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The Climate Commons is the California LCC’s starting point for discovery of climate change data and related resources, information about the science that produced it, and guidance for applying climate change science to conservation in California. One of the services the Commons offers is a collection of articles introducing and explaining key concepts relating to climate change and conservation in California, helping resource managers get up to speed with this science and find important resources that they need to incorporate climate science into their conservation planning. Topics included: Scenario planning, climate-smart conservation, vulnerability assessment, sea-level rise, a summary of the most current climate...
BayGEO Journal Article by Alicia Torregrosa explaining the challenges of mapping fog and the techniques used to create the Fog and Low Cloud Cover map generated from GOES imagery. Karl the Fog is a twitter handle @KarlTheFog for fog watchers.Intro:Within the world of mapping, clouds are a pesky interference to be removed from satellite remote sensed imagery. However, to many of us, that is a waste of pixels. Cloud maps are becoming increasingly valuable in the quest to understand land cover change and surface processes. In coastal California, the dynamic summertime interactions between air masses, the ocean, and topography result in blankets of fog and low clouds flowing into low lying areas of the San Francisco...
List of coastal wetland archetypes with additional information on hydrology and related functions and other issues that may affect management decisions Audience: WRP Partner Agencies and stakeholders, and other resource managers throughout Southern California.
CalWeedMapper is an online tool that provides maps of 210 invasive plants from the California Invasive Plant Inventory, as well as maps of suitable range in 2010 and 2050 climate for 79 species. CalWeedMapper also provides users the ability to generate reports of recommended eradication, surveillance, and containment targets based on the user’s selected area.
The main goal of this project is to ensure that the 2011-13 climate change update to the Baylands Ecosystem Habitat Goals Report (Baylands Goals) and other key, ongoing conservation activities in the San Francisco Bay region use the latest information about the current and future status of San Francisco Bay tidal marsh ecosystems, particularly in the context of sea-level rise. The main product of the project is the improved Sea Level Rise (SLR) Tool, specifically upgraded to inform the Baylands Goals Report update. The tool will continue to be available online at www.prbo.org/sfbayslr. All data layers going into the tool are and will continue to be downloadable from the site.
Data layers of current and projected suitable habitat for five species: big-eared woodrat (Neotoma macrotis), California gnatcatcher, Ceanothus greggii, Ceanothus verrucosus, and Tecate cypress in the South Coast Ecoregion in California, USA. Data set includes scenarios with and without projected urban growth over a 50 year period, and with and without projected climate change over a 50 year period. The potential distribution of Tecate cypress was modeled using a MaxEnt species distribution model using recent and future climate data with presence records from the San Diego Natural History Museum. Species distributions were modeled only for the South Coast Ecoregion in California, USA as this is where management...
The large uncertainty surrounding the future effects of sea-level rise and other aspects of climate change on tidal marsh ecosystems exacerbates the difficulty in planning effective conservation and restoration actions. We addressed these difficulties in the context of large-scale wetland restoration activities underway in the San Francisco Estuary (Suisun, San Pablo and San Francisco Bays). We used a boosted regression tree approach to project the future distribution and abundance of five marsh bird species (through 2110) in response to changes in habitat availability and suitability as a result of projected sea-level rise, salinity, and sediment availability in the Estuary. To bracket the uncertainty, we considered...
A survey of natural resource specialists and land managers was conducted at the beginning of the Pacific Coastal Fog Project. Survey results showed that the most urgently needed dataset was a fog frequency map to help make better natural resource decisions for ecosystem restoration, conservation, and preparing for future climate conditions. Fog maps like these could show which areas receive more or less (or no) fog. This data would help land managers understand the influence of fog on patterns of vegetation distribution, wildfire severity, and stream temperature.The U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) has used satellite camera imagery feeds since 1960 to improve real-time weather forecasting. Originally the images...
The raster grids in this dataset show the relative amount of summertime fog and low cloud cover (FLCC) over a decade for North and Central Coastal California on either a monthly or annual basis. Summertime FLCC is calculated as the average FLCC hours per day from an archive of hourly, day and night, June, July, August, and September, 1999 - 2009, GOES (geostationary operational environmental satellite) images collected and processed into ~26, 000 cloud maps by the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA). These decadal average FLCC rasters do not include years 2001 and 2006 due to missing or incomplete data for June 2001 and August 2006.Layers included:Files, Description1 Decadal Summer (average...
Sites were chosen from Yosemite National Park maps. Larger meadows were prioritized and although most the meadows were within a day’s hike from a trailhead, several were tens of kilometers from the nearest road. Previous research (Morelli et al 2012 Proceedings of the Royal Society B) showed that detectability was very high (>95% with only one visit) so most sites were visited only one or two times although always with two experienced observers. Sites were surveyed on foot for at least 30 minutes during morning or evening hours. A site would be considered occupied if only one Belding’s ground squirrel was detected but in reality numerous individuals were detected at all occupied sites.
