examines whether growth in these populations responds similarly to climate as upland trees in Interior Alaska. Floodplain white spruce trees hold previously unrecognized potential for long-term climate reconstruction because they are the source of driftwood that becomes frozen in coastal deposits, where archeological timbers and beach logs represent well-preserved datable material. We compared ring width chronologies for 135 trees in six stands on the Yukon Flats and Tanana River with temperature and precipitation at Fairbanks from 1912–2001. Our sample contains a stable common signal representing...


    map background search result map search result map Spatial coherence and change of opposite white spruce temperature sensitivities on floodplains in Alaska confirms early-stage boreal biome shift Alpine Ice Patches and Shúhtagot'ine Land Use in the Mackenzie and Selwyn Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada A Thousand Years of Lost Hunting Arrows: Wood Analysis of Ice Patch Remains in Northwestern Canada Consistent negative temperature sensitivity and positive influence of precipitation on growth of floodplain Picea glauca in Interior Alaska Spatial coherence and change of opposite white spruce temperature sensitivities on floodplains in Alaska confirms early-stage boreal biome shift Frozen: The Potential and Pitfalls of Ground-Penetrating Radar for Archaeology in the Alaskan Arctic Frozen: The Potential and Pitfalls of Ground-Penetrating Radar for Archaeology in the Alaskan Arctic Consistent negative temperature sensitivity and positive influence of precipitation on growth of floodplain Picea glauca in Interior Alaska Alpine Ice Patches and Shúhtagot'ine Land Use in the Mackenzie and Selwyn Mountains, Northwest Territories, Canada A Thousand Years of Lost Hunting Arrows: Wood Analysis of Ice Patch Remains in Northwestern Canada Spatial coherence and change of opposite white spruce temperature sensitivities on floodplains in Alaska confirms early-stage boreal biome shift Spatial coherence and change of opposite white spruce temperature sensitivities on floodplains in Alaska confirms early-stage boreal biome shift