To climate scientists, marine fog’s physical opacity symbolizes how much remains to be discovered about the atmospheric phenomenon. This article outlines what is known and unknown about fog and its relationship with climate change.
Raster datasets developed in the project Climate Change/Land Use Change Scenarios for Habitat Threat Assessments on California Rangelands.This data collection is the product of the CA LCC-funded project “Climate Change/Land Use Change Scenarios for Habitat Threat Assessments on California Rangelands”.The project aids conservation of California rangelands by identifying future integrated threats of climate change and land use change, and quantifying two main co-benefits of rangeland conservation – water supply and carbon sequestration. Through a multi-stakeholder partnership, the project proponents developed integrated climate change/land use change scenarios for the Central Valley and Chaparral and Oak Woodland...
Conservation priority maps based on combined bird species current and projected abundance and distribution, updated with new model with improved inputs.Point Blue Conservation Science is currently assessing the effects of sea-level rise (SLR) and salinity changes on San Francisco Bay tidal marsh ecosystems. Tidal marshes are naturally resilient to SLR, in that they can build up elevation through the capture of suspended sediment and deposition of organic material (vegetation). Thus, a “bathtub” model approach is not appropriate for assessing impacts to this dynamic habitat. Rather, dynamic accretion potential can be modeled annually based on tidal inundation, sediment availability, and the rate of organic accumulation...
Percent change in grassland soil carbon sequestration potential. These maps display the percent change in the potential for grassland soil carbon sequestration for each watershed under three IPCC-SRES scenarios – A1B, A2 and B1. Watershed boundaries are from the 8-digit Watershed Boundary Dataset (http://water.usgs.gov/GIS/huc.html). Here soil carbon represents soil organic carbon (up to 20 cm in depth). Future change in soil carbon was modeled by the U.S. Geological Survey’s General Ensemble Biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS) (http://www.usgs.gov/climate_landuse/land_carbon/BGM.asp). Carbon model outputs were produced through the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) national carbon sequestration assessment of ecosystem...
These interactive maps display results from a scenario analysis on the integrated effects of future land use and climate change on rangeland ecosystem services within the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition focus area (the California Central Valley and surrounding foothills). A three-map viewer allows users to view and compare results at the watershed scale across three scenarios simultaneously. Maps are available for the following metrics: 1) Change in the percentage of watershed area with critical habitat, 2) Percent change in grassland soil carbon sequestration potential, 3) Percent change in climatic water deficit relative to the 1981-2010 climate period, 4) Ratio of recharge to runoff for three 30-year...
Standards for project metadata and support documentation for the 22 LCCs to create the metadata were developed by the CA LCC Data Managers under contract by the LCC National Office as part of the effort to create the Simple National Project Catalog database. The resulting database provided a single national source for information to date on all projects funded by the 22 individual LCCs and the national office, and a tool for reviewing these projects, for purposes of national-level management and presenting summaries of this information to Congress. Project descriptions were collected in standardized metadata records using controlled vocabularies, and presented in an online database with searching capabilities. The...
Webinars for regional stakeholders to present findings of the Vulnerability Analysis and Adaptation Planning and encourage participation in subsequent workshops.
We propose a statistically robust, logistically feasible, long-term monitoring program for wintering shorebirds in coastal California and northern Baja to track spatial and temporal population trends resulting from changing climate and habitat conditions. Specifically, we recommend a sampling design and survey protocol for wintering shorebirds in coastal wetland habitat and provide the data storage and analytical framework for population and trend estimates to be made annually as new data come in through the online data portal in the California Avian Data Center. We also recommend a series of needed pilot studies, including evaluating methods for estimating error rates in shorebird counts, determining the appropriate...
Speaker: Matt Reiter, Avian Wetland Quantitative Ecologist, Point Blue Conservation ScienceHow do changes in habitat management and climate effect shorebird populations at local, regional and hemispheric scales? The Pacific Flyway Shorebird Survey project, let by Matt Reiter of Point Blue Conservation Science, seeks to answer this question.This broad-scale, multi-species research and monitoring program will form the foundation to assess shorebird population response to future land use and climate change both within the California LCC and across the Pacific Coast of the Americas. By improving our understanding of which factors most strongly influence shorebird populations and the availability of their habitat through...
In a rapidly changing climate, effective bird conservation requires not only reliable information about the current vulnerability of species of conservation concern, but also credible projections of their future vulnerability. Such projections may enable managers to preempt or reduce emerging climate-related threats through appropriate habitat management. We used NatureServe’s Climate Change Vulnerability Index (CCVI) to predict vulnerability to climate change of 168 bird species that breed in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, USA. The CCVI assesses species-specific exposure and sensitivity to climate change within a defined geographic area, through the integration of (a) species’ range maps, (b) information...